Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 31

A Father's Words on Going to War: The 41st President Talks about His History with Saddam, What It Feels like to Send Troops into Combat, Bush II's Diplomacy and Those Troublesome French
Byline: Jon Meacham Watching the latest conflict with Iraq on TV was making former president George Bush so restless last Friday that he and his old secretary of State, James Baker, played a round of golf. "41" was in telephone touch with his son...
Bombs, Then Building: Even as Ordnance Exploded on Iraq, Debate Raged over Who Will Manage the Reconstruction
Byline: Michael Hirsh It was one of those what-are-we-fighting-for moments. As U.S. Marines occupied their first Iraqi city, the port of Umm Qasr, they did what America's fighting men have done since landing at the shores of Tripoli in 1804: they...
Flak Vests and Lucky Charms
Byline: Colin Soloway, Rod Nordland, Arian Campo-Flores, Kevin Peraino, Babak Dehghanpisheh Helicopters went down, Iraqi soldiers surrendered to journalists, Kurds fled into the mountains--and NEWSWEEK was there. Five correspondents, embedded or...
How the Kidnappers Controlled Elizabeth
Byline: Elise Christenson The message from Elizabeth Smart's family is that it is time for her to go back to her normal life. "Elizabeth's anxious to resume some sort of regular routine," says Chris Thomas, family spokesman. And late last week that...
Iraq's Most Wanted: They're Called the Dirty Nine. All Are Members of Saddam's Murderers' Club Marked for Certain Prosecution If They Survive the War for Baghdad
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Donatella Lorch Saddam Hussein's inner circle is a special kind of club. Only murderers need apply. "All the members were tested by Saddam in one way or another," explains an Arab intelligence chief who's dealt directly...
'I Was Sure I Was Dead'
Byline: Scott Johnson It wasn't until Friday that the Third Marine Expeditionary Brigade set out from a checkpoint west of Route 80, the primary artery between Iraq and Kuwait City. The trucks and armored cars moved slowly on the dirt tracks at...
Listen for the Human Voice
Byline: Jonathan Alter Sometimes a few words are worth a thousand pictures. Last Friday, Tom Brokaw sat talking to a group of retired military officers when the voice of a woman came over the air. Amid all the astonishing satellite gadgetry, she...
Live from Baghdad: As the Iraqi Regime Frays around Her, a NEWSWEEK Correspondent Copes with Nervous Editors, a Bureaucrat with No Fingernails and a Massive Bombing Campaign
Byline: Melinda Liu Saturday was a quiet spring day in Baghdad. Early in the morning I drove around town to look at the effects of the previous night's "shock and awe" airstrikes. Just a few hours before, the night sky had pulsed with crimson fireballs...
My Turn: I'm Afraid to Look, Afraid to Turn Away: Day and Night, I Watch My Husband's War Play out on TV. I Know What a Mixed Blessing That Can Be
Byline: Denise Gonsales It's a stressful time for my family. I'm eight months pregnant and my husband, Martin, a Black Hawk pilot based in Savannah, Ga., has been in Kuwait for more than two months. Not surprisingly, I have been glued to the television,...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: ABCNEWS.COM, CNN, CBSNEWS.COM, WKYC.COM, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, ABCNEWS.COM, The Washington Post, Press Release, "Good Morning America," CBSNEWS.COM, E! ONLINE "We will bring freedom...
Prizes for Bad Diplomacy
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The score-settling has begun. Oh, I don't mean between the Shiites, Sunnis, Kurds and Turkmen. The war is going well and these problems have not surfaced--yet. No, it is the great nations of the Western world that are taking...
Special Pullout: Mapping the War: A Detailed, Detachable Guide to the Geography of Conflict-The Region, Baghdad, the Country of Iraq and Its Demographics
It's the birthplace of civilization, the site of the first written word. Once known as Mesopotamia, Iraq has been in turmoil for 5,000 years. Conquered by the Persians, Alexander the Great, Arab Muslims and Ottoman Turks, it later became a British...
The 12 Year Itch: Yes, the Son Is Determined to Finish the Father's Business. but the Story Is More Complicated Than That. the Long Path to a Second Gulf War against Saddam-And the Men and Ideas That Helped to Pave the Way
Byline: Evan Thomas Dick Cheney likes to read history, especially military history. He disappears into his well-stocked library at the vice president's mansion for hours at a time, reading about Churchill and World War II or other war leaders in...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker When covering wars, journalists constantly weigh the imperative of personal safety against the desire to get a great story. And their editors are torn between the impulse to trust their reporters and the sense of institutional...
The Hour of Air Power
Byline: George Will On Jan. 15, 1945, Hitler--who had been at the western front, where the Battle of the Bulge had blunted his last-gasp offensive in Belgium--was returning to Berlin by train when an SS colonel with a gift for gallows humor said:...
The Hunt at Home
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff Last week, while U.S. and allied forces hunted for Saddam Hussein, FBI agents began interviewing thousands of Iraqi nationals in search of any information about possible security threats inside the country....
The War Room: It Was a Bold Move: Speed the Battle Plan with a Risky Strike. but Team Bush Had a Man on the Inside. Behind the 'Target of Opportunity,' and What It Means for the Road to Baghdad
Byline: Evan Thomas and Daniel Klaidman He was the ultimate spy who came in from the cold. For months, the CIA and U.S. Special Forces had been working on the extraordinarily difficult and dangerous job of trying to penetrate Saddam Hussein's inner...
'We Will Incur Another Loss': The Iraq War Began without U.S. Military Access Via Turkey. but Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan Insists His Country Is Part of the American Coalition
Byline: Lally Weymouth No U.S. official notified Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan before the war began last week. That was not an accident. For months the Bush administration had sought Turkish permission to base troops in Turkey and...
W's Comfort Zone: Happy to Have the Messy Diplomacy Behind Him, Bush Settles into the Cadences of Commander in Chief
Byline: Tamara Lipper and Howard Fineman The Azores photo-op mini-summit was over, and Air Force One was flying back to Washington. Around the wooden table in the conference room, President George W. Bush and his aides worked on "the ultimatum speech."...