Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 4

A Bloody Day on the Rez; A Columbine Copycat Shatters the Calm in Minnesota
Byline: Dirk Johnson (With Chris Julin and Shawna Widdel in Red Lake) Jeff Weise's school notebook was covered with swastikas and a picture of Adolf Hitler. He scrawled images of bloodied bodies and guns and showed them to classmates. He had threatened...
A Piggy Bank for Social Security; A Trust Fund Invested Only in Treasuries Is of No Real Use. under the Sloan Plan, We'd Invest the Surplus in Mortgages and Corporate Bonds
Byline: Allan Sloan (Sloan is NEWSWEEK's Wall Street editor. His e-mail is sloan@panix.com.) Yes, it must be spring. Lawns are turning green, baseball season is almost here--and Social Security's trustees have just issued their annual report about...
A Very Dangerous Supremes Rerun
Byline: Steven Levy According to Cary Sherman and Dan Glickman, the last thing that the record labels (for whom Sherman lobbies) and movie studios (for whom Glickman lobbies) want is to stifle the development of awesome new gadgets that make life...
Chicago: Home to One Killer Poet
Byline: Dirk Johnson In Chicago poetry circles, J. J. Jameson, 65, was known for his flamboyant ties and hats, and his vivid writing. He was a regular in the city's Poetry Slam competition at the old Green Mill tavern, where his edgy verse drew...
Family Reunion; Three Years after It Was Canceled, a Cartoon Sitcom Returns to Prime Time. the People Have Spoken. They Could've Asked for World Peace. They Wanted More 'Family Guy.'
Byline: Devin Gordon On the night that Fox's animated sitcom "Family Guy" premiered in 1999, its creator, Seth MacFarlane, was one of the network's guests of honor at the Super Bowl. MacFarlane's show had been given the most coveted launch position...
Follow the Money; Watchdogs Are Warning That Corruption in Iraq Is out of Control. but Will the United States Join Efforts to Clamp Down on It?
Byline: Michael Hirsh (With Babak Dehghanpisheh) By many accounts, Custer Battles was a nightmare contractor in Iraq. The company's two principals, Mike Battles and Scott Custer, overcharged occupation authorities by millions of dollars, according...
Health: Rules to Live (and Die) By
Byline: Anna Kuchment and Eve Conant (With Ramin Setoodeh) Mary Sherry-Connolly, 62, had been meaning to write a living will for the past seven years. But it wasn't until the Terri Schiavo case made headlines last week that she finally picked up...
How to Be a Good Leader; during His Long Career, Welch Mentored a Generation of Future CEOs. in an Exclusive Excerpt, His Rules of the Game
Byline: Jack Welch with Suzy Welch One day, you become a leader. On Monday, you're talking and laughing with colleagues about life and work, and gossiping about how stupid management can be. Then on Tuesday, you are management. You're a boss. Suddenly,...
'I'm Not a Unilateralist'; Paul Wolfowitz Wants the World to Understand Him
Byline: Lally Weymouth With a vote on his nomination to head up the World Bank scheduled for this week, Paul Wolfowitz attempted to calm foreign jitters by speaking out. In an interview with NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth, he discussed his prospective...
Jack on Jack: His Next Chapter; Newly Wed and beyond the Scandals, Welch Is Starting Fresh with a Smart New Book
Byline: Daniel McGinn During 21 years as the chief executive of General Electric, Jack Welch handwrote elaborate appraisals of his subordinates, reviewing what they did well--and what they didn't. Then, upon his retirement in 2001, Welch published...
Like Lambs to Slaughter; Kazuo Ishiguro Talks about His New Novel, a Beautiful and Chilling Book about the Hands of Fate and Science
Byline: Jeff Giles Years ago, Kazuo Ishiguro was giving a reading at a Barnes & Noble in New York City when a helicopter suddenly appeared in the window behind him. It was not a police action, nor was the author, despite "The Remains of the...
Look Who's Not Talking-Still; A New Report Says U.S. Intelligence Agencies Haven't Learned to Share Information, despite Lessons of 9/11
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Daniel Klaidman The Terrorist Threat Integration Center had an imposing name, and a tough mission to match it. Headquartered in a Virginia suburb of Washington, D.C., the agency was created two years ago by President...
My Daughter Is a Vietnam Vet, Too; after Overcoming Incredible Odds to Get Here, Carly Has Shown Us How to Survive the Toughest Times
Byline: Dick Kurth (Kurth lives in Laguna Beach, Calif.) My recollections of the 13 months I spent as a young Marine in Northern I Corps have long since ceased to be inflated or diminished by the decades-long public discussion of Vietnam War. In...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Cathleen McGuigan, David Gates Q&A: CAMERON DIAZ On her new MTV show, called "Trippin," Cameron Diaz and cool celebrity friends go to cool places like Nepal and Chile. Diaz chatted with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Why...
On Hiring, Inspiring
Byline: Jack Welch with Suzy Welch Hiring good people is hard. Hiring great people is brutally hard. Yet nothing matters more in winning than getting the right people on the field, then guiding them on the right way to succeed and get ahead. ...
On Work and Family
Byline: Jack Welch with Suzy Welch If there was ever a case of "Do as I say, not as I did," this is it. No one, myself included, would ever call me an authority on work-life balance. For 41 years, my operating principle was work hard, play hard...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: The Washington Post, washingtonmonthly.com, referencepoint.com, Associated Press, Chicago Tribune, New York Times, Associated Press, The Washington Post, Associated Press, Baltimore Sun "You can't condone this, but you...
Putting It All on the Table; Career Chowhound Ruth Reichl Has No Reservations
Byline: Malcolm Jones Eating lunch with Ruth Reichl at a New York City sushi restaurant, you can see right off why she's so good at what she does. When the former food critic for The New York Times and current editor of Gourmet magazine confronts...
SAT: What's Your Score?
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh It's lunchtime in Iowa City, and after a bite of her veggie sandwich, Wendi Winkie starts reading student papers. But these aren't just any classroom essays--they're from the new SAT, which launched in March with a new writing...
Solo against the Sea; How Ellen MacArthur Fought Waves, Wind and Exhaustion to Break the Round-the-World Record
Byline: Susannah Meadows (With Emily Flynn on the Isle of Wight) Thirteen days into her attempt to set a new record for sailing alone around the globe, Ellen MacArthur discovered that her boat's generator had been burning so much oil it wouldn't...
Take a Look in the Mirror; the Pols Confused Law with Theology and Allowed Tabloidism to Trump Privacy
Byline: Jonathan Alter When he was governor of Texas, George W. Bush presided over 152 executions, more than took place in the rest of the country combined. In at least a few of these cases, reasonable doubts about the guilt of the condemned were...
Tending to Wayward Shepherds; A New Group Seeks Due Process for Accused Priests
Byline: Sarah Childress Joe Maher never knows what to expect when he picks up the phone. Sometimes there's a trembling pause before a priest, choking back tears, tells him a disturbingly familiar tale: an accusation of sexual abuse, exile from his...
Terror: The Hunt for Zarqawi's Webmasters
Byline: Mark Hosenball Intelligence and law-enforcement agencies are learning that tracking down the operators of Islamic terrorist Web sites is like trying to locate a floating craps game: here today, gone tomorrow. During the past year, investigators...
The Culture of Each Life; There Are Those of Us Who Believe That under Certain Conditions the Cruelest Thing You Can Do to Someone You Love Is to Force Them to Live
Byline: Anna Quindlen Please, I imagine myself saying to the editor, don't put that picture of her on the cover. Use the picture from years ago, the one in which she is wearing the print blouse, her hair long, her dark eyes stars behind spiky lashes....
The Dawn of a New Oil Era? China Is the World's Second-Largest Consumer of Oil. It Has about 20 Million Cars and Trucks Now. by the Year 2020, That May Be 120 Million
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The interesting question about the advent of $50-a-barrel oil is whether it signals a new era in the economics and politics of energy. To sharpen the question: have we entered a period when, owing to consistently strong...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Why is it that, four years after his retirement, people still pack lecture halls to hear Jack Welch speak? Why do America's top CEOs still call the former head of General Electric for off-the-record advice? And why, despite...
The Legacy of Terri Schiavo; One Woman's Journey from Marital Bliss to Medical Darkness-And the Forces That Made Her Story a Political and Ethical Watershed
***** CORRECTION: In "The Legacy of Terri Schiavo," we said that Karen Ann Quinlan's feeding tube was removed in 1985. Quinlan was hooked up to a respirator, not a feeding tube, and the respirator was removed in 1976. She remained comatose and connected...
'The President on Line 1'
Byline: Daniel McGinn When NEWSWEEK last sat down with Jack Welch, in December 2000, he'd just picked Jeff Immelt as his successor, and the U.S. Supreme Court had just cemented George W. Bush's presidential victory. At one point, Welch interrupted...