Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 11

Ask the Pro
Byline: Linda Stern Susan C. Keating, CEO of the National Foundation For Credit Counseling, spoke to Linda Stern about the current credit crunch. How much debt trouble are we in? Seniors, many of whom are on fixed incomes, are carrying an...
Beliefwatch: Separated?
Byline: Steven Waldman When U.S. Rep. Katherine Harris recently told a religious journal that separation of church and state was "a lie," many critics cited this as another sign she was out of the mainstream. But, experts say, she was reflecting...
Credit: Playing Your Cards Right
Byline: Linda Stern Bad news for anyone who likes a freebie. Credit-card companies are cutting back on their rewards. In the last month, Citibank and American Express have ended the 5 percent and double-cash-back rebates offered for cardholders...
Healing War's Wounds; the Pentagon Is Testing a New Approach to Mending the Growing Number of Severely Injured Soldiers: Extreme Sports. A Ride on the Rugged Road to Recovery
Byline: Karen Breslau Hey, have any of y'all seen the crocodile that got my arm?" U.S. Army Maj. Anthony Smith hoists his prosthetic hook, tied to a paddle, as he floats down Idaho's Salmon River in a large blue raft, manned by a cackling crew of...
Hizbullah's Worrisome Weapon; Imagine If Terrorists Got Hold of Car Bombs with Wings. Now They Can
Byline: Dan Ephron (With Kevin Peraino in Jerusalem) Hizbullah's chief, Hassan Nasrallah, spent the past two years bragging about a remote-control aircraft that could carry an explosive device to strike a target anywhere inside Israel. He finally...
Interview: What Would Big Bird Do?
Byline: Julie Scelfo "Sesame Street" began in 1969 with a revolutionary idea: learning could be fun. The cast of furry Muppets and their inimitable songs became so popular among kids of all backgrounds--and not just the disadvantaged kids the show...
It's Sweet Home Chicago for a Silicon Valley Vet; under CEO Ed Zander, Motorola Is Gaining on Phone Giant Nokia. Can the New Motofone Help Close the Gap?
Byline: Brad Stone After two and a half years as CEO of Chicago electronics maker Motorola, Silicon Valley vet Ed Zander is no longer a fish out of water. He's piloted Motorola to 10 straight profitable quarters, increasing the company's share of...
MIDEAST RELATIONS: After His Son's Death, A New Life's Work
Byline: Matthew Philips Judea pearl, father of slain Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, and former Pakistani diplomat Akbar Ahmed are among the winners of the inaugural Purpose Prize, an award created by think tank Civic Ventures to honor...
My Declaration of ... Well, Dependence; as Much as I Value Being Self-Sufficient, I Found That Assisted Living Comes with Advantages
Byline: Angelo Devitis (Devitis lives in southern Florida.) I live in an old-age home. It's not called an old-age home, of course. It has a fancy descriptive title that includes the words "classic" and "luxury." Homes such as mine like to use synonyms...
Newsmakers: Lionel Richie, Katie Couric, Ivanka Trump
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Jac Chebatoris, Ramin Setoodeh Lionel Richie He's a chart topper again with his new CD, "Coming Home"--and not just because he's Nicole Richie's father. He spoke with Nicki Gostin. Who do you think has been responsible...
Perspectives
"The Iranian nation will not accept ... any bullying." Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, on a U.N. demand that his government halt production of nuclear fuel "Once again, we face similar challenges in efforts to confront the rising threat...
Q & A 'We Understand We're in Trouble'; Bill Ford Jr., CEO, Ford
Byline: Keith Naughton Talk about your Motown meltdown. The full-throttle crisis afflicting General Motors has suddenly moved across town to Ford Motor Co. It's not that GM is fixed, it's just that Ford is more of a wreck at the moment. It lost...
Retirement: Cracking Open the Nest Egg
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) When you think about retiring, you run your mind over your "pile"-- the savings and investments that you're building up. But the size of your pile represents only potential security,...
Rosie's New View; after a Four-Year Hiatus, O'Donnell Returns as Part of TV's Most Beloved Coffee Klatch. an Exclusive Talk about Her Career, Her Critics and the Star Jones Mess
Byline: Marc Peyser You might think that Tom Cruise doesn't have a single fan left, but you would be wrong. We found one. Her name is Rosie O'Donnell. Rosie may not be the last person who still loves Cruise--Katie Holmes? his mother?--but she's...
Ten Ways to Prepare Your Child for School
Byline: Dominic Gullo, Queens College, N.Y. For Kindergarten 1Read To Them Pull out the board books, get cozy and channel Mr. Rogers. Kids love repetition and there's no such thing as reading too much to your child. 2Talk To Them Sing...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker The mother of two sons nearing their teen years, Peg Tyre, who suggested and wrote this week's cover story, remembers when first grade wasn't quite such a pressure cooker. But Lisa Miller, who edited the story, already shudders...
The 'Islamofascists'; Bush's New National-Security Offensive Has Been Plagued by Debate over What to Call the Bad Guys
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Holly Bailey Last fall White House aides were grappling with a seemingly simple question that had eluded them for years: what should the president, in his many speeches on the war on terror, call the enemy? They were searching...
The Last Word: Japan's Move to Normality; Many Japanese Want Their Nation to Rise from the Post-1945 Apologetic Crouch That Has Made Even Patriotism Problematic
Byline: George F. Will A dragonfly flitted in front of me and stopped on a fence. I stood up, took my cap in my hands, and was about to catch the dragonfly when ... --From "Children of the Atomic Bomb: Testament of Boys and Girls of Hiroshima"...
The New First Grade: Too Much Too Soon; Kids as Young as 6 Are Tested, and Tested Again, to Ensure They're Making Sufficient Progress. Then There's Homework, More Workbooks and Tutoring
Byline: PEG TYRE (with Matthew Philips, Julie Scelfo, Catharine Skipp, Nadine Joseph, Paul Tolme and Hilary Shenfeld) Brian And Tiffany Aske of Oakland, Calif., desperately want their daughter, Ashlyn, to succeed in first grade. That's why they're...
The New Naysayers; in the Midst of Religious Revival, Three Scholars Argue That Atheism Is Smarter
Byline: Jerry Adler Americans answered the atrocities of September 11, overwhelmingly, with faith. Attacked in the name of God, they turned to God for comfort; in the week after the attacks, nearly 70 percent said they were praying more than usual....
The Polygamist's Life; Escaping Warren Jeffs's Controversial Religious Sect
Byline: Andrew Murr Polygamous leader warren Jeffs banished Sam Icke for kissing a girl. Icke, then 17, had been doing his best to follow the rules of Jeffs's insular Mormon sect--listening to the leader's taped sermons, avoiding even G-rated movies...
The Year of Living Fearfully; He Has Gone from Being an Obscure and Not-So-Powerful Politician to a Central Player in the Mideast, Simply by Goading the United States
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) It's 1938, says the liberal columnist Richard Cohen, evoking images of Hitler's armies massing in the face of an appeasing West. No, no, says Newt Gingrich, the Third World...
This Week Online; Online Excerpt
Elizabeth Warren NEWSWEEK: A year after Congress passed the new bankruptcy law, many bankruptcies now being filed result from medical debt. So the stereotype of debtors with big-screen TVs is false? Harvard law professor: It's right up there...
Tomlinson: Horsing around at the Office?
Byline: Mark Hosenball Congressional Democrats are weighing their next move in the wake of a State Department inspector-general report alleging that the politically connected chief of the board that oversees the government's foreign broadcast services...
Walking the World Stage; What Makes Barack Obama, a Man with a Meager Public Record, Light the Fires of Hope from Here to the Far Corners of Africa?
Byline: Ellis Cose It is not too early to pronounce Barack Obama a political phenomenon unlike any previously seen on the American scene. He proved that last week in Kenya, where he was received in a manner more befitting a messiah than a junior...
Will You Let Them Store Your Dreams? Even If the Search Companies Are Careful to Protect the Information, There's Reason for You to Worry
Byline: Steven Levy What could be more revealing than a list of one's search queries? The efficiency of finding what we need on the Web encourages us to quest away--whether we're researching a car purchase, puzzling out some medical symptoms, wondering...