Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 19

1940-2005: Richard Pryor
Byline: Marc Peyser and Allison Samuels Richard Pryor didn't tell jokes. He became them. Sometimes, the effect was pure hilarity, like the time he jumped off the stage in the middle of his Vegas act, took off his clothes, walked into the casino...
2005's Kind of Progress; near Las Vegas, a Union Hired Temp Workers at $6 an Hour to Picket a Nonunion Wal-Mart, Where Wages Start at $6.75 an Hour
Byline: George F. Will Seeking the serenity that a sense of history confers in testing times, Mike Cameron, a Mets outfielder in 2005, said in defense of a teammate who lost a fly ball in the sun, "Stuff is going to happen sometimes. The sun has...
An Imperial Presidency; Bush's Travel Schedule Seems to Involve as Little Contact as Possible with the Country He Is In
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) President Bush's most recent foreign trips, to Latin America and Asia, went off as expected. He was accompanied by 2,000 people, several airplanes, two helicopters and a tightly...
'Anxious to Get Home'; A Florida Man's Outburst at a Miami Airport Cost Him His Life-And Thrust a Sleepy Law-Enforcement Agency to Center Stage
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores and Mark Hosenball (With Catharine Skipp and Prakash Gandhi) When Rigoberto Alpizar visited his family in Rio Claro, Costa Rica, in July, he grew alarmed at his father's deteriorating heart condition. He took his father...
Breaching the Barrier; Jewish Settlements Are Conceived to Be Just That-Jewish. but Frustrated Palestinians Have Another Idea
Byline: Dan Ephron (With Joanna Chen in Pisgat Zeev) Palestinian residents of Jerusalem have many of the same rights as Israelis. They pay taxes in Israel and get their services from the Jewish state. So when Israel started building a giant barrier...
Bush in the Bubble; He Has a Tight Circle of Trust, and He Likes It That Way. but Members of Both Parties Are Urging Bush to Reach beyond the White House Walls. How He Governs-And How His M.O. Stacks Up Historically
Byline: Evan Thomas and Richard Wolffe (With Holly Bailey, Daniel Klaidman, Eleanor Clift, Michael Hirsh and John Barry) Jack Murtha still can't figure out why the father and son treated him so differently. Every week or so before the '91 gulf war,...
Fantasy Vacations: Kids Save Narnia, an Ape Tours New York; 'KING KONG' 12/14, 'NARNIA' 12/9
Byline: David Ansen I gave my heart to Peter Jackson's gargantuan "King Kong" at the moment when the grizzled giant gorilla gave his heart to Naomi Watts's Ann Darrow. As the scene opens, they're on a high ledge over Skull Island, where the terrified...
Hollywood: DreamWorks Sale-Why the Dream Didn't Work
Byline: Sean Smith The dream is over. Eleven years after founding their studio, Steven Spielberg, David Geffen and Jeffrey Katzenberg agreed to sell DreamWorks SKG to Viacom for a reported $1.6 billion. Viacom's studio division, Paramount Pictures,...
Hotwiring Your Search Engine; Google a Topic, and the Results Are Based on Popularity, Right? Wrong. Inside the Shadowy World of 'SEOs.'
Byline: Brad Stone Three years ago, the web site of Oppedisano's Bootery, an 81-year-old shoe store in the amiable upstate village of Honeoye Falls, N.Y., was receiving a scant 100 visitors a week. Then the owners hired a Seattle consultant named...
Into the Wild: A Scientific Approach
Byline: Claudia Kalb and Vanessa Juarez It's not as easy as popping Prozac, but it's definitely more fun: swimming with dolphins. But is it medicine? In a recent study published in the British Medical Journal, researchers found that patients with...
Investing Goes Back to Basics; You've Discovered the Joys of Buying Simpler Things. A Hugely Popular Investment Has Been 'All-in-One' Funds with a Good Mix of Stocks and Bonds
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Call it the year of living cautiously. Investors, burned for too long, decided that picking stocks wasn't their cup of tea. They're not so sure about high-priced mutual-fund managers,...
Judi, Judi, Judi! the Divine Ms. D Delivers. 'Mrs. Henderson Presents' 12/9
A 69-year-old widowed English aristocrat with a tongue as tart as an adder's and a contempt for the stuffy propriety of '30s London that's facilitated by her sense of noblesse oblige, Laura Henderson (Judi Dench) is based on a real woman. Moviegoers,...
Keeping Up with the Gateses; on a Whirlwind Tour through South Asia, 'The Benefactors' Show That When It Comes to Health, They Mean Business
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Next time you visit Dhaka, Bangladesh, consider having Bill and Melinda Gates along. When the couple arrived in the city last week, its traffic-choked streets became 60mph thoroughfares lined by curious masses and secured...
Let's Make out in 2006!
Byline: Joan Raymond Come Dec. 31, Americans will resolve to lose 20 pounds, quit smoking and save the environment--only to slip back into old habits before the snow melts. To forestall resolution failure, tip sheet asked experts in various fields...
Mail Call
Preventing Bird Flu Our Oct. 31 cover story on the threat of avian flu won praise from many readers. "A well-written and informative report," lauded one. Claimed another, "No vaccine can be created--there are too many variants of the flu for a single...
Mail Call: Understanding the Origins of Anorexia
Our Dec. 5 cover story shed some light on the battle against anorexia, readers said. The mother of a sufferer diagnosed as a preteen wrote, "Anorexia is not only a despicable and deadly disease but an oft-misunderstood one." Another said, "Your magazine...
Music: An 'Idol' at the Movies
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Will Young is making his big-screen debut. That, of course, means zilch to most of us. But Young is the Kelly Clarkson of British pop music. As the winner of the first "Pop Idol" in 2002 (the U.K.'s version of "American Idol"),...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: Reuters, New York Daily News, CNN, W Magazine, CNN, AFP, Vogue, WXYZ-TV, Associated Press "The idea that we're going to win... is just plain wrong." DNC Chairman Howard Dean, deeming the war in Iraq unwinnable, a statement...
Playstation 2: 'Hero' Worship
Byline: Brad Stone Walk into a Japanese arcade these days and you'll see kids shaking maracas, banging the drums or madly dancing, trying to match the rhythm and tempo of their games' electronic soundtracks. But aside from the modest success of...
Seven Things* I'd Rather Talk About. Than Nannies And/or Jude Law
Byline: Sienna Miller (Nicki Gostin) 1 Corsets. It's like Vivien Leigh in "Gone With the Wind"--you have to hold onto a pole to get strapped in. I lost a few intestinal organs making "Casanova," but the upside was the cleavage, which I've never...
Sit Down for This: A Tax Deal I Admire
Byline: Allan Sloan To most spectators, General Electric's sale of $1.4 billion worth of Genworth Financial stock last week seemed like a typical ho-hum transaction. GE was selling stock in its former insurance subsidiary for the third time since...
Snap Judgment: Movies
Byline: David Ansen The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada Directed by Tommy Lee Jones As an actor Tommy Lee Jones rarely makes a false move. A master of understatement, he conveys a sense of enormous power held in check. The same could be...
Stop the Insanity! Try a Homemade Christmas. I Used to Refuse to Even Put Up a Tree. Now That We've Got a New Tradition, I've Got a New Attitude
Byline: Sarah Stratton (Stratton lives in Berthoud, Colo.) It's Christmastime (yes, time--no American consumer would be naive enough to think that Christmas is a one-day event) once again. The difference this year is that for the first time in a...
Sunnis Change Course; Even Some Insurgents and Their Sympathizers Are Reassessing Their Strategy, and Plan to Vote in This Week's Elections for a New Government
Byline: Joshua Hammer and Scott Johnson Ahmed Duraid is ready for a new era. Like almost all of his neighbors in Adhamiya, a stronghold of the Sunni insurgency along the Tigris River in central Baghdad, the 35-year-old clothes vendor boycotted Iraq's...
Tempest: Part Two; Tulane Students Fight to Stay Right Where They Are
Byline: Jessica Silver-Greenberg Standing on the edge of Harvard Yard last week, Adam Nikolich looked like a typical Ivy League freshman--except for the sign he was holding. TULANE, NOT TOO LATE, it declared in pink neon. Nearby, about 20 supporters...
The Bloom Is off the Book; 'Memoirs of A Geisha' 12/9
Byline: David Ansen The story of a young girl, sold by her family into slavery, who rises to become the reigning geisha of her day, bears more than a small resemblance to "Cinderella," though it happens to be set in Kyoto in the 1930s and '40s....
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker While working on this week's cover story, White House correspondent Richard Wolffe found himself flashing back to the New Hampshire primary in 2000. It was there that he first met George W. Bush's closest advisers, as he threw...
The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter; 'BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN' 12/9
Byline: David Ansen Annie Proulx's 1997 short story "Brokeback Mountain" is one of the great modern love stories: its chiseled-from-rock prose lodges in your memory forever. It's the story of two itinerant cowboys--Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhaal),...
The Lessons Tulia Teaches; If There Is Any Enduring Lesson in This Mess, It Is about How Easily Good People Are Led Astray, and How Carelessly Injustice Is Rationalized
Byline: Ellis Cose Tulia will forever be known as that tiny town in Texas where dozens of innocent black folks were imprisoned on the word of a lying white narc--which is not to say Tulians are comfortable with that fact. "We moved past that. I...
Two Cultures Clash, and Two Lovers Leap; 'The New World' 12/25
Byline: David Ansen Our mental picture of the English settlers' landing in America tends to look as stiff as a grammar-school pageant: Englishmen right, with muskets; Indians left, bearing corn. Terrence Malick's "The New World" wipes clean our...
We Cooked the Books; Each Year We See More New Cookbooks Than You Can Shake a Whisk at. How to Choose? Well, You Could Do What We Did-Take 'Em Home, Buy the Ingredients, Road-Test the Recipes at Our Table. but Trust Us: These Are the Best
Byline: Dorothy Kalins Do you know why I hate chef's cookbooks? Because they're usually conceived by some besotted book editor at the wine-soaked end of a long restaurant dinner, with the bravado of "Honey, I can make you a star." Said chef signs...
Who Cares about Turin? with Italy's $15 Billion 'Stealth' Olympics Less Than Two Months Away, Awareness Is Low, and So Are Ticket Sales
Byline: Mark Starr (With Barbie Nadeau in Turin) Olympics are replete with drama, often before opening ceremonies even take place. In 2002, the world anxiously awaited the Salt Lake City Games, nervous about an American Olympics only a few months...
With Enemies like This; Hugo Chavez Has a New Weapon in His Battle against the Bush Administration: Low-Priced Oil for U.S. Cities
Byline: Joseph Contreras and John Barry (With Phil Gunson in Caracas) Applause and cheers welcomed the Citgo truck as it pulled up at a South Bronx curbside one icy morning last week. The 9,500-gallon tanker was on a mission for one of the Bush...
Your Mother Hates Me! but It's OK Because I Hate Your Mother. 'The Family Stone' 12/16
Byline: David Ansen The Stone Family is one of those big, lovably eccentric American movie clans that date back as far as Frank Capra's "You Can't Take It With You." Matriarch Sybil (Diane Keaton), professor dad Kelly (Craig T. Nelson) and their...