Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 8

A Guarantee? It'll Cost You; There's Magic in the Idea of a Check for Life, Where the Dollar Amount Can Rise but Never Fall. but Now Comes the Question of What You'll Pay for It
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) I hear you're looking for investment guarantees. You want your retirement money to grow but without the risk of market loss. To make you happy, new "safety net" products are blooming...
Back on the Stand; Rove's Latest Trip to the Grand Jury Leaves His Fate in the Plame Leak Case as Mysterious as Ever
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Evan Thomas (With Mark Hosenball) It was August 2004, and special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald was zeroing in on I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby as the leaker in the Valerie Plame case. Fitzgerald had been quizzing reporters,...
Health: Does 'Milk' Hurt Kids?
Byline: Mary Carmichael In 1997, Kelley Scanlon, an epidemiologist, and her colleagues at the Centers for Disease Control received a call from Georgia health authorities with disturbing news. The parents of two infants had weaned their babies onto...
'I Demand a Timetable'; Moqtada Al-Sadr on War, Peace and Occupation
Byline: Scott Johnson Variously described as a populist Shia cleric, a violent militia leader and a political kingmaker, Moqtada al-Sadr is all of the above. His growing power--and his stance against the American occupation--helped impede the formation...
Iran: A Rummy Guide; to Borrow a Phrase Used for Iraq, There Are 'Things We Now Know We Don't Know.' NEWSWEEK Sorts It Out
Byline: Christopher Dickey and John Barry (With Kevin Peraino in Jerusalem and Mark Hosenball and Dan Ephron in Washington) Back in June 2002, as the Bush administration started pushing hard for war with Iraq by focusing on fears of the unknown--terrorists...
'I Want to See Most of the Planet Online'
Byline: Brad Stone In 2000, Sun Microsystems billed itself as the "dot in dot.com," the firm whose technology powered the first generation of Internet firms. But when many of its customers went broke or pulled back during the bust, Sun's revenues...
Many Strange 'Emergencies'; A Poll Shows That Approval of the Job Congress Is Doing Has Plunged to Just 22 Percent. One Wonders: Who Are Those 22 Percent?
Byline: George F. Will Before 1977, no snowstorm had ever been declared a federal disaster by a U.S. president. Twelve inches of powder overnight in Syracuse? We've handled that sort of thing for generations without hand-wringing on CNN. Then, in...
Mideast: No Money for Hamas
Byline: Dan Ephron After the Islamic Hamas group swept to office in the West Bank and Gaza Strip earlier this year, one of Washington's first moves was to halt most aid to the Palestinian Authority. Now the United States is working to ensure no...
Mission: Possible? Paramount CEO Brad Grey Is Racing to Turn around His Struggling Studio. Now His Involvement with the Affair Pellicano Is Making His Task a Lot More Difficult
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts In March 2005, Brad Grey, the heavyweight producer of "The Sopranos," chose to accept a difficult mission--to become CEO of Paramount Pictures and mastermind its rebound. He began triumphantly enough. In his first and...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Marc Peyser Miley and Billy Ray Billy Ray Cyrus and his daughter Miley play dad and daughter in Disney's new hit show "Hannah Montana." The duo spoke to NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Billy Ray, is it true you didn't think...
OK, You've Almost Sold US; How Could We Leave out 'X-Men'? Didn't We Hear the Kinda Good Buzz on 'Poseidon'?! More Worthy Movies-And Our Reservations
Poseidon: Wolfgang Petersen dredges up the '70s disaster genre for this Titanically expensive rethinking of "The Poseidon Adventure." Nagging question: With no Shelley Winters in sight, will it be any fun? MAY 12 X-Men: The Last Stand: In installment...
Osama Needs More Mud Huts; Global Islamic Terrorism Is the Product of Scattered Groups. It Has Much Less Support in the Muslim World Than People Think
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) Imagine if a few months after September 11 someone had said to you, "Five years from now, in the space of a single week, Osama bin Laden will issue a new call for worldwide...
Perspectives
"There is a Zionist-Crusaders war on Islam." Osama bin Laden, criticizing Western efforts to isolate the Hamas-led Palestinian government, from a newly released audiotape "Americans should know ... if they invade Iran, their interests around...
Politics: New Orleans: Wooing the White Vote
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Hardy Fowler is not one to waver. The managing partner of KPMG's New Orleans office, he's accustomed to the business world's demands for decisiveness. But when it comes to choosing a candidate in the Big Easy's mayoral...
Q&A: This Summer's Stars; NEWSWEEK Talks to Headliners from 5 Upcoming Films
Byline: Devin Gordon, Sean Smith TOM HANKS You are familiar with his work, possibly. And possibly you are also familiar with "The Da Vinci Code," the novel upon which his new movie is based. Hanks spoke with Devin Gordon. How do you soothe...
Rehabbing Rush; A High-Profile Probe of Painkiller Addiction Ends with a Slap on the Wrist. Inside Limbaugh's Road to Recovery
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores and Evan Thomas (With Mark Hosenball) Rush was on a roll. He made fun of polling showing that Hillary Clinton has a higher rating when she uses the last name Rodham instead of Clinton. He lambasted a Republican proposal...
Russian Roulette for Unflinching Investors
Byline: Allan Sloan Ah, May, that glorious month when spring is upon us. A month that used to start with Russia's unveiling its newest and biggest weapons at an enormous parade celebrating communism. So there's no better time for us to examine the...
Summer Movie Preview: Hollywood's 15 Most Wanted; Blockbusters Are like Candy: You Can Enjoy a Few, but Pretty Soon You Need Some Real Nourishment. Here, in Order, Are the Summer Films That We're Most Excited About-Big or Small, Right or Wrong
Byline: Devin Gordon, Sean Smith and David Ansen three years ago, almost everyone predicted that "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl" would be a cheesy also-ran in the big summer box-office race. Pirate movies had tanked for...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker As we were closing the magazine last week, our Media Relations Manager, Jan Angilella, received an urgent call from The Dallas Morning News. Was it true, they wanted to know, that NEWSWEEK's annual list of America's Best High...
The Oil Factor; Our Columnist on Why Gas Prices Are Soaring-And Why They Haven't Hurt the Brisk U.S. Economy. Yet
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The United States has the energy policy it deserves, although not the one that it needs. Having been told for years that their addiction to cheap gasoline was on a collision course with increasingly insecure supplies...
The Public Elites
NEWSWEEK excluded these high performers from the list of Best High Schools because so many of their students score well above average on the SAT and ACT. Benjamin Franklin Senior H.S., NEW ORLEANS: A rigorous high school with competitive admission....
This Week Online
Byline: Jac Chebatoris; For Jac Chebatoris's full interview and for clips from the new CD, go to xtra.NEWSWEEK.com on MSNBC NEWSWEEK: The musical community in New Orleans is such a tight-knit group. How has it been affected by Katrina? Irma Thomas,...
What Does It Take to Coach Girls' Track? Once I Thought It Was as Simple as Sharing My Enthusiasm for Running, but Now I Know Better
Byline: Linda Head Flanagan (Flanagan lives in Summit, N.J.) I'm not going to the track!" The teenager threw herself to the floor and pounded her fists. "I had tacos and ice cream for lunch!" I told her we needed to do a hard workout of halves and...
What Makes a High School Great; Gold Stars: The Answer Depends on the School, and the Student. with Its Annual List, NEWSWEEK Honors Top Schools That Help Regular Kids Succeed in College
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Pat Wingert (With Dan Brillman, Michal Lumsden, Le Datta Grimes and Dave Kotok) If you want to understand what's happening in some of America's most innovative public high schools, think back to your own experiences...
Whistling Dixie; Mark Warner Test-Drives a New Strategy for the Dems in '06
Byline: Jonathan Darman When you're an out-of-work Southern governor with time on your hands and your eye on the presidency, driving a NASCAR pace car around a deserted speedway should probably come naturally. Or at least it did for former Virginia...
White House: A Mind of His Own; Tony Snow Says What He Thinks. Which Is Why the Press Is Excited-And Fans of Message Discipline Are on Edge
Byline: Holly Bailey and Richard Wolffe It started as a lunch between old colleagues--and ended as a job interview. Tony Snow and Josh Bolten had been friendly for years. The two worked together in George H.W. Bush's White House and had kept in...
Why AP Matters; Test Wars: Behind the Debate over How We Should Judge High Schools
Byline: Jay Mathews On the surface, Fanny Frausto looks like any other teenager laughing and jostling in the crowded halls of one of America's urban public high schools. It is only when asked about her schoolwork that Frausto, 18, begins to sound...