Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 29

A Life or Death Gamble: When the Stakes Are Capital Punishment, How Much Evidence Is Enough? as the Pace of Executions Grows, Prisoners in Most States Go through the Courts without Access to DNA Tests, the Modern Equivalent of Fingerprints. A New Debate about the Fairness of a Death Sentence
You would think that if technology is available to prove absolute guilt or innocence, prosecutors and politicians would all be quick to embrace it, if only to sleep easier at night. You would be wrong. In recent years, DNA testing has freed 72...
A Revival of Federalism? A Bold Supreme Court Decision Last Week Added Fuel to a Constitutional Counterrevolution
Last week the Supreme Court, for the second time in six years (each time by a 5-4 vote), rendered a decision that demonstrates the remarkable continuity of America's political arguments. To see the potential importance of what the court did, consider...
A Season of Shame: In Record Numbers, Professional Athletes Are Winding Up in Trouble - or in Jail. How the Streets Stole the Ball
As he turned 25 years old last week in an Atlanta courtroom at his own murder trial, football star Ray Lewis wasn't looking much like a hero. Wearing a sober suit, he scribbled notes on a yellow legal pad and talked to his defense team, barely glancing...
Boot Camp for Start-Ups: A Survival Course for the Newly Scary Tech Economy
The first IPO boot camp, held one year ago, featured zero jumping jacks and little pain. CEOs and CFOs of local Internet start-ups flocked to a ritzy conference facility on Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, Calif., to learn the ins and outs of riding the...
Can He Get a Woo Woo? Tom Cruise Recruits Hong Kong's Hot Action Director
John Woo almost died of an infection at the age of 3. The doctor told Woo's father that he should have another kid, that there was no hope for this one. Instead, his father spent all the money he had on a Western doctor, curing Woo and plunging the...
Coexisting with China: Greater Trade a Good Thing Is Being Oversold as a Cornerstone of American Foreign Policy
Ever since the end of the cold war, the United States has searched for an organizing principle for its foreign policy. We seem to have found one in trade. It promotes (we believe) political as well as economic progress. It pries open closed societies,...
Critical Moment
Our Opinionated Guide from One to Five Stars MUSIC Whitney Houston, 'The Greatest Hits' (Arista, 2 CDs) After all the tabloid stories, here's what counts: that voice. No one of her generation sings with more character and conviction. A.S. 4...
Don't Give Up on Sex after 60: Older Women Need the Intimate Physical Connection Even More Than Younger Women. How Passion Can Keep You from Becoming Stuffy and Prim
I had sex last night. I'm 78 and my husband, movie producer David Brown, is 83. Shocking? Shouldn't be. More and more women are continuing to be interested in sex not only in their 40s and 50s, but well into their 60s and 70s. We realize that we don't...
Echoes of a Klan Killing: Four Young Girls Die in a Brutal Church Bombingand Almost 37 Years Later, Justice May Finally Be Near
At 10:19 on Sunday morning, Sept. 15, 1963, a simple time-delay fuse triggered a dozen sticks of dynamite outside the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. The massive explosion tore through the church just before services. When the smoke...
Giving Them the Business: Corporate Lobbyists Go All out to Win a Congressional OK for Legislation to Open the China Markets. Labor Loses a Round?
Ed Whitfield wears the hunted look common among certain congressmen these days. These are the undecided ones, those who haven't said how they'll vote on China. Tracked down in a Capitol Hill hearing room, the Kentucky Republican is surrounded by several...
Helping to Create a New Kind of Family: As a Gay Man, I Assumed I'd Never Have Kids. Now I Have the Chance to Be a Father - and to Change My Life
While a freshman at Columbia University, I came out, which seemed to clinch the fact that I would go through life childless. In my late teens, studying and dancing with my friends at the Roxy filled up most of my time. Discovering New York and my newfound...
How Could It Have Happened? A Devastating Probe of the Blunders That Fanned the New Mexico Flames
The first sign of trouble came a little after 11 p.m. Late in the evening on Thursday, May 4, just a few hours after National Park Service officials lit the ill-fated fire inside New Mexico's Bandelier National Monument, the blaze was already starting...
Message in a Beer Bottle: Molson Cracks Open a Cool Ad for Its Canadian Brand
Whaaassup with Canadians? A commercial for Molson Canadian beer called "The Rant" has become the unofficial anthem north of the border, the biggest thing since Wayne Gretzky's retirement tour last year. The spot has deeply penetrated Canadian consciousness...
'Mr. Welch Is in a Meeting': GE's Legendary Chairman Is Retiring, but His Secret Weapon May Soon Be Available
For more than a decade, General Electric chairman Jack Welch has reigned as a management god. And at his right hand, in a cubicle a few steps away, sits Rosanne Badowski, his executive assistant. Badowski doesn't look imposing. But she's the master...
Next Big Issue:Heir Rights: Banks and Brokers Will Have to Do Better When Handling Inherited Accounts
Q: After my husband died, I called Charles Schwab for the forms I needed to liquidate his $33,600 IRA and roll the proceeds into an IRA at a bank. But the so-called distribution-election form that I received allows only for a rollover to a new Schwab...
Now It's Hillary against a New Kid: It's Not Glamorous, but the New New York Senate Race Is Still Full of Celebrity and High Stakes
News travels fast in new york, but now it was racing at the speed of light. Mayor Rudy Giuliani called Gov. George Pataki at 12:15 p.m. last Friday to give him the word: his prostate cancer would force him out of the U.S. Senate race against Hillary...
Perspectives
"I've decided what I should do is to put my health first... This is not the right time to run for office." New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, ending speculation that he will drop out of the race for U.S. Senate against Hillary Rodham Clinton in New York...
Probing a Slaughter: A U.S. Assault on Iraqi Troops Was 'A Grouse Shoot'but Was It an Excessive Use of Force?
Veterans of operation desert Storm sometimes call the Battle of Rumaylah the Battle of the Junkyard, because when it was over, the battlefield was scattered with the burned-out remains of 600 Iraqi tanks, armored personnel carriers, guns and trucks....
Saving Private Welch
It's the bane of bosses everywhere: the talented worker who leaves the company, snagged by a competitor. In today's tight job market, it's a vexing problem. But Reuben Gutoff could teach you a few things. In 1961 Gutoff managed a General Electric new...
'Shame Has Befallen Me': Foday Sankoh Loses His Freedom and His Dignity
Something, nobody knows what, drew Foday Sankoh back to his wrecked villa. At 5:30 in the morning last Wednesday, a local Muslim cleric, Imam Kabbah Sesay, saw the rebel leader and a bodyguard walking toward him on Dirty Road in suburban Freetown,...
'Shanghai Noon' at the Comic Corral: Offbeat Actor Owen Wilson Lassos His Biggest Laughs Yet
Owen Wilson is an actor, but think of him as a sort of secret agent. He has an offbeat, indie-movie sensibility. Every so often, however, he infiltrates some big-budget movie he clearly doesn't belong in--"Anaconda," "Armageddon," "The Haunting"--and...
Slim Shady Sounds Off: Sensitive or Sick: Will the Real Eminem <I>please</i> Stand Up? A New Album Takes Us on a Wild Trip with the Rap World's Brightest and Bawdiest Talent
"God sent me to piss the world off," proclaimed Eminem on last year's catchy hit single, "My Name Is." And standing on a Manhattan street corner in a superhero suit with an MTV camera crew in tow, taunting a pair of dangerously irate construction workers...
Something Rotten in Palestine: People in the West Bank and Gaza Are Angry at Israel, but Their Fury May Turn to Another Target: Arafat's Government
For 17 days, Mahmoud Hamdouni sat in a dank Palestinian jail on trumped-up charges, brooding over the fortune he had hoped to make once peace came. Hamdouni had bought 30 acres of land in the desert outside the West Bank town of Jericho. He had built...
Surviving Higher Rates: With the Federal Reserve Taking a Bead on Inflation, Investors Have to Dust off Strategies for Coping with Escalating Interest Expenses
Chairman Al has fired again. Determined to contain inflation, the Federal Reserve raised interest rates last week for the sixth time in a year and hinted broadly that it would up the ante again this summer. Fed chairman Alan Greenspan wants to squeeze...
Talkin' 'Bout My Generation
We're pleased that so many members of "the millennial generation" responded to our May 8 cover story, "What Teens Believe." "We are passionate about life and our beliefs. We want to make a difference. Most important, we want to be ourselves," wrote...
That Old Social Security Magic: Bush and Gore's Amazing Plans to Help the Nation's Most Popular Federal Program Are All Gain, No Pain
If last week's sparring over Social Security is an example, Al Gore and George W. Bush shouldn't be competing for the job of chief executive of the United States. Instead, they should be competing for chief magician. Or chief anesthesiologist. Because...
The Risks of Estrogen: After Menopause, Changes in Women's Bodies Can Make Sex Painful. but New Studies Raise Doubts about Hormone Therapy
How much risk will a woman accept in return for good sex? Many women approaching or past menopause view estrogen-replacement therapy (ERT) as a fountain of youth in a pill. By pumping up blood concentrations of estrogen to near-youthful levels, ERT...
The Science of Women & Sex: Inspired by Viagra, Researchers Are Rushing to Unlock the Mysteries of Female Desire. the Answers Are Turning out to Be Much More Complex Than Anyone Expected
For Ellen, a 45-year-old college professor in rural Maryland, the music of the bedroom has never been as harmonious as it is in magazines. She cannot reach orgasm with her husband, and has only tepid interest in sex. "Frankly, it's the one fly in the...
The Shadow over America: How Our Use of the Death Penalty Hurts Our Image Abroad
After New York investment banker Felix Rohatyn became the U.S. ambassador to France nearly three years ago, he was surprised to encounter bitter criticism of the American death penalty in his new post. Newsweek asked Rohatyn to gauge the importance...
This Week, a Royal Flush
He could have been known, simply, as Mr. Nelson. But Prince Rogers Nelson, a.k.a. Prince, a.k.a. The Artist Formerly Known as Prince, is nowready?The Artist Formerly Known as the Artist Formerly Known as Prince. Well, sort of. Last week the 41-year-old,...