Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 9

Anti-Misogyny Message
Byline: Sarah Childress Hip-hop music has long been criticized for being misogynistic--and now the African-American and hip-hop communities are speaking out. Essence, one of the leading magazines for black women, has launched a yearlong "Take Back...
Aspects of Europe's Mind; Putin Wants to Be President of a Super-Power, but Russia's GDP Is Not Much Bigger Than the Economic Product of Los Angeles County
Byline: George F. Will The greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the century. --Russian President Vladimir Putin on the collapse of the Soviet Union Ultra-liberalism is the new communism of our age. --French President Jacques Chirac on...
A White House Adrift; Gas Prices, Social Security, Tom DeLay. What Else Can Go Wrong for Bush?
Byline: Holly Bailey and Richard Wolffe (With Tamara Lipper) George Voinovich is not your typical Bush loyalist. A self-styled deficit hawk, the former Cleveland mayor and Ohio governor is so frugal that he once fished a penny out of a urinal in...
Blue in a China Shop; Steve Ward Is Still Mr. ThinkPad-Just Not with IBM
Late last year came the shocking news that IBM will be selling its PC business (including the acclaimed ThinkPad notebook franchise) to Lenovo, the leading IT company in China. Though IBM will retain only a 13.4 percent stake in the new enterprise,...
Bolton: Now, the Guessing Game
Byline: Mark Hosenball Senate Dems, still trying to quash the U.N. nomination of John Bolton, are investigating more allegations that Bolton sought to intimidate career officials who disagreed with his hard-line views. The latest hot leads surfaced...
Business: A Jack Welch of Communists; Haier's CEO Aims to Create a Global Brand, Even If He Has to Break a Few Things to Do It
Byline: Sarah Schafer Humiliation was a company tradition. Each day at the Chinese appliance maker Haier, workers lined up on the factory floor before the start of their shift. The supervisor called out the name of the employee who had made the...
Capital Ideas; Closed-End Funds Are Hot, but Cast a Cool Eye on Their Promises
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Looking for a big, fat income stock? Brokers are touting closed-end mutual funds at yields of 8 percent or more. "I'm a skeptic," says Tom Herzfeld, whose eponymous Miami investment firm manages $100 million invested in...
Car Culture: 'We Want to Push the Limits'; These Chinese Road Warriors Seek Fun, Thrills and Freedom. They End Their Journey on a Melting Glacier
Byline: Craig Simons Yuan Jun likes to have his foot on the gas. Wearing rose-colored glasses and a tan aviator vest, he rests one hand on the steering wheel of his Toyota Land Cruiser and holds a CB radio mike in the other. The passing scenery...
Corporate Last Licks; Can Dreyer's, the Largest U.S. Ice-Cream Maker, Figure out How to Market Its Newfangled Low-Fat Product?
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh (With Jennifer Ordonez in Bakersfield, Calif.) On a sunny spring day in southern California, a handful of factory workers are scurrying around in heavy black winter parkas. At the Dreyer's ice cream plant in Bakersfield--where...
Corporate Spim Is No LOL Matter
Byline: Linda Stern Spim is coming of age--and that's not a good thing. These annoying ads are the instant-messaging version of spam, and they chimed in a remarkable 1.2 billion times last year. The average IM user can expect to be interrupted with...
Does the Future Belong to China? A New Power Is Emerging in the East. How America Should Handle Unprecedented New Challenges, Threats-And Opportunities
***** CORRECTION: NEWSWEEK incorrectly reported the number of Wal-Mart's suppliers. The company has over 68,000 suppliers in the U.S. alone. Less than 6 percent of the $137.5 billion Wal-Mart spent last year with suppliers went to China. NEWSWEEK...
Education: The Future Doesn't Speak French; Aware of the Challenges Ahead, American Students Are Rushing to Learn Chinese
Byline: William Lee Adams At Dulles High School in Sugar Land, Texas, the roster for Advanced Chinese V begins with Jason Chao and ends with Kathy Zhang. In between comes an unexpected name: Elizabeth Hoffman. Hoffman, now a 12th grader, began studying...
Fantastic Voyages; Flying around the World, Playing Golf with Jack Nicklaus, Cruising the Antarctic-Nothing's Too Good If You Can Pay
Byline: Scott Johnson Want to rent an island for your honeymoon? How about flying around the world on your own jet, stopping only for the best meals along the way? Or perhaps a three-day stay at a hotel where a round of golf with Jack Nicklaus is...
Film: Invasion of the Hot Movie Stars; Chinese Cinema Has Brought New Fun, Glamour, Humor and Sex Appeal to Hollywood
Byline: Sean Smith (With Melinda Liu in Beijing and Alexandra A. Seno in Hong Kong) Just a few months ago, 26-year-old actress Ziyi Zhang found herself on a panel at the Telluride Film Festival, seated beside Joan Allen, Ellen Barkin, Laura Linney...
Games and Grievances; When Officials Dreamed Up Catchphrases like 'The People's Olympics,' Who Knew the Public Would Take the Words Seriously?
Byline: Melinda Liu Wang Qishan may have imagined that he had foreseen every possible pitfall for the 2008 Olympics--but that was before the World Snooker Tournament came to town. As Beijing's mayor, he was shocked and embarrassed for his city by...
Gitmo: SouthCom Showdown
***** CORRECTION: Headline: Newsweek Statement On Qur'an Story From Editor Mark Whitaker: DATELINE: NEW YORK May 16 NEW YORK, May 16 /PRNewswire/ -- "Based on what we know now, we are retracting our original story that an internal military investigation...
Gossip: Chasing 'Real Celebs'
Byline: Jonathan Darman Publishing high-end society mags like Hamptons Magazine and Los Angeles Confidential, Jason Binn routinely hobnobs with Hollywood celebs and Wall Street kings. Washington's White House Correspondents Dinner, where deputy...
In Search of Privacy; for Wealthy Travelers, Luxury Is a Given. but in an Age of Mass Travel, What They Crave Is Privacy, No Matter the Cost. Might We Interest You in Your Own Hotel?
Byline: William Underhill The artwork on the walls is original, and the butler is on call. There's a choice of pools, a recording studio and a chauffeur-driven Jaguar at the ready. But those are not the reasons the discerning traveler heads for...
Jets for VIPs Only; Forget Business Class. Skip First Class. This Is High Class. the Newest Status Symbol in Asia: Your Own Private Way to Fly
Byline: Alexandra A. Seno Hong Kong's wealthy ladies-who-lunch like their LV (Louis Vuitton) luggage and CD (Christian Dior) handbags. But for those in the know, the hottest travel accessory is the PJ--private jet. Francis Cheng, a marketing executive...
Meet Me for 'Lunchatation'; Bo Dietl Has a Knack for Networking, and It's Helped This Former New York Cop Launch a Multimedia Career
Byline: Jonathan Darman Rao's, the legendary east Harlem Italian eatery, is more than a hundred blocks above Wall Street. But with a clientele that includes some of corporate America's leading lights, big business is never far away. Consider the...
Mom Always Made Room for One More; She Knew What Desperation Felt like, and Never Missed the Chance to Open Her Home to Others
Byline: Bobbi Zehner (Zehner lives in Madison, Wisc.) Looking back to our house on Magnolia Avenue, it seems like someone was always living in our guest room. First, there was Leona, my parents' friend who'd fled an abusive relationship. Then there...
New Angles for Stocks; the Investing Climate May Be Tricky in the Coming Decade. Stocks Might Seesaw as They Have over the Past Five Years, with Wide Swings
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) There's no free lunch. You pay for a few glory years in the stock market with a string of misery years. In the 1980s and 1990s, stock prices rose by an annual average of 14 percent....
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki GOstin, Jeff Giles Mario Batali Chef Mario Batali, with six New York restaurants, a permanent gig on the Food Network and a new cookbook, "Molto Italiano," his fourth, somehow managed a word with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. So,...
New Tool: The Old Telephone; Many Small Businesses Don't Need a Web Site, but Want to Be in Ads on Search Engines. Pay-per-Call Gets Them Online. Want Their Services? Make a Call
Byline: Brad Stone The e-commerce revolution doesn't have much to offer Norman Hersch. The owner of a six-employee San Francisco liquidation firm, Hersch buys damaged goods from importers or insurance companies--say, bottles of wine with smudged...
No Place Left to Hide; Weren't New Media Supposed to Give Us More Control over Advertising? Try Taking a Cab or Riding an Elevator These Days. Intrusions into Everyday Life Know No Boundaries
Byline: Brad Stone Corey Gottlieb was having a lousy day. the ceo of New York City's Targeted Media Partners was in San Francisco last month to install 200 flat-panel TV screens--worth about $3,000 each--into the local Luxor cab fleet. But in tests,...
Not Another PowerPoint Presentation! in the Age of BlackBerrys and Cell Phones, the Traditional Business Meeting May Be Just Another Relic
Byline: T. Trent Gegax The suits and power skirts sitting around the conference table may just as well have been on lunch break. One guy kept stepping away to answer an inconsolable cell phone. A couple of others were frozen in prayerlike formation,...
Not Just Peanuts; Minor-League Baseball Is More Than Quaint Stadiums and Dancing Umpires. It's Now a $500 Million Industry with Nearly 40 Million Fans and 176 Teams
Byline: Alan Schwarz (Schwarz is the senior writer of Baseball America magazine.) Opening night was doomed. A few years ago, rain was pelting down on the Boston suburb of Brockton, leaving fans of the Brockton Rox soggy and despondent. But then,...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Times, Boston Globe, Indianapolis Star, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, Associated Press, Reuters, Clovis (N.M.) News Journal, New York Times "[It's] a big...
Shopping the Pyramid; A Guide to the Government's Latest Nutrition Advice
Byline: Mary Carmichael If the USDA thought it had a winner with its flashy new food pyramid and Web site, it certainly had some early evidence. In its first 24 hours, MyPyramid.gov received 48 million hits--enough traffic to temporarily crash the...
Take This Deal And. Ken Langone Has His Own Big Plans for the Big Board
Byline: Charles Gasparino Ken Langone had more than a passing interest in the news that flashed across the TV screen in his Manhattan office a couple of weeks ago--that the New York Stock Exchange was planning to become a public company by merging...
Targeting Tumors
Byline: Joan Raymond and Geoffrey Cowley Learning you have breast cancer is bad enough, but the diagnosis is doubly devastating for the 20 to 30 percent of patients who turn out to be "HER-2-positive." Tumors carrying that designation grow with...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Beijing was an isolated and dilapidated city when Melinda Liu opened NEWSWEEK's first bureau there in 1980. In those days, she was housed in dreary foreigners' barracks, and had to elude police surveillance to interview rural...
The Problem with Putin; Bush's Moscow Visit Will Be a Trip to Fortress Russia
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Eve Conant She was supposed to be smoothing the way for President George W. Bush's trip to Moscow, a celebration of Hitler's defeat 60 years ago this week. But instead of rekindling the spirit of wartime allies, Secretary...
The Sexes: Gumshoes and 'Mistress-Killers'; Chinese Women Who Want a Divorce-And a Fair Settlement-Are Seeking a Little Help
Byline: Jonathan Ansfield (With Melinda Liu and Grace Liu in Beijing) Ten days after He Yuxiu hired the Sherlock Holmes agency, the firm called with bittersweet news: investigators had found what she was looking for. Get to the guesthouse as soon...
Who's the Weaker Sex?
Byline: Karen Springen Men may earn more than women, run faster and buy more widescreen TVs. But when it comes to health, they trail the opposite sex in nearly every category. Stroke, cancer, diabetes, heart disease and the six other leading causes...