Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 15, April 12

Absinthe Makes the Heart Grow Fonder
Byline: Julia Reed For the past three years it has been legal, once again, to sell absinthe in America. So far I have seen no noteworthy spike in violent crime, creativity, or especially wanton debauchery, all of which were purported results of...
Alan Simpson: 'No One Forgives Anyone'
Byline: Weston Kosova The co-chair of Obama's deficit commission on today's Washington. Alan Simpson is no stranger to the political wars in Washington. A Republican senator from Wyoming from 1979 to 1997, he was known for having one of the sharpest...
A Woman's Place Is in the Church
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Pat Wingert, Jessica Ramirez, Ian Yarett, and Daniel Stone The cause of the Catholic clergy's sex-abuse scandal is no mystery: insular groups of men often do bad things. So why not break up the all-male club? Here they...
But It Works on TV!
Byline: Sharon Begley Forensic 'science' often isn't. In a culture smitten by CSI, NCIS, and Bones, it wasn't surprising that the jury bought the blue-jeans testimony. Testifying in a 1989 murder trial in upstate New York, a forensic scientist...
Chaos Theory
Byline: Nick Summers The new rules of management for people who hate rules. And management. It's the kind of outcome most entrepreneurs only dream of. Last September, the financial-planning startup Mint.com was acquired by Intuit for $170 million--earning...
Cleaning Up Dirty Police in Russia
Byline: Owen Matthews In the wake of last week's suicide bombings in Moscow, many -reform-minded Russians feared that the renewed emphasis on national security would bolster Vice President Vladimir Putin's strong-arm policies. Instead, the violence...
Don't Trust the Regulators
Byline: Ezra Klein Financial reform can't be left to those who failed us before. Here's my problem with the financial-regulation package that Sen. Chris Dodd has proposed: it hands the very regulators who failed us in 2005 and 2006 and 2007 and...
Drama Etouffe
Byline: Joshua Alston If god is indeed in the details, then David Simon will someday make a most promising candidate for beatification. Simon has already come as close to living sainthood as a keyboard can get you. With The Wire, he created a dystopian...
Drowning in Hate
Byline: Ellis Cose Ugly rhetoric perverts our politics. Much has been made of the abuse showered on members of Congress at a recent tea-party demonstration on Capitol Hill. Georgia Congressman John Lewis was greeted with racial slurs. Emanuel...
Extremist Reaction
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff Even in a subculture where outlandish conspiratorial thinking is common, the Hutaree militia of southeast Michigan is on the fringe. The group's leaders invented their own theology--the "doctrine of the...
History of Women in Catholicism
FIRST CENTURY Mary Magdalene is a loyal follower of Jesus and prominent in his ministry. Jesus intervenes on her behalf in an argument she has with Peter, according to the Gospel of Thomas. FIRST CENTURY Women are the first witnesses to the...
How Revolutionary Are the Revolutionary Guards?
Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps is like no other military in the world. In the wake of the Islamic Revolution, which brought him to power in 1979, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini chose not to disband the shah's armed forces--but he didn't trust...
How to Build a Happy Company
Byline: Ted Leonsis Wall Street was perplexed last month when Google decided to flout China's censorship laws, routing Web users to an unrestricted search page based in Hong Kong. In the short term, the move threatens the company's foothold in the...
Microsoft's Unsung Success
Byline: Daniel Lyons Windows 7 is a smash hit. These days I almost feel bad for the guys at Microsoft. They've got what anyone in the world would consider a hit product on their hands, and guess what? Nobody cares. Everybody is so busy gushing...
Regulate, Baby, Regulate
Byline: Daniel Stone EPA chief Lisa Jackson is taking on the president's next big challenge: climate change. Will her hardball tactics persuade Congress to play along? Washington, D.C., is littered with the careers of bright, well-meaning public...
The Art of Darkness
Byline: Mac Margolis The new Chilean President, Sebastian Pinera, has his work cut out for him, and temblors and tsunamis may be just the beginning. In January, a month before the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that shook this South American nation, outgoing...
The Doomsday Dilemma
Byline: John Barry and Evan Thomas This Spring, Barack Obama will push toward his goal of a nuclear-free world. But the stiffest resistance may be at home. For many years, America's master plan for nuclear war with the Soviet Union was called...
The McCain Mutiny
Byline: David Margolick A maverick fights for his political life--and his soul. Late last month, at a dusty fairground outside Tucson, John McCain stood behind the person who is, at least for the next few years, surely his most important legacy...
The Politics of Self-Esteem
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Why everyone feels offended. Some while back, I proposed a concept that did not stick. I called it "the politics of self-esteem." My argument was that politics increasingly devotes itself to making people feel good...
The Real Green Revolution
Byline: Rana Foroohar Clean tech will create jobs, but subtly. There is no more fashionable solution to the current global recession than "green jobs." President Obama, Britain's Gordon Brown, Nicolas Sarkozy of France, and China's Hu Jintao...
The World's Best Eye on the Cosmos Goes Dark in Maryland
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Next week President Obama is slated to deliver his first speech on the administration's NASA policy, which calls for transferring routine space travel to private companies. The proposal has sparked fears of government layoffs...
What Went Wrong
Byline: George Weigel Don't blame celibacy. To fight the plague of sexual abuse, the church needs to become more Catholic, not less. Throughout what U.S. Catholics called the "Long Lent" of 2002, when every week seemed to bring revelations of...
Who Is Obama's Next Supreme Court Pick?
Byline: Michael Isikoff While much of Washington has been preoccupied with health care, a small group of White House lawyers has been focused on another perennially contentious issue: naming the next Supreme Court justice. Although there are no...
You've Got Mail
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh The postal service lost $3.8 billion last year, but at least it's still got one big booster: Hollywood. Most of us use Facebook, Twitter, cell phones, -YouTube, and blogs to communicate, but the movies are still trafficking...