Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 10, September 6

Blacks Are Getting Happier
Byline: Julia Baird Whites are not. Ask your mother why. it's been an ugly time in race relations lately. Radio host Laura Schlessinger used the N word 11 times in five minutes; Shirley Sherrod, a black woman who preached redemption, was accused...
Catch of the Day
Byline: Julia Reed Gulf seafood may be the most tested, and safest, fish you can find. When President Obama took his August microvacation along the Gulf of Mexico, he swam in the water, munched on fish tacos, and said, "Let me be clear. Seafood...
Class Is Very Much in Session in China
Byline: Isaac Stone Fish Although China has far higher ambitions than to be the world's factory, you wouldn't know that by looking at its best schools, whose students hail overwhelmingly from China's urban minority. Consider Tsinghua and Peking...
Clean Slate Time
Byline: Keith Libbey and Evan Thomas How about this for a tax plan: cut most people's taxes by half, eliminate the need to file returns, and provide the Treasury with a better way to reduce the deficit. Sound impossible? It's not. Here's how to...
Let Reformation Begin at Ground Zero
Byline: Jon Meacham The debate over the Islamic center in lower Manhattan--the mosque with a pool and a prayer room--is not a matter of being for religious liberty and thus for the center, nor is it one of being against the center and therefore...
Let the Good Times Roll
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Will high-flying hopes succumb to the swamp of the 'Big Sleazy'? Not if the latest Crescent City crusader can help it. Throughout New Orleans's seedy, scandal-ridden history, many a crusading mayor has swept into office...
Naysayers Are Not Always Right
Israel's U.S. envoy on reviving 'the spirit of Camp David.' An Israeli prime minister widely described as a hawk, and an Arab leader perilously isolated and reviled by the radicals, enter into peace talks--what chance do they have of succeeding?...
No Americans in France
Byline: Daniel Gross But the decline in travel may be a blessing. After traversing a mountain path 6,000 feet up in the Swiss Alps last week, where cows with clunky bells far outnumbered people, I stumbled into a bare-bones restaurant--and was...
No Headline
How and why the plan will work: Isn't the VAT too hard on low-income people??..... Won't there be a lot of tax evasion??..... Won't there be winners and losers??...What about corporations and proprietorships??... How do companies set withholding...
Obama's Old Deal
Why the 44th president is no FDR--and the economy is still in the doldrums. Barack Obama was "incredulous" at what he was hearing, said one of his top economic advisers. The president had spent his first year in office overseeing the biggest government...
The Face of Iraqi Democracy
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh Ahmad Chalabi may not be what his U.S. backers wanted--but he's what they got. Salih Mutlak can only wonder where in Iraq he might find justice. As one of the country's leading Sunni politicians, he was puzzled and...
The Female Factor
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Will three women really change the court? Much has been made of the fact that Elena Kagan's ascent to the Supreme Court means that for the first time in American history there will be three women on the high court. But...
The Frida Fighters
Byline: Jennie Yabroff When it comes to forgery scandals, this one is the grandma of them all. Frida Kahlo is, in the words of one of her many scholars, the most famous painter in the world. Not the most famous female painter, not the most famous...
'The Illustrated Man'
Byline: Jonathan Alter Obama's enemies have painted him as an alien threat. Can he fight the flight from facts? "I'd like to burn them off," says the Illustrated Man in Ray Bradbury's 1951 science-fiction classic of that name. "I've tried sandpaper,...
The Man We Knew Too Much
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Jonathan Franzen is a great writer. Should it matter if he's not a great guy? Jonathan Franzen spends most of the three-minute author video for his new novel, Freedom, explaining how uncomfortable he is with the idea of...
The Man Who Would Be Speaker
Byline: Howard Fineman John Boehner's improbable cool. Is Rep. John Boehner an empty suit--a sharp suit, to be sure, one Don Draper might wear--or is there more there? Sitting with him in the book-lined conference room of the City Club in Cleveland...
The Misinformants
Byline: Lisa Miller What 'stealth jihad' doesn't mean. Here is the latest semantic assault from the party that brought you "Islamo-facism" (circa 2005) and "Axis of Evil" (2002). The term "stealth jihad" is suddenly voguish among politically...
The Taliban vs. the Mosque
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau Taliban officials know it's sacrilegious to hope a mosque will not be built, but that's exactly what they're wishing for: the success of the fiery campaign to block the proposed Islamic cultural center and prayer...
The Unlikely Peacemaker
Byline: Dan Ephron; With Joanna Chen Netanyahu says he'll 'surprise the critics and skeptics.' really? Israeli prime ministers don't usually have time for long chats with people outside their circle of advisers and deputies. Yet the day before...
Unfit for Execution
Byline: Lynn Litchfield For six years, I regularly spent an hour talking and listening through a small slot in a metal door. On the other side was the only woman on death row in Virginia, an inmate who pleaded guilty to hiring two men to kill her...