Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 26

A Cut above the Rest: Elisa Jimenez's Slash-and-Burn Clothes Catch Fire
Cutting-edge is the best way to describe fashion designer Elisa Jimenez--literally. On Valentine's Day a client, Moran Nadler, was squeezed into Jimenez's three-room apartment-studio to have her wedding dress made. Jimenez cleared away her daughter's...
A Garland for Dorothy: Judy, Judy, Judy-The Warts-and-All Mini-Series
Wearing that fat suit was a bitch. She's not looking forward to the poison-pen letters from the Judy fanatics, either. But at the moment, the actress Judy Davis's biggest Garland-related worry is pharmacological. Just as she sits down to chat about...
A Lethal Eruption: Khalil Abu Ulbah Was an 'Exemplary Employee,' His Israeli Boss Said. but Then the Arab Snapped, Killing Eight Israelis with His Bus. Does Ariel Sharon Face a Nation of Abu Ulbahs?
In the teeming Sheikh Rodwan district of Gaza City, relatives and neighbors sensed that Khalil Abu Ulbah was near the breaking point. For nearly five months, as the Palestinian intifada raged across the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, the 35-year-old...
A Mom for Massachusetts: A Young Governor Faces a Tough Job-And New Twins
When Jane Swift ran for lieutenant governor of Massachusetts in 1998, she faced tough questions that had nothing to do with her record. How's that morning sickness? Would she breast-feed? How would she govern and take care of Elizabeth, the daughter...
An Erotic Encounter: The NEAR Spacecraft's Landing on the Asteroid Eros Promises a Wealth of Astronomical Information
Space probes have touched down on Venus, Mars and the moon--but none has ever attempted to land on a tiny rock hurtling through space. That changed last week, when scientists guided the NEAR Shoemaker craft to a gentle landing atop the potato-shaped...
Attention, Doctors: What We Call Attention-Deficit Disorder Is Actually Six Different Conditions. and One-Drug-Fits-All Therapy Isn't Right for Any of Them
Sam was 12 when he came to my office with a difficult case of attention-deficit disorder. He'd had four years of the kind of care that gives ADD treatment a bad name. After his initial diagnosis at 8, Sam was given Ritalin, a standard stimulant. He...
Backstage at the Finale: RUNNING ON FUMES: Pulling All-Nighters, Bill Clinton Spent His Last Days Obsessing over Details and Pardons. the Inside Story
He'd been up for days. Red-eyed and puffy faced, his voice hoarse with fatigue, Bill Clinton sat in the Oval Office for hours on his last night as president, talking with friends and aides as he sorted through eight years' worth of photographs, books...
Beijing's Olympic Moment: Why the Regime Is Furiously Lobbying to Host the 2008 Games
They aren't kings, presidents or potentates. But when the 18 members of the International Olympic Committee's inspection team arrive in Beijing this week, China will treat them as if they hold the fate of the nation in their hands. From the airport,...
Billionaire Backlash: Guess Who Opposes Bush's Plan to Cut Estate Taxes?
The rich may be different, but they certainly aren't indifferent. Banking heiress and art patron Agnes Gund irritated some of her wealthy friends last week by going public with her opposition to President Bush's plan to repeal the estate tax. Many...
Bush vs. Iraq: The Rematch: The President, in Office Less Than a Month, Strikes His Father's Old Adversary. but a New Era May Require a Fresh Strategy against Saddam
It was supposed to be a down-home summit--two straight-talking ranchers in a neighborly visit across the Tex-Mex border. But when George W. Bush got to Mexico last week on his first foreign trip as president, a ghost popped up at the barbecue: his...
Cries and Whispers: Best-Selling British Nanny Tracy Hogg Has Advice about Bringing Up Baby. Mary Poppins Would Plotz
On a recent national TV news-magazine show, a red-faced infant was squalling. As the cameras rolled, the bleary-eyed mother juggled the crying child and a mobile phone. On the other end of the line, Los Angeles-based nanny-to-the-stars Tracy Hogg listened...
Critical Moment
MOVIES 'Down to Earth' In this bland "Heaven Can Wait" remake, comedian Chris Rock is reincarnated as a rich white guy. The dramatic scenes deserve heckling, but there are at least a few good laughs for each of the following stars. A.D. 2 Stars ...
Cyberscope
MICROSOFT Even Mom Can Get X-perienced The name of Microsoft's brand-new operating system--an upgrade the company describes as the most significant since Win95--is Windows XP, as in "experience." Don't be fooled by the Jimi Hendrix homage (confirmed...
DARE Checks into Rehab: A New Strategy for the Popular Anti-Drug Program
For more than a decade, Salt Lake City schools did as other schools did: they taught kids about drugs the DARE way. There were cops in the classroom, DARE T shirts and bumper stickers and the message "Just say no." But last summer, Salt Lake Mayor...
Emerald in the Rough: Nuala O'Faolain Aims for Romance and Finds Art
Irish author Nuala O'Faolain gets flustered when you ask her age--she'll admit to "late 50s." She worries about growing old alone. "Until I got Molly," her sheepdog, "I had no idea how to grow old. She's a genuine alternative to the loving-spouse route."...
Focus on Health
EXERCISE Workouts on the Web You know about PDAs; now there's the PFA--the "personal fitness assistant." Available online, by phone or at retail outlets from SportBrain, this $99 "smart" odometer clips to your belt and records every activity that involves...
GM's War on Drug Costs: With Prescription Drugs for Its Employees and Retirees Costing More Than $1 Billion a Year, the Nation's Biggest Automaker Is Taking the Fight to Crank Down on Spending Directly to the Pharmaceutical Giants
The purple pill has General Motors seeing red. The automaker spent $52 million last year buying Prilosec, the brightly colored ulcer medicine, for its employees and retirees. That is millions more than GM executives believe they should have spent,...
Good to the Last Drop: With Napster Losing Another Court Battle, 62 Million Users Are Scrambling to Download All the Tunes They Can before the Site Goes Dark. Will the Upstart Manage to Cut Deals to Stay Alive?
If Eric Clapton wrote a song about Napster, it would sound a lot like "Bell Bottom Blues." "I don't want to fade away," the British rocker sings, "give me one more day." The free online-music service is still alive--but it keeps sustaining serious...
Hi, Mom, I'm in Nepal: For College Students, Banana U Is a Hot Spot
When Nicole Hess decided to spend her junior year abroad, she wanted to go somewhere more exciting than London or Paris, the traditional student meccas. She found it. Shortly before she arrived in Beijing in 1999, NATO forces bombed China's embassy...
His Brother's Keeper: EXCLUSIVE: New Questions about the Departing President's Decision to Clear Roger Clinton's Name
On that last frenzied Friday of Bill Clinton's presidency, as he prepared a list of nearly 140 pardons, one name stood out. And it wasn't Marc Rich, who was not added by Clinton until early the next day. He first wanted to take care of his half brother,...
Isn't Bill Clinton the Former President?
ISN'T BILL CLINTON THE FORMER PRESIDENT? It's deja vu all over again for our political team in Washington. By now, weeks after George W. Bush was inaugurated, most of our correspondents in the capital bureau had expected to be focused on Bush, the...
Is Our Society Making You Sick? America's Health Lags Behind That of More Egalitarian Nations. Economic Equality Is the Medicine We Need
Americans are obsessed with health. Just look at today's magazines, TV shows, Web sites, self-help books--and where we put our dollars. As a country, we make up about 4 percent of the world's total population, yet we expend almost half of all the money...
Kinder, Gentler Clinics: Fed Up with the Care of Your HMO? Try Your Local Hospital for Massage, Acupuncture and Aromatherapy
You're making an appointment at the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at New York's Beth Israel Medical Center, and the receptionist asks if you have a qi stagnation. Hmmm, you hadn't thought of that. But you decide on an M.D., instead of an...
Let's Get Real about Iraq: Bush Should Drop All but Military Sanctions-And Treat Saddam as the Second-Rate Thug He Truly Is
America's policy toward Iraq is a mess. Everyone in Washington seems to realize this, and yet few have the courage to change it. During the presidential campaign the Bush team criticized President Clinton's approach to the problem as bankrupt. But...
Newsmakers
Toss Him a Bone His father's a dog, his mother's a bitch, but little J.R. is baying at the moon. The tiny bichon frise--officially named Special Times Just Right--became the first of his breed to take best in show at the prestigious Westminster Kennel...
Periscope
EXCLUSIVE Now, Painter to the President Simmie Knox has painted athletes, entertainers and judges. Now the Washington, D.C. -area artist has been chosen for the top job: a presidential portrait. Knox, 65, had been trying to interest Bill Clinton...
Perspectives
"Jesus, what the hell was that?" Cmdr. Scott Waddle of the USS Greeneville, as his submarine rammed a Japanese ship, according to one of the sub's passengers" "After what I saw on the ground--body parts, heads split open, guts spilled--I am afraid...
Playing Fair with Copyright: After Napster, the Entertainment Giants Might Use Technology to Stop Even Legal Copying
The appellate judges have spoken: the indiscriminate music-sharing bacchanalia must end. But can 62 million Napster users really be wrong? Almost by definition, such a massive consumer force is a market that must be served. That's why, at the same...
Searching the Depths: Questions Are Growing. So Is the Outrage
Heads bowed, they lined up before the cameras, putting faces on a trans-Pacific tragedy. One grief-stricken man, whose 17-year-old son, Yusuke Terata, was among the nine missing aboard the sunken training vessel Ehime Maru, told a news conference at...
Showdown in the DNA Corral: Rival Teams of Gene Sleuths Are Still Bitter
The completion of the human genome sequence, announced last week, promises to usher in a new age of biology. In these FAQs, we discuss how the genome promises drugs targeted to individual DNA; early warnings of diseases our genes put us at risk for;...
The Internet Predicament: It's a Great Giveaway, but It Won't Drive the Economy Unless It Becomes a Great Business
The Napster adventure captures the Internet's confusing present and uncertain future. By many accounts, Napster is the fastest-growing new Internet application ever. There are 62 million registered users for something that started in April 1999. They...
The Longest Goodbye: STILL HERE: Under Fire since His White House Exit, Clinton Retreats to Harlem and Plots Yet Another Comeback. but the Marc Rich Pardon Has Pushed the Public to Its Limit. What's Next
For Bill Clinton, this was a perfect day: adoring throngs, Creole food, the hope of political revival. His post-presidential life had been a disaster so far, a hailstorm of allegations about last-minute gifts taken and pardons issued--especially to...
The New Invasion: Help! Beatlemania Infects Our Kids
While critics are busy deconstructing exactly what it means to have Eminem and Elton perform a duet at this year's Grammys, they are also secretly thanking some higher power for the distraction. It does, after all, keep them from focusing on the scant...
The Pick of the Glitter: It's All Awards All the Time as the Oscars and Grammys Bear Down on a Helpless Nation. an Opinionated Guide to the Glamour, the Glory-And the Likely Winners
Oscar Nominees The ceremony will be on March 25 BEST PICTURE 'Chocolat' 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon' 'Erin Brockovich' 'Gladiator' 'Traffic' BEST ACTRESS Joan Allen, 'The Contender' Juliette Binoche, 'Chocolat' Ellen...
This Bulb's for You: The Humble Garlic Is the Latest 'Heirloom' Veggie. You Can Get Dozens of Old Varieties from Sweet to Red Hot
Although he grows 87 varieties of garlic on his tiny farm in Sonoma County, Calif., Chester Aaron would readily concede that nobody needs that many different kinds to eat. He himself can identify no more than eight or 10 garlics by taste, and when...
Watching the World Go By: Too Busy to Have a Life of Your Own? There's Always the Vicarious Voyeurism of Reality TV
Never watched "Survivor." never will. what's the point? I've eaten bugs inadvertently myself, dozing in the hammock by the pond on a muggy summer evening. And anyone who wants to watch two petty rival factions go at one another can just wander between...
Why We Can't Let Elvis Go: The Classic Clinton Cycle of Recklessness and Redemption Is Still the Best Theater Around
At first I was puzzled by why the latest installment of the Bill Clinton Story has been so big. Yes, the Marc Rich pardon was inexcusable by any standard, and the Bush honeymoon a tepid media affair by comparison. But week after week of it? The man's...