Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 23, December 6

A Fiennes Romance This Is: He's a Leading Man Who Defies Expectations
Ralph Fiennes had already been nominated for one Oscar when he got a second nomination for "The English Patient." But he also got something else with the role: the kind of idolatry that women usually reserve for screen heroes with abashed grins, who...
A Matter of Lost Souls and Savings: Thousands of Baptists Lose Money, in Church
When Tucson businessman Paul Moses needed a place to park his retirement money, the issue was what you'd expect it to be--trust. And who better to put your faith in than your own church? So Moses invested $40,000 in an "Easy Access" account with the...
A Message, but Still No Answers: Mars Mystery: A Stray Rock from the Red Planet Fell to Earth 11,000 Years Ago. What Does It Really Tell Us?
The grapefruit-size chunk of basalt crashed into Antarctica about 11,000 years ago, 17 million years after its liberation from the surface of Mars. Geologists recovered the meteorite, known as ALH84001, in 1984, but the unusual rock's significance...
A Prescriptive Palette: Researchers Say the Pigments That Give Foods Their Color Also Can Cut Cancer and Heart-Disease Risk, and Ease the Pain of Arthritis
Bernie Tennes has a favorite arthritis remedy--tart red cherry juice. "I drink it religiously, a glass a day," says Tennes, 62. It's a cure he discovered almost by accident. At the Country Mill farm market he owns in Charlotte, Mich., Tennes noticed...
Blowing the Whistle at Pru: Has Justice Been Done for the Thousands of Victims of Mis-Sold Life-Insurance Policies?
What's the best way of righting a massive financial wrong? I'm thinking of the dishonest life-insurance selling that stained the 1980s and early 1990s. Several insurers settled national class-action lawsuits--among them New York Life, John Hancock,...
Can We Become Caught in the Web? Psychologists and Pundits Hype 'Internet Addiction.' My Own Online Existence Is Much More Complex
I've lived and worked on the Internet for nine years now. At first, the online world threatened to engulf me. But now it has made possible a life I love and couldn't sustain any other way. I have an intense relationship with the Net. Because my...
Easy Street Looks like a Dead End: South African Blacks Aim to Take Control of Their Economy. but They've Learned the Hard Way That Get-Rich-Quick Schemes Just Don't Work
Apartheid was so much more than some awful nightmare to be shaken off in freedom's first light. Yet in that euphoric moment in 1994 when Nelson Mandela finally came to power, decades of racial inequality seemed negated by the power of good will. Apartheid,...
Hillary Makes Her Move: Rattled by Rumors That She Was Cooling to Her Campaign, the First Lady Vows to Settle in New York and Run Hard
Her Senate campaign hadn't even formally begun, and already it was rumored to be in trouble. Hillary Clinton's poll numbers were dropping, her Washington-based advisers were under fire from local pols and--worst of all--fund-raising was said to be...
Hollywood's Big Art Deal: A Hot Young Crop of Los Angeles Artists Is Spawning a Feeding Frenzy among the City's Mogul-Collectors
Every Saturday afternoon, the fledgling contemporary-art dealers at 6150 Wilshire Boulevard--just west of the L.A. County Museum of Art on the old "Miracle Mile"--gather in the courtyard outside their cluster of tailored, track-lighted white boxes...
Hollywood's Latest Cause: Can a Pack of Celebrities Save Afghanistan's Women?
Mavis Leno, wife of Jay, doesn't play the celebrity game. You don't see her working the tables at Mortons or schmoozing at Vanity Fair's Oscar party. But late last year she made an appearance on "Larry King Live," husband in tow. A month later People...
Now, This Should Get Your Goat: Pashmina Has Holiday Buzz, and a Little Secret
Pashmina shawls, exquisitely dyed and light to the touch, are this shopping season's must-have. Pashmina people will tell you that the fiber is the finest form of cashmere there is, and worth the high price ($500-plus for a high-end shawl) because...
Perspectives
"The answer is yes." Hillary Rodham Clinton, confirming her New York senatorial candidacy, as well as plans to move into her new home in Chappaqua while the president finishes his term in the White House "No one can force you to forget what was...
Sharks Up Close: Stunningly Diverse and Increasingly Endangered, Sharks Have Intrigued Us for Ages. in a Book of Photographs Gleaned from 25 Years of Diving, Jeffrey Rotman Gives Us New Views of These Frightening and Beautiful Creatures
When I first started out as an underwater photographer in 1974, sharks made me quite apprehensive: after all, they're some of the largest, most ferocious animals you're ever likely to encounter as a diver. But as I swam with them I became less scared...
Taking a Real Beating: Many Mexican Boxers Cross the Border Full of Hope, and Wind Up on the Canvas-Or Worse
In Piedras Negras, a peaceful Mexican town on the Texas border, most people work in the maquiladoras. For the dreamers, there are the boxing gyms. Taped to the gym walls, among the pinups, the miniature shrines to the Virgin of Guadalupe and the life-size...
The Genuine Articles?
A majority of readers who commented on our Nov. 15 cover story, "Straight Shooters," were excited about the two "authentic" candidates. "A Bradley-McCain contest in November would go a long way toward restoring faith in the presidency," wrote one....
The Holy Men of Heroin: Afghanistan Has Been Ruined by War. but It Does One Job Better Than Anyplace Else in the World: Produce Opium
Zuber has a gaze that's a little too steady. Taken together with his bushy black beard, shaved head and tan shalwar kamiz--the pajamalike clothes that Afghan men wear--the effect is unsettling. He looks like one of those Afghans who's seen too much...
The Main Men in Her Life: How the First Lady's Plunge Will Affect Her Husband-And His Chosen Heir
At a recent focus group of Westchester swing voters, heads nodded as a woman summarized Hillary Clinton's biggest campaign liability in one word: him. But if it's hard to win with Bill Clinton, Hillary can't win without him, either. She needs the president...
The One-Size Dose Does Not Fit All: Physicians and Patients Should Look beyond the Guidelines Recommended by Drug Manufacturers
When I began prescribing Prozac 10 years ago, I found that about half my patients responded well while the other half didn't. One woman became psychotic within five days. Another developed panic attacks so severe she couldn't work. Though I'd given...
The Red Planet Takes a Bow: Space Age: Why Tinseltown's Got a Case of Mars Fever
When the folks at the Mars Society asked James Cameron to speak at their annual convention this year, they probably expected him to be polite. Instead, the "Titanic" director stood before them and asked, "Why the hell do you wackos want to go to Mars?"...
The Sage of Indianapolis: Don't Call It 'India-No-Place'-Its Mayor Is Now Bush's Guru
Stephen Goldsmith has discovered a new gadget: a headset for his mobile phone. He slips the phone in his pocket and straps on the earphone. That leaves his arms free to gesture emphatically, something he does all the time as George W. Bush's chief...
The Search for Life: If All Goes Well, Polar Lander Will Search the Red Planet This Week for Clues That Mars Once Had Abundant Water and Therefore, Just Maybe, Life. the Finds May Help Solve an Ancient Mystery: Are We Alone?
The table in Sarah Gavit's compact, sunny office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., is strewn with a dozen bruised and battered hunks of metal, most of them shaped like big bullets. "You're looking at a museum here," she says--a...
Trolling for Fresh Ideas: Two Web Talent Searches
It isn't easy to break into the entertainment world, and the folks who work there like it that way. There's already too much to listen to and too much to read. So toss out the demo tape you made in the garage. And that goopy coming-of-age script you...
Who's Afraid of Dickie Scruggs? Answer: Corporate America. with Powerful Friends and a Novel Legal Strategy, This Smooth Southern Litigator Helped Bring Big Tobacco to Its Knees. Now He's Going after HMOs. Critics Say He's Abusing the System to Get Rich. but Scruggs Says He's Simply Doing Well by Doing Good
The paparazzi start shooting as Al Pacino, dressed entirely in black, ambles down the red carpet into Manhattan's Ziegfeld Theater for the gala premiere of "The Insider.'' But in the theater lobby, it's a less familiar face that is attracting a crowd....
Why It's Time to Let Loose: The First Lady Must Cut the Platitudes, Open Up and Start Acting like a Real Politician
To hear all the New York nattering, Hillary Clinton is a sure loser next November against Rudy Giuliani. Her defeat is now so presumed that some New Yorkers were surprised last week when she announced she intended to run, even though she never gave...
Why We Should Go to Mars: The Case for Manned Missions: A Renowned Science-Fiction Author Says We Can-And Should-Take on the Challenge
The reasons for sending humans to Mars range from good to bad to terrible. The notion that we should take on such a dangerous and expensive endeavor just so an elite remnant of Earthlings might survive if we destroy ourselves here on our own planet,...