Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 17

Abu Ghraib and beyond; the Bush Administration Says the U.S. Atrocities at Saddam's Old Jail Were the Work of a Few. but Prisoner Abuse Is More Widespread, and Lots of People Are Passing the Buck. A NEWSWEEK Investigation
Byline: John Barry, Mark Hosenball and Babak Dehghanpisheh, With Melinda Liu in Baghdad, Michael Hirsh, Pat Wingert, Roy Gutman and T. Trent Gegax in Washington, Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai in Afghanistan and Christopher Dickey in Paris Abu Ghraib...
A Dream Deferred; Fifty Years Ago, a Landmark Ruling Seemed to Break Jim Crow's Back and Usher in an Era of Hope for Integrated Education. but the Reality Has Fallen Short of the Promise. the Fight for Decent Schooling for Black Kids Goes On
Byline: Ellis Cose Sometimes history serves as a magnifying mirror--making momentous what actually was not. But Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, is the real thing: a Supreme Court decision that fundamentally and forever changed...
An American Connection; It Was Just a Fingerprint on a Bag in Madrid. but the Latest Clue in the Probe of Spain's 9/11 Led the Feds to a Lawyer in Portland. Tracing Terror's Tricky Arc
Byline: Michael Isikoff, With Andrew Murr in Portland, Ore. Hours after four railway bombs exploded in Madrid on March 11, killing 191 people, Spanish investigators got a big break. Early that morning, witnesses had seen three men in ski masks exiting...
An Apology to the Graduates; You All Will Live Longer Than Any Generation in History, Yet You Were Kicked into High Gear Earlier as Well. How Exhausted You Must Be
Byline: Anna Quindlen Members of the class of 2004: I'm so sorry. I look at all of you and realize that, for many, life has been a relentless treadmill since you entered preschool at the age of 2. Sometimes, as though I am narrating a fairy...
A Rising Tide, Rocking Boats; the Politics of Gay Marriage Roil Oregon's Electoral Terrain
Byline: Karen Breslau, With Debra Rosenberg in Washington Most Oregon voters have never heard of Rives Kistler. Unless they are legal junkies, they know little about the impressive resume of the justice who sits on the Oregon Supreme Court, who...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn If you buy mutual funds from stockbrokers, you might have paid a sales charge you didn't owe. This happens when you're switching from one fund family to another. Most investors don't have a clue that some charges don't...
Esprit Redux; Fueled by Strong Growth in Europe, the Once Ubiquitous Brand Prepares for a U.S. Comeback
Byline: Anna Kuchment, With Stefan Theil in Berlin If you want insight into the business strategy of the reinvented Esprit brand, just pick up a copy of "Trading Up," a popular business book last year about the buying patterns of affluent American...
Eternal Life for Frosty; A New Hampshire Start-Up Wants to Keep the Ski Slopes White throughout the Year, and Even Make Snow for Events at Shopping Malls and Amusement Parks
Byline: Daniel McGinn For skiers, spring is the cruelest time of year. The mercury is rising, and most resorts have shut their lifts weeks ago. By Memorial Day, only a handful of high-altitude ski areas (like Colorado's Arapahoe Basin) will remain...
Going from Big-City Girl to Military Wife; Life on Base Is Almost Idyllic, except Those Soldiers in the Grocery Store May Soon Be Headed off to War
Byline: Gina Chon, Chon is a journalist. The rows of neatly parked Abrams battle tanks have become a familiar sight, but I still can't help staring at them every time I drive to the library or the gym. I've gotten used to the guarded entrance to...
Good News for Reptiles
Byline: Linda Stern Ask Gordon Vadis how business is and he'll tell you, of course, "It's "hopping." His firm, the Bug Company of Ham Lake, Minn., ships roughly 2.5 million crickets a week to pet stores, which sell them as bait and as food for lizards....
Grecian Formula; Brad Pitt Tackles Homer in the Blood-and-Biceps Epic 'Troy.' and You Thought Helen Was Hot
Byline: Jeff Giles, NEWSWEEK'S film critic David Ansen is on sabbatical. Brad Pitt's quest for credibility has been only a qualified success, so his first scene in Wolfgang Petersen's epic "Troy" is not just the movie's most titillating--he is revealed...
Inside Intel; CEO Craig Barrett Had a Rocky Start, Succeeding the Legendary Andy Grove. but Smart Bets during the Downturn Have Left the Company in Great Shape to Remain the Leader in Microchip Technology
Byline: Brad Stone The water-rocket demonstration last month at the SMK Padang Tembak high school in Kuala Lumpur combined three of Craig Barrett's passions: science, technology and education. The students were using the Web to learn how to launch...
In Their Pocket; All the Reforms That Are Supposed to Rein in Executive Pay and Clean Up the Mutual-Fund Mess Are Falling Short. Time for Some Oversight That's Truly Independent
Byline: Allan Sloan, <I>Sloan is NEWSWEEK's Wall Street editor. His e-mail is sloan@panix.com.</I> This is the season of big green, and not only for lawns. Chief executives are disclosing their pay packages, and mutual-fund companies...
Mack the Knife vs. Geek Chic; in the Bush-Kerry Ad War, Mediums Are the Message
Byline: Richard Wolffe, With Tamara Lipper and T. Trent Gegax, Graphic Text By Weston Kosova and Meredith Sadin, Graphic Research By Sarah Childress and Brian Braiker In the red corner is the ex- songwriter from Austin, Texas, backed by the talent...
'Make It Hell'
By late last week, seven enlisted men and women, all reservists, were facing a variety of military charges, including assault and committing "indecent acts," conspiracy and dereliction of duty. Some are still in Iraq; others have been reassigned to...
Newsmakers
Byline: Jac Chebatoris Q&A: KATE HUDSON Effervescent new mom Kate Hudson plays, well, the effervescent new mom to three orphaned kids in "Raising Helen," which opens at the end of the month. She talked to NEWSWEEK's Jac Chebatoris from New...
No Good Defense; He Leaned Forward, Changing the Way America Fights Wars and Shaking Up a Staid Bureaucracy. but His Culture of Intimidation Alienated the Brass-And Helped Pave the Road to Abu Ghraib. Donald Rumsfeld's Journey to the Brink
Byline: Evan Thomas, With John Barry, Daniel Klaidman, Mark Hosenball, Tamara Lipper, Michael Isikoff, Richard Wolffe, Roy Gutman and Pat Wingert Donald Rumsfeld likes to be in total control. He wants to know all the details, including the precise...
Nuclear Weapons: Saddam and the Scam Artists
Byline: Mark Hosenball Vice President Dick Cheney once famously declared, shortly before the outbreak of war, that Saddam Hussein had, "in fact, reconstituted nuclear weapons." When no such weapons turned up, administration officials said that what...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: New York Times (3), The Hill, Associated Press, The Washington Post, The Hill, Reuters, CNN, The Mirror, Reuters "I feel terrible... They're human beings." Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, apologizing...
Playing It Safe; Two Big Cities Are Hosting the Political Conventions. Will Tightened Security Create Buyers' Remorse?
Byline: Ron Depasquale Even in a town that's legendary for politics, it was a lobbying campaign for the ages. Soon after the 2000 presidential election, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino began talking up his city's bid to host the 2004 Democratic National...
Questions of Justice; the Abu Ghraib Abuses Are Part of a Deeper Crisis
Byline: Melinda Liu and Babak Dehghanpisheh, With bureau reports One by one, the reasons for sending America to war in Iraq seem to have crumbled. Investigators found no weapons of mass destruction and no proof of claims that Saddam Hussein was...
Rock's Big Bounce; in the 10 Years since Kurt Cobain Died, a Once Thrilling Genre Has Struggled. Now a New Community of Bands Is Emerging and Finally Making It Safe to Go Back into the Mosh Pit
Byline: Devin Gordon, With Bret Begun, Jac Chebatoris and Jennifer Ordonez Have you ever been outside in 106-degree heat? The air is crushing. You dehydrate instantly. You fantasize about cooler places, like Arizona. In 106-degree heat, the average...
Still Standing, Pat; from Computer World to Scorpion Dinners, IDG's McGovern Keeps His Eye on Information Everywhere
Byline: Steven Levy No surprise that Pat Mcgovern is big on brains. He's CEO of IDG, a privately held business launched back in 1964 that rakes in $2.4 billion a year from selling head food: more than 300 computer magazines (Computer World and Linux...
Street Fighting Man; Regulators Want Dick Grasso to Give Up a Chunk of His Controversial $139.5 Million Payday. but the Former Big Board Chief Says He Isn't Budging. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: Charles Gasparino Dick Grasso had steered clear of the New York Stock Exchange for more than six months. After all, it's the scene of what he calls his "execution" last September, when he was fired from his post running the exchange after...
Television: Tax Trouble for ABC's 'Extreme' Winners?
Byline: Daniel McGinn Last fall Trent Woslum, a National Guardsman who was deployed in Iraq, got an e-mail from his wife. She'd been contacted by a new TV show called "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," which wanted to do a big renovation of their...
Theater: 'A Big Bra to Fill'
Byline: Marc Peyser Actors never think twice about losing weight for a role. It was a little harder for Michael McKean to lose his eyebrows. "I look a little like Boris Karloff getting made up for 'Frankenstein'," McKean says. Alas, his bristly...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker If you've been reading this magazine for the past few years, you know what that figure to your right is. It's the Alexander Calder sculpture of an elephant that is given out to winners of the National Magazine Awards, the Oscars...
The Google Supercomputer
Byline: Steven Levy How many computers does Google have? The answer may interest you if you're considering a bid in the upcoming Dutch auction for shares in the firm's recently announced IPO. One way to view to the processing power of the search...
The Picture the World Sees; Officials Are Paid to Make Decisions on Right and Wrong, Not on the Punch of Pictures-Or on How Things Might Look If They Came Out
Byline: Jonathan Alter A few years ago, I traveled to Vietnam. Without intending to do so, I found myself visiting the scenes of iconic photographs I remembered seeing when I was a kid: the Saigon street corner where Eddie Adams took the shot of...
The Price of Arrogance; in a War That Could Go on for Decades, You Cannot Simply Detain People Indefinitely on the Sole Authority of the Secretary of Defense
Byline: Fareed Zakaria America is ushering in a new responsibility era," says President Bush as part of his standard stump speech, "where each of us understands we're responsible for the decisions we make in life." When speaking about bad CEOs he's...
The Price of Democracy; It Costs Us $100 Billion or More to Do Our Taxes, Because the System Is So Complex. the Trouble Is That Both Political Parties like It That Way
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Eugene Steuerle is one of Washington's ranking policy wonks--a term used here with respect. He's forgotten more about taxes in the last 15 seconds than most of us will ever know. He arrived in Washington in 1974, worked...
The Royal Treatment; Air Travelers Are Getting a Lot More for Their Money. Business-Class Now Looks like Yesterday's First Class. That's Great for Executives. It May Not Be for the Industry
Byline: Rana Foroohar Business-class travel used to mean some nice extras--a bigger seat, more entertainment choices and maybe a better meal. But these days, corporate travelers can increasingly expect five-star service in the skies. In Virgin Atlantic's...
Time for Tea; It's the Brand of 'Zentrepreneurs.' the Republic of Tea Mixes Spiritual Advice with a Good, Expensive Product
Byline: Jennifer Barrett The Republic of Tea doesn't advertise. But it has found a clever way to get the word out about its products. In 2001, chairman Ron Rubin and COO Stuart Avery Gold wrote "Success @ Life: How to Catch and Live Your Dream,"...
Tip Sheet
Byline: Sandy Lawrence Edry, Linda Stern, Elise Soukup, Brian Braiker TECHNOLOGY How I Spent My Vacation By Sandy Lawrence Edry With summer-vacation season rapidly approaching, the time might be ripe to finally ditch your old clunky camera...
Travel: Going South for Summer
Byline: Linda Stern Larry Fischel and Lorrie Gilbert of Takoma Park, Md., have vacationed in Europe more than a dozen times. This summer, they decided to bag the Continent and take their two daughters to Costa Rica. Why? For starters, each round-trip...