Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 5, February 1

A Man with Enemies
New charges dog Holbrooke's bid to be U.N. ambassador. Who in Washington is out to get him? It was a typical tour de Holbrooke. He had recently resigned from the State Department, heralded by one and all as the peacemaker of Bosnia, when in 1996...
Clock of Ages
A legendary computer scientist is building a monumental timepiece designed to last 10,000 years. Yes, he's serious. To danny hillis, the pointof building a millennium clock-a monumental device that ticks annually, chimes every thousand years and...
Finally, the Free Lunch?
A new drug blocks absorption of dietary fat The holy grail of diet drugs is simple in conception-a pill that stops the body from absorbing calories from food after it's been eaten, not just supplementing willpower, but making willpower unnecessary....
Finding the Inner Swine
Maxim magazine says guys care only about breasts and beer. Its competitors are shocked. Checking out this article, aren'tyou? Our pointexactly. This couldbe a very short story, in fact-we wouldn't want to tax you-because the point is pretty simple....
Here's the Story (We Think)
Be warned! What follows are called "spoilers" on the Web-prequel plot points that some fans kill for and others avoid. Our unofficial source: fanboys. See how it all meshes with the originals. The Phantom Menace Look, we're not kidding: if you...
Heroin High
It wasn't just 'bad kids.' Cheerleaders, football players and preppies in Plano, Texas, were using heroin-and dying. Inside a three-year drug war. Debbie marsten can tell you exactly how her son became a statistic. On Nov. 12, 1998, she and her...
Letters
A Heady Matter Thank you, Newsweek, for bringing attention to "The New War Against Migraines" (society, Jan. 11). I have suffered from these debilitating headaches since the age of 12 (I am now 59). There was no relief to be found from these "bad...
Looking for a Steady Hand
The GOP is leaderless. For the first time in a generation, there is no heir apparent. Can any of these potential 2000 candidates give the party the direction it needs? It won't be easy: the war within the ranks is growing. A look at the leaders who...
Making a Killing
Forget how big the box office will be. The merch sales are galactic. Like the death star closing in on the Rebel Base, the goodies for Episode I are ready to attack. Two of the first three toys have been in stores for three months, selling like...
No More Fun and Games
A culture of excess and entitlement helped create the scandal that has engulfed the Olympics. Can the man at the top survive a growing chorus for reform? He likes to be called "excellency." He accumulates titles; he's a Spanish marquis who served...
Perspectives
"I'm kind of known for something that's not so great to be known for." Monica Lewinsky, turning away an autograph seeker at the Los Angeles airport "Steve's been a famous football player. I'm a single mother. We're an example of the diversity...
Playing the Gipper Card
Clinton's Reaganesque mastery of the political arts lets him look large-and his enemies small Historians may conclude that it ended in the same way another, infinitely more noble chapter of American history began-with a black woman named Rosa Parks...
Pluto? Try 'Trans-Neptunian Object.'
Stocks get thrown off the S&P 500 and socialites get knocked off the A list, but never in the history of the solar system has there been a demotion like this: astronomers are taking steps to delete Pluto from the list of planets. No, the smallest...
Pulling Back the Curtain
Who's behind a right-wing group with racist views that's ensnared pols from both parties? No one would ever accuse Mike Moore of being a white supremacist. Mississippi's attorney general recently reopened-and won-a 33-year-old murder case against...
The Greed for Speed
Silicon Valley's latest billion-dollar deal For george bell, novemberwas the cruelest month. The chief executive of Excite, a Web portal site, could only stand on the sidelines as America Online swallowed Netscape, the browser baron he once hankered...
The Price of Smoking
I finally kicked the habit after 50 years, but I couldn't escape lung cancer and emphysema I'm not going to waste your time trying to persuade you to quit smoking. You've already heard or read all of the reasons that you shouldn't light up. You've...
The Virtues of Simplicity
Too many retirement plans to choose from, and too many rules, may be putting savers off To get through congress, any plan for social Security reform will apparently have to be tied to a tax-favored retirement account. In the words of my favorite...
Waiting for Star Wars
The prequel won't bow till May, but frenzied fans have already gridlocked the Net and pieced together the secret plot. In the annals of "star wars" legend, the young rogue Scorpio ranks well below the likes of Yoda, Chewbacca and R2-D2. But he's...
Washington's Math Problem
Clinton's plan to save Social Security with the surplus sounds great- until you run the numbers. The reality behind the rhetoric. If you listened to president clinton's State of the Union Message last week, you might have wondered why "saving" Social...