Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 05, August 2

Alan Mulally: 'It's like a Moon Shot'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria ***** Correction: Editor's note: This story originally stated that Alan Mulally was CEO of Boeing, rather than CEO of the Boeing Commerical Airplanes unit of the company. Newsweek regrets the error. ***** Ford's CEO...
America's New Icons
Byline: Joshua Alston In spite of quickly becoming an international phenomenon, Nicole Polizzi would probably not feel welcome in France. Not because of the unfair yet persistent perception that the French are less than hospitable to tourists, but...
Arianna's Answer
Byline: Daniel Lyons The Huffington Post may have figured out the future of journalism. But it's going to be a very difficult future. If you had to declare a winner among Internet media companies today, the victor easily would be Arianna Huffington....
Don't Boycott Israel
Byline: Jacob Weisberg The very idea is repellent. If you follow the news closely enough, you might have caught a small item recently noting that Meg Ryan had canceled a scheduled appearance at a film festival in Jerusalem to protest Israeli...
Gop 2012
Byline: Daniel Stone "Follow the money" is standard advice for anyone trying to understand Washington. Even though no GOP politician has formally declared a run for president in 2012, gauging how much money potential candidates have raised for their...
Havana Dreaming
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores After 50 years, the U.S. travel ban on Cuba has not made the island any more free. But those Americans pressing to lift it are now closer to success than ever before. Nobody would accuse Guillermo Farinas of being soft...
I Heart NJ
Byline: Andrew Romano At times, New Jersey can seem like the least romantic of states. OK, make that all of the time. So the idea of tastemakers and trendsetters taking their cues from the Garden State has always seemed ridiculous. Especially in...
L.A. Residential
Byline: Nancy Cook In the Los Angeles of the future, workers might live in 'retail communities' or commute via elevator. In the year 2030, few Americans will toil in cubicles for eight hours a day. Instead, they'll write e-mails or take phone...
No Atheists in Foxholes
Byline: Lisa Miller And other myths of the recession. Every day, the economist Daniel Hungerman looks at the graph that hangs above his desk at the University of Notre Dame. One jagged line goes down and up. This is America's gross domestic product...
Now Can I Say $*%@!#& on Television?
Byline: Number 17, NYC and Nick Summers Yes--if it's used as an adjective, say, or after 10 p.m. Indecency rules have been in flux since the early days of radio. Back then, the FCC's sole weapon was to revoke broadcast licenses, so networks, and...
Original Sin in France
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Tracy McNicoll It's become a scandalous summer in France. Allegations are mounting that the octogenarian heiress to the billions of the L'Oreal cosmetics fortune, Liliane Bettencourt, may have had some unseemly dealings...
Pakistan Loses Control
Byline: Ron Moreau The Afghan Taliban's three operational chiefs have gone deep underground, senior insurgent officials tell NEWSWEEK, and meetings of the leadership have been canceled until further notice. The three--former Taliban civil-aviation...
Policing Main Street
Byline: Ezra Klein The poor also need protection. Sometime this spring, Democrats stopped calling Sen. Chris Dodd's bill "financial reform" and started calling it "Wall Street reform." Most of the reporting focused on the legislation's affect...
Read On
Byline: Daniel Lyons Why the iPad hasn't killed the Kindle. Amazon's Kindle e-reader is a terrific device, but a lot of people, myself included, figured that once Apple's iPad came out, the poor little Kindle would be toast. The first thing I...
Stifled by Soundbites
Byline: Ellis Cose The Sherrod brouhaha is distressing evidence of why we can't have an honest public discourse about race. Taken on its merits and in context, it was a beautiful tale of redemption and reconciliation: a story of one woman's journey...
The Big Hiring Freeze
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Profits are up, but cost-cutting continues. Judging from corporate profits, we should be enjoying a powerful economic recovery. During the recession, profits dropped by about a third, apparently the worst decline since...
The Reinvention of the Reverend
Byline: Allison Samuels and Jerry Adler Why the indefatigable Al Sharpton still has work to do. And what his evolution tells us about race and politics in Obama's America. If the Rev. Al Sharpton didn't exist, he would have had to be invented....
What's Really Human?
Byline: Sharon Begley The trouble with student guinea pigs. Where would psychology be without lab rats--by which I mean American undergraduates? These human guinea pigs have spent hours in psych labs staring at optical illusions to reveal how...
When the Facts Get in the Way
Byline: Jon Meacham My family and I have spent most of July in Tennessee, which has put me in the position of being in touch with but not obsessed by the news cycle. (Though there is not really a cycle to news anymore. It is more of a treadmill.)...
Why Do IQ Scores Vary by Nation?
Byline: Katie Baker global differences in intelligence is a sensitive topic, long fraught with controversy and still tinged by the disgraceful taint of pseudosciences such as craniometry that strove to prove the white "race" as the most clever of...