Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 3

A Border War; Tom Tancredo Is Pulling the Immigration Debate to the Right-And Away from Bush
Byline: Holly Bailey (With Daren Briscoe and Richard Wolffe) The lights were on, the cameras were rolling, but the special guest star was nowhere to be found. Last Friday afternoon, 55 men and women from 30 countries sat in a Denver conference room,...
Absentee City, U.S.A. in New Orleans, Chasing Votes Is a Nationwide Manhunt
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Fasten your seat belts if you hope to keep up with the contenders in New Orleans's mayoral race. One recent Saturday, candidate Mitch Landrieu woke up at 6 a.m. to fly 200 miles north to Alexandria, La., where he greeted...
All the Way to the Bank; Spike Lee Scores with the Taut, Entertaining 'Inside Man.'
Byline: David Ansen March is a little on the early side for a Hollywood studio to release a good movie (some years you have to wait until May) but hey, life is full of surprises. "Inside Man," a bank-heist thriller with a tricky, nothing-is-as-it-seems...
Beverly Cleary, Age 90; before Harry and Hermione, There Was "Ramona the Pest"
Byline: Karen Springen and Cathleen McGuigan If you haven't raised a child between the ages of 7 and 11--or been a kid yourself in recent years--you probably don't realize that Beverly Cleary is a phenomenon. One of America's most successful living...
Bloody Good Flicks; Not All Horror Movies Are Splatterfests. in the Hands of the Right Director, They Can Illuminate Our Times-And Psyches
Byline: David Ansen Horror movies don't win Oscars or respect--"The Silence of the Lambs" being the exception that proves the rule--but their bad-seed status has given them a freedom denied to more respectable genres. If the social drama is our...
China's Panda Politics; Sure, They're Darn Cute and Cuddly. but They Might Be Trojan Gifts
Byline: Melinda Liu and George Wehrfritz (With Jamie Reno in San Diego and Eleanor Clift in Washington) They spend most of their lives asleep. They bite. They're absurdly inept at sex. But in the realm of diplomacy, giant pandas have few rivals....
Christians: Embracing the Code
Byline: Elise Soukup Julie Scheving, a 46-year-old resident of Holland, Mich., doesn't believe the decision to open "The Da Vinci Code" on May 19 happened by chance--she believes it was an act of God. The movie opens on her birthday, and Scheving,...
Fast Chat: Home Cooking
Byline: Richard Wolffe Cris Comerford is the first woman to become executive chef at the White House since the Kennedys turned the job into a high-profile statement of personal style. She's also the first Filipino-American to hold the position,...
Healing Powers; African Women Are Starting to Take Charge-Making New Laws, Changing Old Attitudes, Inspiring Others to Follow Their Lead. Who Will Help Them Mend a Broken Continent?
Byline: Joshua Hammer (With Alexandra Polier in Kigali) The national legislature on Monrovia's Capitol Hill is a forlorn wreck of a place, its facade peppered with bullet holes from the country's civil wars, its interior crumbling after two decades...
Horror Show; Scary Movies Are Multiplying Faster Than Ever, and Getting Increasingly Sadistic. Why Are Audiences So Hungry for Blood? Pull Up a Chair. Just Be Careful Which One
Byline: Devin Gordon Once the credits roll and the theater empties, movie marketers go to the same place as the rest of us: the bathroom. Only they go to eavesdrop. "That's where you hear the good s--t," says Tim Palen, co-president of marketing...
Letters to the Magazine; Issue Dated April 3, 2006
A Harrowing Medical Mission in Iraq Our March 20 cover story on Richard Jadick, the doctor who saved the lives of 30 U.S. soldiers in one battle, along with the interviews of some of those who are recovering, elicited many heartfelt letters. The...
My Black Skin Makes My White Coat Vanish; Even in One of the World's Most Diverse Cities, I Have to Convince My Patients That I Am the Doctor
Byline: Mana Lumumba-Kasongo (Kasongo lives in New York City.) The first time it happened I was a brand-spanking-new M.D., filled with an intern's enthusiasm. Proudly wearing my pristine white coat and feeling sure that I was going to save the world,...
Newsmakers; Issue Dated April 3, 2006
Byline: NICKI GOSTIN, Marc Peyser Spike Lee Spike Lee just opened a new thriller, "Inside Man." He spoke with Nicki Gostin. Jodie Foster looks very glam in this movie. I remember the first day she showed up in costume. The first thing out...
On the Road: Young Gay Activists
Byline: Margaret Nelson with Courtney Cloyd Lauren Topliffe, a junior at Oklahoma Baptist University, loves the school "for so many things--academically, spiritually, it's been great for me." But, as a lesbian, she's felt at constant risk--of harassment...
Perspectives
"That will be decided by future presidents." President George W. Bush, on when he expects American forces to fully withdraw from Iraq "This is humiliating for Islam ... Cut off his head." Muslim cleric Abdul Raoulf, on former medical-aid...
Pulp Friction; He Was a Hot Pitchman. Then He Tangled with Tinseltown's Most Notorious Private Eye. 'Scary Movie,' Indeed
Byline: Andrew Murr and Mark Hosenball Bo Zenga's Hollywood tale began like one of those implausibly bright MGM musicals: a plucky unknown from south Jersey moves to Tinseltown with dreams of becoming a big shot. Before you know it, he's selling...
Special Deliveries; Are Doctors Performing Too Many C-Sections?
Byline: Jennifer Barrett A decade ago, cesarean-section births were often a last resort, performed during medical emergencies or after hours of unsuccessful labor. But in recent years, C-sections, in which a baby is extracted through incisions in...
Supreme Court: Detainees' Rights-Scalia Speaks His Mind
Byline: Michael Isikoff The Supreme Court this week will hear arguments in a big case: whether to allow the Bush administration to try GuantAnamo detainees in special military tribunals with limited rights for the accused. But Justice Antonin Scalia...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker When Stewart Butterfield began working on the photo-sharing Web site that would become Flickr, one of the first journalists he showed it to was Steven Levy. Butterfield had read Steven's book "Artificial Life" while studying...
The Market's Up. Compared to What?
Byline: Allan Sloan Spring is in the air, college basketball's on TV, the stock market's rising. What's not to like? Not only are the Dow Jones industrials, Standard & Poor's 500 and NASDAQ market all up nicely for the year, but every few days,...
The New Hot Zones; Books, Films and a Slick Ad Campaign Make Global Warming the Topic Du Jour
Byline: Jerry Adler (With Karen Breslau and Vanessa Juarez) In the din and clamor of issues competing for public attention, there's an inner circle of causes that virtually define good citizenship. Who would argue that a mind isn't a terrible thing...
The New Wisdom of the Web; Why Is Everyone So Happy in Silicon Valley Again? A New Wave of Start-Ups Are Cashing in on the Next Stage of the Internet. and This Time, It's All about ... You
Byline: Steven Levy and Brad Stone A little over two years ago, even the most sensitive entrepreneurial radar could not pick out two pairs of people on opposite ends of the West Coast starting companies that would make plenty out of nothing. In...
The Politics of Make-Believe; the Student Protesters in France Think That If They March Long Enough or Burn Enough Cars, They Can Make the Future Go Away. No Such Luck
Byline: Robert Samuelson To anyone who cares about Europe's future, the French demonstrations and street riots protesting the government's new labor law must be profoundly disturbing. It's the French against France--a familiar ritual that mirrors...
Who's Building the Next Web? Got a Lot of Free Time? You're Going to Need It to Enjoy the Fruits of Silicon Valley's Latest Labors: Start-Ups That Want You to Spend Even More of Your Life Online
Byline: Brad Stone and Steven Levy Deciphering the exact meaning of the phrase Web 2.0 is a popular parlor game in Silicon Valley. The expression can stand for many things--the kind of start-up that forges new connections among Web users, lets them...