Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 10, September 7

An Endless Investigation
Hard evidence makes it the world's best-known drunken-driving case. But loose ends nourish conspiracy theories. The communique from the Paris court was terse. The first anniversary of Princess Diana's death was at hand, but not the final results of...
A Windfall for Charity?
Diana's death generated shock, controversy--and millions of dollars for charity. The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, run by a board of trustees headed by Diana's sister Lady Sarah McCorquodale, has brought in $140 million to date. Critics carp...
A World Meltdown?
Stock markets aren't just nervous about Russia. Recent selloffs reflect fears that massive capital flight may trigger a global recession. It is time to stop pretending that the "economic crisis" is an "Asian crisis" or a "Japanese crisis" or a "Russian...
Born to Win-With a Little Help
Is there a magic formula for raising a successful child? Or is biology destiny? Some famous names talk about the people who made them what they are. Family was his inspiration I think Freud would laugh at the idea of parents' being irrelevant. I know...
Dancing in the Darkness
As Ken Starr sprints to the finish, the pols and the lawyers wonder what he has--and jockey for position It's crunch time in ken Starr's office. Working out of the independent counsel's redoubt just blocks from the White House, Starr's lawyers are laboring...
Give It the New College Try
State savings plans are unglamorous--but attractive. The smart money thumbs its nose at state college savings programs. Stocks are the only place for campus-bound cash, it says. But with the Dow stumbling through assorted global crises, these unsexy...
Is This Any Time for a Summit?
This week, Clinton and Yeltsin will engage in what's certainly the strangest session Russia and America have ever attempted. "My buddy bill," boris Yeltsin called him. Bill Clinton certainly tried to be. They bonded immediately in 1992, during the presidential...
Lost Behind Prison Bars
Despite racial progress, too many African-Americans are in jail. A way to change that. In the past 20 years, a black man has chaired the Joint Chiefs of Staff, another has headed the Ford Foundation and still another has made two serious bids for his...
McGwire's Power Supply
Is the home-run king's muscle builder fair or foul? A windup, a pitch and a flash of blond wood. Crack! Mark McGwire has hit another towering homer. In his race to break Roger Maris's record of 61 home runs in a season, the St. Louis Cardinals slugger...
Moscow's Real Rulers
Facing ruin, the oligarchs want to be bailed out Boris nemtsov is now a rueful reformer. in mid-august, nemtsov, then a deputy prime minister, told Newsweek he was not afraid to take on the "oligarchs," a small group of shady tycoons who had helped...
October
Movies Holy Man. Eddie Murphy, Jeff Goldblum, Kelly Preston. Dir. Stephen Herek. A TV home-shopping network turns to televangelism. Antz. The first of this fall's two animated bug flicks. A worker ant loves a princess and leads a revolution. Voices:...
Papa's Got a Brand-New Book
Once famous for his taciturn style, the posthumous Ernest Hemingway can't seem to shut up. Since his suicide in 1961, we have seen the publication of the memoir "A Moveable Feast" and the novels "Islands in the Stream" and "The Garden of Eden." And next...
Rumble on the Ramps
A show of motorcycles is the biggest hit ever at the Guggenheim Museum. Does this mean art is dead? All summer long, record crowds have streamed into the Guggenheim Museum's famous spiral-ramp building by Frank Lloyd Wright in New York. They've been...
Russian Roulette
A total collapse of the ruble sendsworld markets into chaos--and pushes Yeltsin to the brink. For days he sat listlessly in his dacha an hour from Moscow, attended only by his wife, occasionally his daughter, and a handful of aides. Outside, in the...
September
Movies Rounders. Matt Damon, Edward Norton. Dir. John Dahl. Two poker hustlers on the make and on the run. Norton, who plays the sleazier one, should hit the jackpot. Touch of Evil. Janet Leigh, Charlton Heston, Marlene Dietrich, Orson Welles. Dir....
Sifting the Rubble
Last week's blowoff may have created some bargains for gutsy contrarians. Sure, it's hard to gin up much enthusiasm for a stock market that can give up 6 percent in two days. But some money managers say the silver lining in last week's cloud over the...
So Much for Globalization
We believed that free markets and democracy would prevail after communism. The turmoil in Russia has shattered our faith. The post-cold-war world ended last week. we have lived in it comfortably--complacently--for almost a decade. Peace and prosperity...
The Best-Laid Plans
Victories and possible mistakes in the terror war For a brief, gratifying moment last week, the Clinton administration appeared to be winning its war on terrorism. In Washington, during an all-star media event that included Secretary of State Madeleine...
The Lady in Waiting
Camilla Parker Bowles, who has loved Charles for 25 years, is slowly gaining public acceptance. But their relationship stays mostly in the shadows. Prince Charles and the woman he once called his "touchstone," Camilla Parker Bowles, are alike in some...
The Man Who'd Be a Mogul
Has Barry Diller finally built the media empire he's always wanted? Barry Diller has seen the fu-ture of television, and it has lips. Since June, talking-head TV-news anchors have been partly sidelined at Diller's WAMI station in Miami's hip South Beach,...
The Storms of August
Hurricane season arrived with a vengeance. From border villages to coastal resorts, the summer storms smashed property and dreams. It wasn't long ago that much of the country was whining about the hot, dry summer. The first Atlantic storms of 1998 reminded...
Why Diana Moved Us So
One year ago, the death of a princess brought an entire world to tears. The wounds are slowly healing; the grief is less painful. What remains are the lessons that can be learned from a phenomenon that few can entirely forget. At the time it was a mystery....
Yes, Markets Go Down
Russia's economic crisis looms large in investor psychology. But for some time, this market has been a lot shakier than it looks. Think of last week's stock- market carnage as Russia's revenge. We trashed Russia's overstressed economy in the 1980s and...