Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 154, No. 16, October 19

An Inconvenient Truth Teller
Byline: Holly Bailey and Evan Thomas; With Daniel Klaidman, Michael Hirsh, Mark Hosenball, and Jeffrey Bartholet in Washington From health-care reform to Afghanistan, Joe Biden has bucked Obama--as only a good Veep can. Joe Biden had a question....
Building a Better Password
Byline: Nick Summers Tough to remember but easy to crack, passwords are the weak link in computer security. Billions hang in the balance. My password is gr8199. I've been using it for more than a decade, ever since a Web site first required me...
Can the War in Afghanistan Still Be Won?
Byline: Intelligence Squared U.S., Steven Clemons,Patrick Lang, Ralph Peters, Steve Coll, John Nagl, James Shinn Opposing arguments in a debate as old as the conflict itself. Only those who were in the room know what was said in the series of...
Chaosistan
Byline: Mark Hosenball In his widely reported London speech earlier this month, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, the U.S. commander in Afghanistan, described how people constantly offer him ideas for fixing that country's problems. One of the more unusual...
Corner-Office Converts
Byline: Daniel Gross Meet the progressive CEOs. Andrew Taylor, the CEO of Enterprise Rent-A-Car, in many ways epitomizes the business establishment. His family is No. 32 on the Forbes 400, their $7 billion fortune built on allowing middle-class...
Cruelty in the Court
Byline: George F. Will Crush videos and foie gras. No matter how fast and far you lower your opinion of the human race, there is no keeping up with the reasons for doing so. Or so the Supreme Court justices must have thought last week as they...
'Don't Panic'
Byline: Richard M. Smith and Richard Baird A management guru on keeping talent in a downturn. Few phrases in corporate life inspire fear like the four words "We've hired some consultants." Indeed, as companies cut costs to match plummeting revenue,...
It's Time for Italy to Ditch Silvio
Byline: Christopher Dickey Italy's prime minister is a magnet for scandal. There was the allegation by Silvio Berlusconi's estranged wife that he flirted with underage girls, the call girl who said he offered her a European Parliament seat in exchange...
Let Generals Speak Their Minds
Byline: Jon Meacham Coming from Robert Gates--the epitome of the soft-spoken, buttoned-down public servant--the rebuke was particularly striking. Military officers, Gates said last week, should give their advice to America's civilian leadership...
Marriage Is Hard
Byline: Lisa Miller The Religious Right admits it. Billy Graham had a rule. He was a powerful man, away from his wife and children more often than he was with them. Aware of the significance of his reputation and convinced of the moral value...
Now You See It
Byline: Isia Jasiewicz Despite what you might think from its name, the Museum of Afghan Civilization will be the very model of a modern major museum when it opens in January. It will be housed in an angular, postmodern building, designed by France's...
Paradise Lost
Byline: Ana Menendez; Menendez's latest novel is The Last War. I have photos of Cuba's Varadero beach from when my father was growing up there in the 1940s and '50s. They are remarkable mostly for what's missing: high-rise hotels and their tangle...
President of Planet Earth
Byline: Howard Fineman Why Obama's Nobel was inevitable. In the rose garden last Friday, Barack Obama, with a deep sense of humility and in the name of all mankind, reluctantly accepted the Nobel Peace Prize committee's decision proclaiming him...
The Case against a Surge
Byline: Fareed Zakaria More troops won't solve Afghanistan. At the heart of Gen. Stanley McChrystal's request for a major surge in troops is the assumption that we are failing in Afghanistan. But are we really? The United States has had one central...
There's No Place like Home
Fewer Americans are relocating than at any time since 1962. That's good news for families, communities--and even the environment. On almost any night of the week, Churchill's Restaurant is hopping. The 10-year-old hot spot in Rockville Centre, Long...
The World's Most Reviled Genius
Byline: Jeneen Interlandi Can the scientist who denied the cause of AIDS be trusted to cure cancer? Peter Duesberg has grown accustomed to all of the slights that come with a life in intellectual exile. The 72-year-old molecular biologist no...
Underqualified for the Overrated
Byline: Christopher Hitchens; Hitchens Is A Newsweek contributor and columnist for Vanity Fair. ***** Correction:(published Oct. 14, 2009): The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded in Oslo, not Stockholm, as originally reported. ***** Alfred Nobel...
We Are All Getting Lucky
Byline: Julia Baird But we are not all the boss. Dear [POOKY]: I know that this may seem silly or unnecessary to you, but I really want you to give serious consideration to the matter as it is very important to me. [like you are, my strumpet]....
'Where the Wild Things Are'
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh And Andrew Romano Let the Wild Rumpus Start! For more than 40 years, kids have wondered about Where the Wild Things Are. Are they real or imaginary? Friends or foes? Now that we're grown-ups, we still can't help you, but...