Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 23

Al Qaeda: Would-Be GI Spy?
Byline: Steve Tuttle and Michael Bociurkiw For most Qaeda recruits, stealth's the name of the game. So when "Amir" posted an offer to spy for the terrorist network in a chat room favored by Islamic extremists, the Feds pounced. "Amir," they say,...
A New Cloning Debate; A Scientific Breakthrough Inspires Hope for Future Cures and Reignites Vows to Outlaw Embryonic Research
Byline: Claudia Kalb It was an electric moment--the declaration of a milestone--couched in the precise language of science. "I am happy to announce the successful derivation of human embryonic stem cells from cloned human blastocysts," Dr. Woo Suk...
Anti-Americanism: Will We Be Booed?
Byline: Mark Starr and Nicki Gostin The American soccer team won't be going to the Olympics this summer, booted out of the Athens Games last week by Mexico. The 4-0 thrashing was bad enough, but the Mexican hosts added plenty of insult to the injury....
At Dell, He's No Second Fiddle; Michael Dell Founded the Computer Maker and Remains the Visionary of a Corporate Icon. but Kevin Rollins Is More Than a Right-Hand Man. Is This a Model for the Executive Suite?
Byline: Brad Stone Earlier this month, the two executives who run Dell played a gag video for employees, pretending to audition for a spot on Donald Trump's hit TV show, "The Apprentice." In the video, Michael Dell, the 38-year-old founder and CEO,...
Atkins under Attack; the Carb Wars Have Gone Guerrilla. Inside the Release of the Diet Doc's Medical Info-And the Group Responsible
Byline: Mary Carmichael Dr. Neal Barnard may come from a family of cattle ranchers, but he's got a beef against meat. For 19 years, the founder of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine has preached the virtues of veganism, accusing parents...
Bill Joy, to the World
Byline: Steven Levy Bill Joy is one of the top minds in computing, a technologist with a sweeping vision of the world. A cofounder of Sun Microsystems in 1982, he has accomplishments that range from working on the Java computing language to writing...
Black Market Nukes; Many in the Atomic Underground Claim They Were Ignorant, and Innocent. Will Anyone Be Punished?
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Sarah Schafer, With Mark Hosenball and John Barry in Washington and Ron Moreau in Pakistan A lone, elderly guard sits at the entrance to the Scomi Precision Engineering plant, a drab single-story building in the middle...
Calatrava Takes Flight; A Spanish Designer's Vision for the World Trade Center's Site Falls-Or Soars-Into Place
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan When the Spanish designer Santiago Calatrava unveiled his plans for the $2 billion transit station at the World Trade Center site in New York last month, he apologized for his imperfect English. "Let me draw for you what...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Here's a thought for those of you who'll need more income from your investments--if not today, then a few years from now when you retire. Put some money into dividend-paying stocks or a mutual fund that buys them. Congress...
Desecration? Dedication! Gay Couples Are Being Held to a Standard the Denizens of Vegas Chapels and Divorce Courts Never Had to Meet to Legally Come Together
Byline: Anna Quindlen And now for a short quiz: How many amendments are there in the Constitution? How many times may a senator be re-elected? Which president was the first commander in chief of the U.S. military? What do the stripes...
Facing Life after 'Sex'; Kim Cattrall Saved Her Best for Last on HBO's Beloved, Departing Hit. Now Comes the Hard Part: Starting Over
Byline: Allison Samuels Generally speaking, it's impolite to weep after sex. But if anyone's earned the right, it's Kim Cattrall, because this time was one for the ages. It lasted six years, she gave an award-worthy performance and, as Cattrall...
Family TV Goes Down the Tube; Yes, Janet Jackson Was Tacky, but Then It's Been Years since Some Parents Felt Safe Channel-Surfing with Their Kids. Can Hearings Really Help?
Byline: Marc Peyser, With Pat Wingert, Karen Springen, Devin Gordon and Jac Chebatoris Mel Karmazin and Paul Tagliabue are not the kind of guys who get chewed out very often. Karmazin is the president and COO of Viacom, parent of CBS and MTV. Tagliabue...
From Gunpowder Girl to Working Woman; We Manned the Factories for 'Our Boys,' but What We Learned There Made Us Want More for Ourselves
Byline: Sonya Jason, Jason lives in Woodland Hills, Calif. The shock waves caused by Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor reverberated through the remotest corners of our country, even the coal-mining town of Jefferson, Pa., where my family lived. My...
Hip Hop Big Top; Welcome to the One and Only UniverSoul Circus, the Coolest Show on Earth. Disco Elephants? Got 'Em
Byline: Lorraine Ali "Rolleeecoasta... of luv" sings the crowd, and the Poppin' Soul band cranks up the volume, sending vibrations through the bleachers. "Rolleecoasta, oh, oh, oh, oh." It's Tuesday night in Georgia, and 2,300 people have come to...
Intelligence: No U.S. Sources Inside Saddam's Inner Circle
Byline: Mark Hosenball One problem the CIA had in gathering prewar intelligence about Iraq was a lack of inside sources. In a little-noticed passage in his Feb. 5 Georgetown University speech, CIA Director George Tenet said: "We did not have enough...
Is This the Oscar Mafia? or Just a Very Nice Nursing Home with Powerful Friends? NEWSWEEK Investigates
Byline: Sean Smith Not to point fingers, but it's Kevin Spacey's fault. Four years ago, when he accepted the Screen Actors Guild award for his performance in "American Beauty," Spacey dedicated the trophy to the residents at the Motion Picture &...
Mail Call; A Case of 'Wanton Mass Deception'?
Americans continue to absorb the role that faulty intelligence played in landing us in a war with Iraq, the subject of our Feb. 9 Special Report. A reader wondered whether WMD should stand for "Wanton Mass Deception." Many are outraged by what one...
Mike to Mike: Hey, I Feel Your Pain; AT&T's Ex-CEO Michael Armstrong Knows What Disney's Eisner Is Going Through
Byline: Allan Sloan It's a safe bet that no one can identify better with Disney's Michael Eisner these days than former AT&T chief executive C. Michael Armstrong. After all, Comcast's raid on Disney is a carbon copy of its successful attack...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin Lindsay Lohan Lindsay Lohan, now 17, first charmed audiences in "The Parent Trap," took off a few years to be a kid, then returned to charm them again with last year's surprise smash "Freaky Friday." Now she's back with "Confessions...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotes from top to bottom: DAILY Telegraph, Newsweek, New York Times, The Washington Post, "Imus In The Morning," Ananova, Washington Times, Harvard Crimson, Associated Press, New York Times, Reuters "They gave me a good time... They were...
Predictions: More Fuzzy Math?
Byline: Daniel McGinn Ray Fair doesn't keep a crystal ball in his office. Instead, on his PC, the 61-year-old Yale economist crafts complex statistical models to forecast all sorts of events. One study predicted how marathon runners' times slow...
Psst. Let's Talk (Foreign) Affairs; Americans Have Not Had a Serious Presidential Debate over Foreign Policy since Jimmy Carter vs. Ronald Reagan. That Was a Generation Ago
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Once we've worked through the various scandals, rumors and gossip surrounding the American presidential election, could we please have a substantive discussion? In nine months...
Restaurants: 'The Best Cooking Is Simple Cooking'
Byline: Bret Begun Andre Soltner was a superstar chef before there were superstar chefs. In 34 years at Lutece (he left in 1994), he made it into a cornerstone of French cuisine in New York--and America. Citing financial woes, Lutece closed last...
Snap Judgment
Byline: Lorraine Ali, Devin Gordon, David Ansen Music America's Sweetheart Courtney Love Love is far more present on this solo debut than she has been in court. She's back to her raw beginnings, screaming out pop-punk "melodies" over garagey,...
Something about Mary; Gay-Marriage Proponents Target the Veep's Daughter
Byline: Mark Miller and Debra Rosenberg, With Karen Breslau in San Francisco In a campaign consumed with Vietnam War records and elusive weapons of mass destruction, the candidates have so far tiptoed around the season's touchiest wedge issue: gay...
Static on the Line; Washington's Crazy Quilt of Regulations Governing All the Different Phone Technologies Is Partly to Blame for the Churn in the Industry These Days
Byline: Allan Sloan, Sloan is NEWSWEEK's Wall Street editor. His e-mail is sloan@panix.com. America is obsessive about breakups. People can't get enough of Liza and David Gest, Ben and Jen, Britney and her boy toy (or husband) of the moment. But...
Super-Sizing the President; George Bush Has Never Fully Inhabited the Role of President. He Still Often Seems to Be Impersonating a Commander in Chief
Byline: Jonathan Alter Can George W. Bush be sold like Ronald Reagan? Within weeks, the president will begin the biggest political advertising campaign in history, unloading more than $150 million in TV ads in a dozen swing states over six months....
Target Disney; How Did an American Icon like Mickey Fall Prey to a Drab Cable Operator like Comcast? It's an Intricate Tale of Bleeding-Edge Technology, Big Personalities-And Hunger for Power
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts and David J. Jefferson, With Jennifer Ordonez It was supposed to be Michael Eisner's week, a time to beat back the critics who'd been hammering away at him and his company's performance. Last Monday Disney took out full-page...
The Cartel We Love to Hate; Americans Despise OPEC as a Conspiracy against Cheap Gas. but We May Have a Common Interest in Stable-Not Low-Energy Prices
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We ought to reconsider OPEC (the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries). For years, we've imagined it as a monstrous conspiracy designed to gouge oil-consuming countries and, in particular, to deprive Americans...
The Dope on Doping; Making the Case against Performance-Boosting Drugs
Byline: Mark Starr, With Mark Hosenball When president Bush unexpectedly devoted a chunk of his January State of the Union address to railing against performance-enhancing drugs in sports, it seemed to many like an oddball detour from the terror-focused...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Here's one of many harsh things about running for president: it forces candidates to answer for all sorts of decisions they made before they had any idea they'd be campaigning for the nation's highest office. When George W....
Travel: When East Joins West
Byline: Michelle Jana Chan Eastern Europe has never attracted as many tourists as the West. But that could change after May 1, when eight former Soviet-bloc countries join the European Union. When is the best time to go? TIP SHEET rates the capitals...
Undercover Operator; in New York, Where Gossip Is King, a Savvy Wall Street Mogul Pulls off a Top-Secret Publishing Deal. Again
Byline: Peg Tyre Call him the stealth deal-maker. In December, famed Wall Street financier Bruce Wasserstein upended the very public ambitions of some of New York's biggest media players with a silent and successful bid to buy New York Magazine....
'Vegetating in Solitude'; No WMD? One Jailed Iraqi Scientist Is Not a Bit Surprised
Byline: Joshua Hammer, With Mark Hosenball in Washington In the run-up to the Iraq war, Gen. Amer al-Saadi was the ubiquitous voice and face of Iraq's scientific establishment. An urbane, white-haired figure who spoke impeccable English, he famously...
War Stories; PAST AS PROLOGUE: Iraq Fills the Headlines, but for President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry, Vietnam May Be the Crucible That Matters More. How Two Sons of Privilege Confronted the Conflict-And the Ways Those Choices Have Colored Their Divergent Paths
Byline: Evan Thomas, With Michael Isikoff, Martha Brant, Mark Hosenball, T. Trent Gegax, Richard Wolffe, Susannah Meadows, Daniel McGinn and Jason McLure John Kerry did not have to think all that hard about joining the military and going to Vietnam....
When the Son Calls the Shots; the Former CEO of General Motors Now Helps His Son Run an Upscale Market on Cape Cod. They Both Had a Lot to Learn
Byline: Daniel McGinn Brian Smith was tired of the potato-chip business. It was 1999, and Smith, a marketing executive with Frito-Lay, dreamed of opening a small retail shop and being his own boss. So when he discovered a supermarket for sale on...