Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 39, September 28

Ants in Their Pants
DreamWorks and Pixar anxiously await the war of the insect movies. This fall won't be a picnic. It's long been suspected that hol-lywood executives share one brain--and not a terribly big one at that. Last year there was the surreal spectacle of dueling...
A Starr-Crossed Probe
How the prosecutor struck out--except for Monica. Ken starr never wanted his report to Congress to be just about sex and lies. He hoped it would be a sweeping document, one that would show Bill Clinton engaged in a pattern of misconduct and cover-ups....
At Last, a Really Big Mac
The iMac is a great way for novices to get online The elegant simplicity of the Macintosh operating system won me over years ago, and I'm now on my third Mac at home. But it has been a struggle to stay true the last few years. As Apple's share of the...
A War on Many Fronts
So much for the gravitas of the Watergate era--this time around, Washington is a city under siege. Impeachment-related skirmishes are breaking out among bitter foes and former friends alike: Kendall against starr No professional courtesy here. Kendall...
Clinton on the Couch
The view from the therapists: he needs help. The family history was all too familiar. The absent father, the controlling mother, the alcoholism and denial. As psychologists around the country thumbed through the Starr Report, they saw in President Clinton...
Does Managed Care Work?
HMOs deliver some of the best health care money can buy--and some of the worst. Why do they succeed and fail? And how can you pick a winner? Dream a dream of the perfect health plan. Its phone lines would be wide open. Its doctors would be brilliant...
Eisner's Resume: A Rapid Rise
Eisner's meteoric entertainment career has been the product of timing, luck--and a keen eye for programming. l Summer 1962 Page at NBC. "During the summer of my junior year mostly because my father knew Bobby Sarnoff, president of NBC." l Fall 1964 Unemployed....
Having It All
Americans want the impossible when it comes to health care. If you want an end to thehealth-care debate--don't hold your breath. It won't happen now. It won't happen 50 years from now. This is not because our politicians are incompetent, although they...
'I'm No Longer Satisfied Being Eisner & Son'
Eisner won the job as chairman of Disney in 1984 with the help of another contender, Frank Wells of Warner Bros., who deferred to Eisner's creative talents and took the second slot as president. Among their first hires was Jeffrey Katzenberg--10 years...
Legacy of a Healed Hater George Wallace, 1918-1998
He began as a fighter. his father bought him boxing gloves when he was 10, and the small boy--he rose to only 5 feet 6 inches as a man--would spar with his brothers in tiny Clio, Ala. Later, Wallace would win Golden Gloves titles and lead his college...
Legalities, Tonalities
Clinton's fate will turn on embarrassment about having him at the center of civic life Three years ago the president urged adults to think. On Aug. 11, 1995, in an MTV interview he said: "I would hope every American adult, even those who smoke, would...
Out of Control
Slime Time: In the capital, nobody's safe--and nobody knows where it will all end. Henry hyde was alone in his office with his law books and his cigars when an aide burst in with the news. An Internet magazine with close ties to the White House was...
Ranking the Health Plans
Newsweek's annual survey gauges how well HMOs are serving their members For newsweek's third annual ranking of managed-care plans, we surveyed more than 200 plans about practices that are known to improve families' health. Our rankings cover both classic...
Ready for Prime Time?
At long last, HDTV is here--sort of. Living on the cutting edge has its price. For videophiles, it starts around $6,000. That's what it costs to take home the Next Big Thing in home entertainment: high-definition television. Yes, at long last, HDTV...
Reinventing Medicare
The government readies its new 'Choice' plan--but will seniors understand it? In november, medicare takes the first step toward what will be a historic change, and tens of thousands of older people won't know what hit them. New types of senior health...
Shaming the Shameless
What should we do with the 'Big Creep'? Censure him before it all gets even worse. More than 100 american newspapers--including the Chicago Tribune, The Philadelphia Inquirer and USA Today--now believe President Clinton should resign. That's wishful...
Tale of the Tape
The Lying Game: Commanders in chief make bad clients. The story behind Clinton's truth twisting. By most estimates, president clinton has run up well over $5 million in legal fees trying to defend himself from Paula Jones and Ken Starr. Yet informed...
The New Breed of Salon
The magazine that broke the Hyde story could thrive only on the Internet. The online magazine Salon may be virtual, but its editors worry that the death threats pouring in these days are real. Thus a security guard sits outside the San Francisco offices...
The Road to Repentance
Clinton's Clergy: To get his moral footing back, the president sets up an 'accountability group.' Is this an honest effort to get right with God, or just evangelical group therapy? So now the white house, the locus of his no-longer-secret sins, is to...
The Showdown Ahead
North Korea's nuke program sets off alarms Madeleine albright was at a loss for words. In August, the secretary of State went to Capitol Hill for a classified briefing. The topic: North Korea's secret nuclear-weapons program. The administration had...