Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 1

A Dangerous Dance; Lebanon's P.M. Rips Israel and Criticizes Syria. He Wants President Lahoud to Quit, but That Could Be a Death Sentence
Byline: Lally Weymouth Lebanon's new prime minister, Fuad Siniora, visited President Bush last week to appeal for support. Lebanon is struggling to emerge as a democratic country--free from Syria's grip. Yet Damascus still wields vast influence...
A Starbucks Jolt to the Big Screen
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts "Akeelah and the Bee," opening on 2,800 screens this Friday, is an inspiring little film. It's about a precocious 11-year-old girl, Akeelah, who copes with her father's murder by becoming a spelling whiz. Played by relative...
Bush Pops His Bubble; ON THE MOVE: The White House Spring Cleaning Continues. but Will It Matter?
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Holly Bailey No matter how powerful he grew inside the Bush White House, Josh Bolten always came off as just one of the guys, a smart, hardworking wonk who ducked publicity and rewarded his staff with a night at the bowling...
Flight of the Intruders; Re-Creating the Terrifying Ordeal of United 93
Byline: David Ansen A feeling of dread permeates "United 93." It starts even before you enter the theater--unless for some reason you are unaware that you're about to see a movie about the one hijacked plane on September 11, 2001, that didn't reach...
Hu's Visit: Bush's Chinese Diplomacy-Lost in Translation
Byline: Melinda Liu in Beijing and Richard Wolffe with the president President Hu Jintao can take comfort in one thing: most Chinese didn't see the excruciating reception he got at the White House. Not right away, that is. The state-controlled news...
Iran: The Intelligence Reports vs. the Hard-Liners
Byline: Mark Hosenball Some neocon activists have urged a sharp increase in U.S. efforts to undermine Tehran and thwart its nuclear ambitions. American Enterprise Institute scholar Michael Ledeen told NEWSWEEK: "The people hate [the regime]. It's...
It's Policies, Not People; Shuffling Top Advisers Can't Compensate for an Agenda That Seems Driven More by Partisan Preferences Than by Important National Needs
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The second-term white house shake-up is an old tradition, driven variously by scandal, exhaustion and ambition. Presidents need to be protected and reinvigorated. Scapegoats for past failures need to be dumped. The Bush...
Newsmakers: Eva Longoria
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Marc Peyser That desperate housewife Eva Longoria is trading in her yoga mat for a gun in "The Sentinel." As her hair was being done, she chatted with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. I heard you're a really good shot. Eva Longoria:...
Pearl Jam Comes Alive; the Reluctant Rockers Return with a New CD That Might Just Bring Back the Fame They Love to Hate
Byline: Lorraine Ali Eddie Vedder writes songs on a manual typewriter, carries important papers in a 1940s suitcase, keeps his credit cards in a plastic Batman wallet and wears his beat-up lumberjack boots over a pair of blue argyle socks. He prefers...
Perspectives
"I'm the decider, and I decide what's best."George W. Bush, on his role as president, in response to calls for Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's resignation "Destroy private American aircraft ... We call upon all Muslims to follow and identify...
See You in Bible Class; Georgia Plans to Teach the Good Book in Schools
Byline: Sarah Childress Fresh from a bruising federal court fight over the teaching of evolution, Georgia marched back into the culture wars last week when Gov. Sonny Perdue signed a bill allowing Bible classes in public high schools. An estimated...
Stuck in the Hot Zone; Don't Dream about Full Exits. the Military Is in Iraq for the Long Haul
Byline: Michael Hirsh (With John Barry and Mark Hosenball in Washington, Michael Hastings in New York and Scott Johnson in Baghdad) Maj. Micah Morgan fondly pats the nose of his Predator drone, much as a cavalry officer of old might have stroked...
Summer Gift Guide
How will you spend your summer vacation? Whether it's at the beach or Buenos Aires, camping out or in a luxury hotel), there's one cardinal rule: pack wisely. To help you on your many adventures, Tip Sheet tested the very best summer gear. From water...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker It's been 11 years since senior writer Susannah Meadows graduated from Duke. A month ago, she returned to her alma mater to report the tawdry but riveting story of a lacrosse-team party gone bad, with a stripper charging rape...
The Long and Grinding Road; the Rat Race Is Turning into a Marathon. Inside the Lives of 'Extreme Commuters.'
Byline: Keith Naughton (With Hilary Shenfeld, Raina Kelley, Nadine Joseph and Jennifer Ordonez) At 5:40 a.m., the alarm blares news-talk radio and Bill Small rolls out of bed. With a two-hour commute ahead of him, the Chicago doctor wastes little...
The Sign of the Times; the First Adolescent Superpower Is Meeting the Immovable Force of the World's Most Populous Nation, with the Fastest-Growing Economy
Byline: Anna Quindlen It is disconcerting, even a little frightening, to be in a place in which it is impossible to read the signs. As citizens of the world's most dominant culture, Americans often manage to avoid the feeling. They are now able...
'Vintage' Bugs Return; Mumps? Whooping Cough? Rickets? What Year Is It?
***** CORRECTION: In " 'Vintage' Bugs Return" (May 1) we incorrectly reported that an adolescent booster vaccine for pertussis was introduced in October 2005. It was introduced in June of that year. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline:...
We've Overlooked One of Our Greatest Assets; I Believe That Our Community and Junior Colleges Can Help America Regain Its Competitive Edge
Byline: William D. Green; Green is CEO of Accenture. If you had told me back in 1971--the year I graduated high school--that I'd be going off to college soon, I would have assured you that you were sorely mistaken. I was the son of a plumber living...
What FDR Teaches Us; Long Shadow: A New Book Relives His First 100 Days. Have a Look, Mr. President
Byline: Jonathan Alter; <I>Adapted from</I> The Defining Moment: FDR's Hundred Days And The Triumph Of Hope <I>by Jonathan Alter, to be published by Simon & Schuster on May 2.</I> On one level, it's unfair to compare...
What Happened at Duke? Sex. Race. A Raucous Party. A Rape Charge. and a Prosecutor Up for Re-Election. Inside the Mystery That Has Roiled a Campus and Riveted the Country
***** CORRECTION: Editor's Note: In our cover story on the Duke lacrosse team, a description of lacrosse players closely tracked language in a story on the lacrosse culture that appeared in Slate, the online magazine. The language was inadvertently...
Why Don't We Do It on the Internet?
Byline: Steven Levy Go to itunes or Rhapsody and search for "Beatles" and where do you wind up? Nowhere, man. The greatest rock group ever doesn't sell its songs online. That's why the managing director of the Beatles' record label, Neil Aspinall,...