Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 24

A Great Divide: Europe and America Are Largely Split over Whether a War to Change the Regime in Iraq Is Now Justified. but the Divisions Go Much Deeper Than That-To Differing Perceptions of History and Politics, Power and God
Byline: Christopher Dickey Lines of crosses, thousands upon thousands overlooking the beaches of Normandy, bear witness to the vast wars that raged across Europe in the last century and to the blood of Americans who lost their lives in them. People...
All-Too-True Love: 'All the Real Girls' Gets a Real Tricky Subject Just Right
Byline: Devin Gordon The best movie of the last 20 years about young people in love is 1989's "Say Anything... ," and even that one blows it in the end. Lloyd and Diane board a plane together and move to England, where they... what? Live happily...
Anatomy of the Threat: It Began Months Ago with Scraps of Paper in an Afghan Cave, and Crescendoed into a National Panic Attack about Terror. the Inside Story of Al Qaeda's Latest Moves
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Evan Thomas The headline on the FBI document was stark and declarative: Al-Qaeda set to attack. The dossier, a classified summary of CIA intelligence on Al Qaeda as of the end of January, put together for distribution...
'Are You Hot?' Is It Nuclear? Jerry Springer Seems Less Radical Every Day; Maury Povich Presides over the DNA Testing of Infants Whose Father May Be This Guy or That
Byline: Anna Quindlen The morning after the Michael Jackson interview aired in the United States, the Feds raised the terror-alert level to high. The connection is apparent. Only people living in a panic caldron set to simmer could sit through two...
A Watchful Eye: Politics Is Clouding the Homeland-Security Picture. the Reality and the Rhetoric
Byline: Steven Brill If you lock three of your car's four doors, is it three times safer than if you locked only one? Obviously not. If all four doors aren't secured, the car isn't safe. Then again, suppose a thief can't tell which of the doors...
Boom before the Bombs: American Ordnance May Soon Rain over Iraq. but Prices for Homes and Land Are Going Nowhere but Up These Days
Byline: Melinda Liu Mahmoud Yassin never thought of himself as a real-estate speculator. But 11 years ago the Baghdad hardware dealer couldn't resist the low prices for property in Karbala. Thousands of inhabitants had fled the city during Desert...
Capitalism Must Develop More of a Conscience: In Today's Trust-Starved Climate, Our Market-Driven System Is under Attack. Businesses Need to Adopt More of a Social Philosophy
Byline: Klaus Schwab Today, large parts of the population feel that business has become detached from society--that business interests are no longer aligned with societal interests. And it is not enough to say that business has been discredited...
Coping with Anxiety: Science Shows That Meditation, Massage, Yoga-Even Laughter-Can Change Bad Habits in the Brain
Byline: Claudia Kalb There's Cipro, potassium iodide and the smallpox vaccine to ward off biological agents. But is there an antidote to anxiety? "I'm very frightened," said Julie White, as she exited Manhattan's Sonic Yoga last week. But she has...
Drugs: Taking the Worry Cure: Anxiety Medication Can Mute Our Fears; but Should It?
Byline: Karen Springen Americans are jittery. And why not? It's little wonder people feel an extra-strong impulse to reach for pills they think will improve their mood. Even before September 11, drugs like Prozac, an antidepressant, and Xanax, which...
Exclusive: Risking a Civil War
Byline: Owen Matthews, Sami Kohen and John Barry Turkey is raising its price for allowing U.S. forces to invade Iraq from its territory. In early negotiations with the United States, Ankara spoke of sending in Turkish troops to set up a "buffer...
'G' Hits the Funny Spot: Wazzup Wit Dis Ali G? Why He Asks Old Dudes Dem Wack Questions? and He a Cambridge Man, Why He Talk like Dis?
Byline: Lorraine Ali It's unlikely that former attorney general Richard Thornburgh knew what he was getting into when he agreed to be interviewed about American law by a self-proclaimed British hip-hop journalist named Ali G. "Yo diggity," G begins....
Globalization Goes to War: It Might Make Sense to Invest in a South Korean Company. but How Risky Is It to Bet on a Company Next Door to a Nuclear Megalomaniac?
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson What may ultimately be said of a war with Iraq, assuming it occurs, is that it made the world safe for globalization--or that it proved the world unfit for globalization. Wars produce surprises, for good and ill. No one...
Holes in the Safety Net: A Startling Number of Sex Offenders Are off the Grid
Byline: Andrew Murr Megan's Law was made for sex offenders like Vincent Santana. With six convictions for rape, sexual assault and related sex crimes since the 1970s, the Las Vegas resident was just the type of ex-con the cops--and neighbors--would...
How to Can the Spam: I'm Sick of It. You're Sick of It. and It Won't Be Easy to Stop. but the First Step in Controlling Unwanted E-Mail Is to Pass a Law
Byline: Steven Levy Looking at my bloated in box, it's amazing to realize that less than a measly decade ago, you could have had a reasonable debate about whether the Internet should accommodate any commercialism. Now the argument is whether a vile...
In Houston, a Case of Vengeance in Overdrive
Byline: Anne Belli Gesalman It would have been Clara and David Harris's 11th wedding anniversary on Valentine's Day last week. Instead, she stood quaking in a Houston courtroom as a jury sentenced her to 20 years in prison for murdering her unfaithful...
Mail Call: 'They Slipped the Surly Bonds of Earth'
Our Feb. 10 coverage of the Columbia shuttle tragedy drew heartfelt responses from around the country. "Your cover reduced me to tears. I couldn't help but contrast the astronauts' infectious smiles with the starry blaze in the sky," a reader from...
Microsoft Gets a Clue from Its Kiddie Corps: Forget Productivity. the New Softie Project Is an Irreverent Time Waster Called Threedegrees
Byline: Steven Levy Bill Gates didn't get it. Neither did Steve Ballmer. In July 2000, when Tammy Savage, a 30-year-old manager in business development, went before Microsoft's heavy hitters and presented a case that they were clue-challenged in...
My Engine Is Bigger Than Your Engine: Carmakers Are Locked in a Horsepower Arms Race
Byline: Keith Naughton Maneuvering among all the SUVs on the road used to be a white-knuckle ride for Judy Podkulski. Her car, with its puny four-cylinder engine, was no match for the monsters of the motorway. So Podkulski traded in her economy...
Newsmakers
Byline: Ana Figueroa; Seth Mnookin No Roman Holiday Now that director Roman Polanski has his expected Oscar nomination--his fourth--for "The Pianist," will he return from exile in Paris to attend the ceremony? Polanski, now 69, fled the United...
Now, the Big Squeeze: For Many, the Ideal Body Requires Good Bones-Of Steel
Byline: Peg Tyre Oprah looked positively willowy in the corset dress she wore to the Emmys last fall. And Kelly Osbourne looked suddenly svelte when she hit the stage wearing a Goth-black corset top over jeans at a runway show two weeks ago. The...
Our Bodies, Our Fears: As They Reach for the Duct Tape, Americans Say They're More Anxious Than Ever. Scientific Research about How Our Brains and Bodies Process Fear Can Teach Us How to Live with Long-Term Stress
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Anthony Lepre started feeling awful almost as soon as Tom Ridge put the nation on high alert for a terrorist attack last week. The normally well-adjusted Los Angeles chiropractor started tossing and turning instead of drifting...
Perspectives
Byline: QUOTATION SOURCES FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: FOX NEWS, REUTERS, NEW YORK TIMES, THE HILL, NEW YORK TIMES, ASSOCIATED PRESS, SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, SPLASH NEWS, NEW YORK TIMES, THE MIRROR "Fight the agents of the Devil. God will give us...
Protests: We Are the World
Byline: Paul Tolme With only 203 residents, Silver Plume, Colo., hardly qualifies for a seat on the U.N. Security Council. But that hasn't stopped the former mining town from sending a letter to the White House objecting to war in Iraq. "We're a...
Sci-Fi War Uniforms? Nanotechnology: MIT and the Army Team Up to Design the Perfect Protection for Soldiers
Byline: Martha Brant It was the ultimate laboratory experiment. Prof. Ned Thomas and eight scientists from MIT last month traded in their white coats for military outfits at Fort Polk, La. The team was there to study soldiers in the field--and particularly...
Split Decision on a Slugfest: Books: Two New Accounts of the HP-Compaq Merger Fight Conjure Up Two Different Carly Fiorinas
Byline: Mark N. Vamos If the collapse of the new economy hasn't completely wiped you out, you can always spend any money you have left on books about it. Two new guides for rubble pickers, George Anders's "Perfect Enough" and Peter Burrows's "Backfire,"...
Technology: Improving Sound, Easing Fury: The Battle between Oralists and Signers Is Ending, and the Latest Generation of Deaf Kids Has Won
Byline: Jim Reisler My daughter, Julia, was 5 years old when I first heard her swear. "Jesus!" she said one night at the dinner table in response to some now forgotten annoyance. Like most parents, I was outwardly mortified, wondering how she'd...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker What constitutes strong leadership in times of crisis? Some members of the Bush administration act as though it's all about talking tough and standing tall. Yet history shows that our greatest leaders knew how to rally the...
The Hard Times in Silicon Valley: Money: A Top Venture Capitalist Reflects on the Go-Go '90S and Looks Ahead to New Tech Investments
Byline: Brad Stone If Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers is a big constellation in Silicon Valley's universe of venture capital, Vinod Khosla, 49, is its brightest star. Though partner John Doerr gets more publicity, the Indian-born Khosla has...
The Show for Armchair Gearheads
Byline: Bret Begun If you drive a 1994 Suburban with 150,210 miles, your ride isn't quite "Cribs" material. But it's perfect for "Monster Garage," the Discovery Channel cult hit where a team of gearheads makes Geo Trackers into hot-air balloons...
This Isn't about Iraq Anymore
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In the fall of 1993 an Australian writer, Owen Harries, published an essay in Foreign Affairs magazine in which he prophesied "the collapse of the West." The West, he explained, has existed for centuries as a cultural concept....
Travel: A Floating Grad School
Byline: Arthur Frommer It's the super-star of the British travel industry, staffed with the likes of Oxford dons, Cambridge professors, curators of the Victoria and Albert Museum and eminent cleric-historians of the Anglican Church. And next winter...
We Need More Than Duct Tape: Yes, the Chances of Any One Person's Being Struck by Terror Are Tiny. but That's No Excuse for Bad Planning and Education
Byline: Jonathan Alter There are some things duct tape can't fix. If you put a big strip of it across the mouth of America, you still couldn't keep people from telling each other how anxious and, yes, a little fearful they feel just now. The...
Yahoo's Pony Tricks: Under Tech Outsider Terry Semel, the Company Is Proving That Dot-Coms Have More Than Just One
Byline: Brad Stone In the fat, happy days of the late 1990s, Yahoo was the Don Quixote of the Internet, blithely rushing at every opportunity it encountered. Employees came up with new ideas (such as offering driving directions and games online),...