Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 19

A Better Play? How to Maximize Returns on Your Other Big Investment: Your Home
Byline: Kevin Peraino For Americans dismayed by their plummeting 401(k)s, there's a small solace: in many cities housing prices have exploded, with annual gains of between 8 and 10 percent. But should you really bet your retirement on real estate?...
'Ain't No Low Profile': The Redskins' Brash Young Owner and His Legendary New Coach Talk about Winning, Losing, Chemistry and Patience
Byline: Mark Starr When Dan Snyder bought Washington's revered Redskins in 1999 for $800 million, the brash, young marketing mogul, then just 34, expected to bring championship glory to his hometown and himself. Instead, his NFL entry proved one...
And I'm Watching It All from My Window: I've Always Been Taught That There's Life beyond West Oakland. but I Shouldn't Be Unique
Byline: Chinaka Hodge It was a typical Friday afternoon, and I was typically rushed. I was throwing on a T shirt, glossing over my hair and scanning the poem I would recite a few minutes later at La Pena, a cultural center downtown, when I caught...
And Justice for All: John Ashcroft Crowed over the Arrest of Alleged 'Dirty Bomber' Jose Padilla. but Do the Feds Have a Case?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Word spread quickly through the Charleston Naval Station last June: a big-time terrorist was headed for the brig. An entire wing of the base's military lockup was emptied out. And when the prisoner arrived--31-year-old Jose...
Anxious in Sioux Falls: When It Comes to What to Do Next, Most Americans Are Decidedly. Confused. Politicians Better Beware
Byline: Howard Fineman A high-school history teacher in Sioux Falls, S.D., Wade Tirrel was trained to take the long view. So in 1998, at 28, he established a 401(k) with his wife through her employer. Their goal: added retirement security for themselves,...
AOL's Board Is Digging In: As the Media Merger Hits the Rocks, Activist Directors Are Getting More Involved in Rebuilding the Company
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts The decision haunts them. Forty-nine floors above midtown Manhattan, Time Warner's directors met in secrecy on a Sunday 31 months ago. One by one, all 13--including Stephen F. Bollenbach, CEO of Hilton; Reuben Mark, CEO...
Beyond Baghdad: Expanding Target List
Byline: Roy Gutman and John Barry While still wrangling over how to overthrow Iraq's Saddam Hussein, the Bush administration is already looking for other targets. President Bush has called for the ouster of Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat. Now some...
Burned! Why We Need to Fix the 401 (K)
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn For Chris McCullough, it was the end of a lovely dream. At 61, she works for a nonprofit health system in Cleveland and sees all around her the many risks that imperil life. So she chose what she thought was a careful course...
Can 8.0 Save the Chat Room? AOL Has Improved Its Pitiful E-Mail Component with a Way to Push Spam out of the Way but, Incredibly, There's Still No 'Forward' Button
Byline: Steven Levy Even if he hadn't been just appointed the new CEO of America Online, Jonathan Miller would have made a nice poster boy for the online service. He certainly has the technical savvy to handle the wilds of the Internet without training...
Daybreak in a Concrete Sky: The Melancholy Beth Orton Shows Us Her Sunny Side
Byline: Lorraine Ali You might expect Beth Orton to be quiet, withdrawn, maybe even a little spacey in person. Her new album, "Daybreaker," is full of beautiful washes of melancholy, blue vocals and simple lyrics that convey the most abstract of...
Elvis Lives: His Fan Base Is Graying, but the Folks Who Run Presley Enterprises Are Luring a New Generation. Forget Fat Elvis. the King's Become Disneyfied, Digitized-And May Head for Broadway
Byline: David J. Jefferson Fifty-five-year-old Sandy Cox of Hernando, Miss., stands silently with her young nieces and nephews over the grave adorned with plastic roses, a "Love Me Tender" votive candle and a headstone that reads ELVIS AARON PRESLEY....
GAMES: Hooked on Saving the World
Byline: -Peter Suciu Does your significant other disappear between the hours of 10 p.m. and 4 a.m.? Have the words "orc" and "necromancer" suddenly entered her vocabulary? Then it's official. She's crossed over to the dark side. Fantasy games--with...
Gidget Girls: Half a Century before 'Blue Crush,' the World of Surfing Was Changed by a Handful of Girls Who Just Wanted to Have Fun on the Waves at Malibu. Now the Original Princesses of the Pipeline Tell Their Story
Byline: Devin Gordon There were a few guys in the water at Malibu that Vicki Flaxman just wouldn't mess with, even if they did cut her off in the lineup or snake her on a wave. Like Buzzy Trent, who played football--he was just too big. If he wanted...
How Al Qaeda Slipped Away: The War in Afghanistan Is Widely Regarded as a Great Success. but One Key Objective Was Not Achieved. the Inside Story of Al Qaeda's Mass Escape
Byline: Rod Nordland, Sami Yousafzai and Babak Dehghanpisheh The Afghan foot patrol was so hot on the trail of fleeing Qaeda troops that the pursuers could literally smell blood. Across the high passes of the Tora Bora range they raced, with blankets...
How Are We Doing? the First Data on 9-11 and the National Psyche Are in. New Yorkers Suffered the Most-And TV Didn't Help
Byline: Claudia Kalb We all know that the nation's psyche was badly battered on September 11. But how badly? And for how long? Now researchers have quantified the scope of the problem. Among the findings published last week in the Journal of the...
JOBS: Will Work for Fun
Byline: -Susannah Meadows Marc Bobinsky can't believe he got the job. The 55-year-old education consultant and former teacher from Mackinac Island, Mich., has a pair of master's degrees but no experience doing this kind of work. "Somebody didn't...
Mosquito Season Turns Deadly
Byline: -Anne Underwood Few things appear more threatening than new diseases, especially ones that are potentially fatal. The West Nile virus, which can cause a deadly encephalitis (or brain swelling), has already killed seven patients this year...
Newsmakers
Talk Dirty To Me Now that America has marveled at the size of her breasts and her butt, let's talk about Anna Nicole Smith's big mouth. In the top-rated debut of "The Anna Nicole Show," TV's new reality star not only chatted about masturbating,...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation Sources From Top To Bottom, Left To Right: Boston Globe, CNN, USA Today, CNN, AP, CNN, New York Times, New Yorker, New York Times, New York Post "I would not want you to leave my mother on the table." Surgical technician at a Cambridge,...
Spamming the World: In a Popularity Contest, 'Bulk E-Mailers' Would Rank Just above Child Pornographers. but the Scourge of the Internet Is Defending Its Vocation
Byline: Brad Stone and Jennifer Lin Al Ralsky would like you to have thick, lustrous hair. He also wants to help you buy a cheap car, get a loan regardless of your credit history and earn a six-figure income from the comfort of your home. But according...
TECHNOLOGY: Home Work: Fix Your Office
Byline: Daniel Mcginn and Joan Raymond Anyone who brings work home at night knows the feeling: dinner is over, the kids are in bed, but you just can't face the messy pit you call your home office. Trevor Hughes knew that phenomenon all too well....
The Editor's Desk
Byline: -Mark Whitaker You may think you know Jane Bryant Quinn. If you're a longtime subscriber to NEWSWEEK, you've followed her wise financial advice for 25 years. You've read her syndicated columns and seen her ageless picture (she really is...
The Nature of Human Nature: Civilization's Enemies Attack Civilization's Core Idea-That Human Nature Is Not Infinitely Plastic, That People Cannot Be Socialized to Do Anything
Byline: George F. Will Little by little we were taught all these things. We grew into them. -Adolph Eichmann These are the best of times for the worst of people. And for the toxic idea at the core of all the most murderous ideologies of the...
The Tobacco Sham: New Farm Equipment, Fighting Satan and Sprinklers: How the States Are Spending Their Settlement Money
Byline: Seth Mnookin Few people depend on tobacco more than Keith Beavers, a fifth-generation tobacco farmer in North Carolina. So when 46 states negotiated a $246 billion settlement in 1998 in lieu of suing tobacco companies for the cost of treating...