Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 22

Adjusting to a Life of Endless Calculations: Since Emma Developed Diabetes, She Has Learned More about the Body Than Most People Ever Will
Byline: Shelley Lowenstein It's been more than a year since our 15-year-old daughter, Emma, was diagnosed with type I, juvenile, diabetes. Fifteen months--that's 1,445 insulin injections, and at least 2,910 finger pricks to test her blood sugar...
All in the Family: Scientists Find the Oldest Fossil of a Human Ancestor Ever-A 7 Million-Year-Old Skull That Is Shaking Up Theories of Human Origins
Byline: Fred Guterl Ahounta Djimdoumalbaye awoke before sunrise with his three fellow hunters. It was July 19, 2001, and they had driven nine days through the Djourab desert, a vast, primordial desolation in the central African country of Chad where...
Flight Paths: A New Math: Airlines: As Big Carriers Struggle to Retain Business Travelers and Budget Fliers Keep Expanding, the Industry May Be Splitting in Two
Byline: John Ghazvinian It was on the plane to Newark that Uwe Kiefert caught a glimpse of the future. A marketing manager for a German pharmaceutical company, he booked himself a business-class ticket on the morning flight out of Dusseldorf. He'd...
Gadgets: Crank Up the Volume: Advice for Improving Sound from Portable CD Players
Byline: Weston Kosova You love your portable CD or MP3 player, but the thin, tinny sound it produces makes you want to pull your home stereo around in a wagon. Don't blame the hardware. It's your headphones that stink. Even a run-of-the-mill portable...
Getting off the Beaten Track: Tourism: The Travel Industry Today Needs to Cater to a New Class of Consumers-Savvy, Value-Conscious and Eager for a Taste of Excitement in Their Travels
Byline: Rana Foroohar A decade or so ago, Africans got the notion that tourism might be an answer to their continent's desperate poverty. What model did they have in mind? Mediterranean resorts, mostly. So they built vast beach complexes in Kenya,...
Harkening Back to Texas: The Market's Tumbling, Confidence Is Soft and Bush Is Facing Questions about What He Did and When He Did It Long Ago. the Battle to Calm Investors, Rein in CEOs-And Keep the Past at Bay
Byline: Howard Fineman It was what they call in west Texas "a short-fuse deal," George W. Bush's accountant recalls. In Midland parlance, Robert McClesky explained, that meant Bush--a boyhood buddy and longtime client--needed a hunk of fast cash....
Hog Heaven: Harley at 100: Movies-And a Few Bikers-Have Made Motorcyclists Seem like Bad Boys. but Most Are Middle-Aged and Middle Class
Byline: George F. Will Milwaukee--in 1903, young men (the hyperkinetic president was just 45) were on the move. The Wright brothers--Wilbur, 36, and Orville, 32--left their bicycle shop in Dayton to take their 12-second, 120-foot flight at Kitty...
'I Felt like I Wanted to Hurt People': Emergency Rooms Report the Violent Return of PCP
Byline: Suzanne Smalley and Debra Rosenberg Mike is hardly a seasoned drug user. When the shy 16-year-old bought marijuana in the bathroom of his suburban Hartford, Conn., high school, he didn't know what it was supposed to smell like. The stuff...
It Looks Marvelous: Rhino's New Box Set Taps into Your '80S Nostalgia. Don't Have Any? You Will
Byline: Lorraine Ali You knew it had to happen: the kitschy-cool '70s revival is finally... well, history. Now peg-leg jeans and pre-ripped T shirts are making their way up from ultrahip clubs in New York City to malls near you, and so is the new-wave...
Let's Stay in Style: Hotels: The Old Model Was Generic and Familiar. the New Model Is All about Surprising the Guest
Byline: Stefan Theil "You are where you stay," hotel owner Ian Schrager once said. If that's true, then many of us are Holiday Inns. And by the same token, many of us are going to become much more hip, as chic designer hotels come to dominate the...
New Rules for Stocks: Too Few Investors Are Prepared for Meager Market Returns
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn It's almost over. Our love affair with stocks is going to fade. We'll get another little flutter of the heart, when the current business recovery lifts the market once again. Long-term investors will keep putting money...
Newsmakers
Byline: Allison Samuels A Star Is Driven Will Smith has always been a man with a plan. With plans. Back when he was the rapper known as the Fresh Prince, he wanted to become an actor. As a movie star, he wanted to go beyond slam-bang summer action...
Perspectives
"In the corporate world, sometimes things aren't exactly black and white when it comes to accounting practices." President George W. Bush, in response to claims that he was involved in accounting improprieties in his financial dealings with Harken...
Powell's Plan: President Arafat-Without Powers: An Exclusive Look into the White House Plans for the Middle East
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Roy Gutman Yasir Arafat's future is on the table--and, the White House hopes, out of his hands. George W. Bush's wish to be rid of the Palestinian leader will be among the topics in key talks this week in New York and Washington...
Rodney King Revisited: A Police Beating Caught on Tape Takes California Back
Byline: Andrew Murr Ten years after the Los Angeles riots, a videotaped beating of a black male by a white cop is once again fueling racial anger. This time the setting was a gas station in Inglewood, Calif., a racially mixed city on L.A.'s southern...
Sticky Business: With the Stock Tanking and the SEC Looking into Accounting Practices at the Company He Used to Run, Cheney Has Been Noticeably Absent from the Debate over How to Fix Corporate America
Byline: Allan Sloan and Johnnie L. Roberts When President Bush came to Wall Street to jawbone chief executives about corporate responsibility, Dick Cheney, the vice president and a former CEO himself, wasn't with him. When Bush met at the White...
Technology: Networking Made Easy: A Smattering of Geeky Parents Have Brought Networking Home-Now It's Easier and Cheaper to Set Up
Byline: N'Gai Croal and Bruce R. Jaffe Computer networks used to be a strictly office thing, characterized by tangles of wires behind your desk, weird words like Ethernet and whole teams of specialists whose job was just to keep the thing working....
The Editor's Desk: Mark Whitaker Revisits France, the Horrors of World Wars II and the September 11 Attacks
Byline: -Mark Whitaker From the outside, it looks like hundreds of other small towns in the French countryside. It has the same narrow, winding streets, fragrant shops and centuries-old stone houses with wooden doors and shutters. But it's what...
The End of the Age of Estrogen: Women Were Told for Decades That Hormone-Replacement Therapy Would Protect Their Hearts and Preserve Their Youth. Now the Evidence Is in, and an Era Is Over
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley and Karen Springen Menopause may be a natural event, but the medical establishment has never viewed it as an auspicious one. "The years of the climacteric are the most troublesome in married life," the Czechoslovakian physician...
The Fire That Won't Die Out: A Tragedy at a Girls' School in Mecca Gives Saudi Rulers an Opening to Break Down Ancient Barriers. but Will They?
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Rod Nordland The fire started among thrown-away books and papers. One of the teenagers at Girls' Intermediate School No. 31 in Mecca, the holiest city in Islam, was sneaking a cigarette before classes. A hall monitor...
The Kid Is All Right: He Was the King of Hollywood until Drugs, Scandals and Strokes Brought Him Down. but Don't Count Robert Evans out. A New Film Has Made This Larger-Than-Life Man Hot and Hip Again-And He's Enjoying Every Moment
Byline: David Ansen "Three years ago I was over and out," declares the producer Robert Evans. "I was a 68-year-old, infamous, over-the-hill Jew trying to get a job. There are miracles in life." Evans, wearing his trademark tinted, oversize glasses,...
What's A Woman to Do? There Are Lots of Ways to Treat Menopause and Ward off the Diseases That Accompany Aging
Byline: Claudia Kalb No doubt you're confused about hormone-replacement therapy. And, like thousands of women who bombarded their doctors' offices and sent help! messages to Internet bulletin boards last week, you're probably wondering what to do....
Whose Side Is Bush on? It Turns out a Good Chunk of the 'New Economy' Was Something Very Old-Ripping off the Shareholders
Byline: Jonathan Alter This corporate greed thing is big. how big? well, did you know that roughly one third of all profits in the boom years was the result of a single accounting gimmick? That's right: the research firm Sanford Bernstein studied...