Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 7

A Legend's Soul Is Rested; 'I Try to Keep Hope Alive, but That's Not Always the Easiest Thing to Do,' Parks Wrote
***** CORRECTION: In 'A Legend's Soul is Rested' (Nov. 7), a caption accompanying a mug shot of Rosa Parks was erroneously dated 1955. The photo was taken in 1956. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Ellis Cose CORRECTION APPENDED...
A Light in the Piazza; Once Outrageous Architect Renzo Piano Now Shows a Quiet Elegance. Did He Lose His Edge-Or Find His Soul?
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan It's easy to forget that the elegant Italian architect Renzo Piano's first big commission was totally outrageous. Thirty-five years ago, he and British colleague Richard Rogers teamed up to build the Pompidou Center--both...
A Man and His Myths; the Creator of Narnia Was a Scholar, a Drinker-And a Believer
Byline: Lisa Miller (With Ben Whitford) In 1949, the year he finished writing "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," C. S. Lewis was leading at least four different lives. His reputation as a Christian apologist had already been launched with several...
A Misfit-And a Master; A New Show by the All-American Loner Andrew Wyeth
Byline: Peter Plagens The great--yes, great-- American painter Andrew Wyeth just doesn't fit in. The Museum of Modern Art hangs "Christina's World"--its most popular picture--in a little hallway away from the canonical modernists. Critics lump him...
A New Money Man; Ben Bernanke Has a Tough Act to Follow as Fed Chairman
Byline: Daniel McGinn and Richard Wolffe (With Holly Bailey) When Ben Bernanke left his post at the Federal Reserve last spring to become President George W. Bush's top economic adviser, his work pals didn't give him much of a send-off. Only a month...
A Pope of Quiet Surprises; How Benedict Has Proved to Be More Complex and Charismatic Than Many Expected
Byline: George Weigel (Weigel, a senior fellow of Washington's Ethics and Public Policy Center, is the author of "God's Choice: Pope Benedict XVI and the Future of the Catholic Church," published on Nov. 1 by HarperCollins.) When the newly elected...
A Smile So Bright You Gotta Wear Shades; When Even the Dental Hygienist Thought I'd Gone Too Far, I Started to Panic. Next Stop, Mexico?
Byline: Kathleen Clary Miller (Miller lives in San Juan Capistrano, Calif.) I am a recovering teeth whitener. As with most addictions, this one began innocently enough. A few years ago I asked my dentist a casual question: "By the way, how much...
Better Luck Next Time; What Went Wrong: Harriet Miers Was Asked to Be Candidate and Campaign Manager. Lessons Learned from a Failed Supreme Court Pick
Byline: Richard Wolffe (With Daniel Klaidman, Holly Bailey, Jonathan Darman and Stuart Taylor Jr.) The news only worsened as the day wore on. After a series of private soundings and informal head counts in the Senate, it was clear to Harriet Miers...
Cheney's Cheney; Right Hand: He Was on a Mission to Protect the Country from Harm-And Detonate Critics in His Path. Scooter Libby's Ways and Means
Byline: Evan Thomas (With Michael Isikoff, Mark Hosenball, Daniel Klaidman and Steve Tuttle in Washington and Jessica Silver-Greenberg in New Haven Graphic by Andrew Romano and Karl Gude) The vice president and his chief aide often shared bits of...
'Eleven Men and Sic 'Em'; after Bear Bryant Became a Coach, Many Players Became Dangerously Large Specialists, Dangerous to Others-And Themselves
Byline: George F. Will On Jan. 26, 1983, phone service through-out area code 205, which then included all of Alabama, crashed from overload. Was the cause a natural disaster? Yes. Oh, yes, something very natural--death--had claimed the University...
'Failure Is Not an Option'; Washington's Envoy to Iraq Speaks out about the New Constitution, and His Strategy for Containing the Insurgency
Byline: Michael Hirsh Zalmay Khalilzad has been America's troubleshooter on the most important challenges facing the country. He recently finished a stint as the U.S. envoy to Afghanistan, and now he's ambassador to Iraq. He spoke last week to NEWSWEEK's...
Flying Blind; Dark Days: Singed by the Special Prosecutor and Rattled by the Harriet Miers Mess, Team Bush Is in Turmoil
Byline: Howard Fineman and Richard Wolffe (With Holly Bailey) The mood in the White House last Friday afternoon was grim, but eerily quiet. Dick Cheney was gone, off in Georgia giving yet another apocalyptic terrorism speech to yet another military...
Grading 529s: Not All Get a's; Some 529 Plans Burden You with Poor Performers and High Fees. Part of the Industry Is Shot Full of Sales Abuse. Still, There Are Some Plans I Love
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Parents and grandparents are pouring money into the college-savings plans known as 529s--more than $55 billion to date. What drives them is the tax advantage. As long as you use the...
Grapes of Power and Frustration; South African Blacks Get into the Wine-Making Biz
Byline: Joshua Hammer Cecil Jaap's field of dreams begins just outside of Stellenbosch, in South Africa's wine-producing heartland. A former grape picker and wine taster who retired three years ago, Jaap, 58, had chafed for decades at the lack of...
History: The Five-Year Itch; Second Terms Are Often Tough for Our Presidents. but Today's Dark Clouds Don't Always Dictate Tomorrow's Legacy
Byline: Michael Beschloss (Beschloss is the author, most recently, of 'The Conquerors.') In the fall of 1937, less than a year after winning re-election by the greatest popular landslide in history, Franklin Roosevelt was suffering from a second-term...
Journalist, Jazzman, Gentleman; A Collector of Friends, Thomas Wootton Masland: 1950-2005
Byline: Rod Nordland When our colleague Tom Masland stepped off the curb onto West End Avenue one rainy night last week, he had his funky little black bag over his left shoulder and his saxophone in a case in his right hand. His life was about to...
Karl Rove: Last-Minute Evidence
Byline: Michael Isikoff Special counsel Patrick Fitzgerald's decision not to indict deputy White House chief of staff Karl Rove in the CIA leak case followed a flurry of last-minute negotiations between the prosecutor and Rove's defense lawyer,...
Lebanon: Sniffing out Assassins; the Murder of Rafik Hariri Has Gotten All the Attention. but There Are Other Killings, and Another Investigator Is on the Case
Byline: Kevin Peraino (With Christopher Dickey in Paris) Samir Kassir slouched in his chair and glanced out the window of his office above Martyr's Square in Beirut. A month earlier, the vast plaza was choked with almost a million flag-waving demonstrators...
Liposuction: Going Micro
Byline: Karen Springen Brandy Montoya, 28, eats healthy and visits the gym at least three times a week. But as hard as she tried, she could not get the bottom half of her body to match her smaller torso. So in July, she signed up for $9,000 worth...
Love Me, Love My Hogs; Lonely Farmers Seek Potential Mates on the Internet
Byline: Dirk Johnson John Price is six feet tall and ruggedly handsome. With a quick wit and successful career, the 35-year-old bachelor would be a prize on the urban dating circuit. But when it comes to romance, he's missing in action. On his job--tending...
Medicine: The Future Arrives Early
Byline: Mary Carmichael and Claudia Kalb In science, revolutions almost always take longer than their instigators expect--we're still waiting for our flying cars--so when National Institutes of Health director Dr. Elias Zerhouni says that "over...
Meeting the Family; Interview: The Narnia Kids Up Close
Byline: Jeff Giles The Pevensie children couldn't have been better cast. William Moseley plays Peter, who must lead an army. Anna Popplewell plays cautious Susan. Skandar Keynes is devious Edmund. And Georgie Henley is openhearted little Lucy. On...
News as a Contact Sport; Sean McManus, the New Honcho of CBS News, Has Joined a Business in the Throes of Dizzying Change
***** CORRECTION: The initial version of this report referred to 'the late' sportscasting icon Jim McKay. At 84 years old, McKay has laid his sportscasting days to rest. But he remains very much alive, residing near Baltimore. NEWSWEEK apologizes...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Devin Gordon Q&A: Zach Braff Zach Braff is expanding his thespian chops (and learning some barnyard epithets?) by voicing the title character in the animated "Chicken Little." He spoke to NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. ...
Next Stop Narnia; C. S. Lewis's Classic Fantasy Novels Finally Hit the Screen. Can the Franchise Soar? an Exclusive First Look at 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.'
Byline: Jeff Giles OK, action!" says the director. "You think you've found a good hiding place, Georgie. You're feeling for the back of the wardrobe." It's October 2004 on the set of "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe"...
No Kitchen, Water Views; as More People Call Marinas Home, the Landlubbers Who Live Nearby Worry about Property Values-And Empty Beer Cans
Byline: William Lee Adams When Justin Omps, 28, moved aboard the Tycho Brahe last September, he transformed the timeworn tugboat into a floating frat house. Docked on the Potomac River at Washington, D.C.'s Gangplank Marina, Omps's 60-foot boat...
Oil-for-Food: Where the Money Went
Byline: Mark Hosenball Intriguing evidence in the U.N. Oil-for-Food scandal shows Saddam Hussein's regime used U.N.-sanctioned oil deals to finance foreign sympathizers. A final report by a U.N. inquiry headed by former U.S. Federal Reserve chief...
Opinion: Reality Check on the Fed; the Nation's Central Bank Hates Inflation, except the Kind That's Puffed Up Its Reputation as an All-Powerful Agency
Byline: Allan Sloan We all like to believe that there's an all-knowing, all-powerful force looking after us. No, I'm not talking about organized religion and God. I'm talking about the widespread belief that an all-powerful Federal Reserve Board...
Our 'Can't We All Just Get Along?' Awards
Byline: Steven Levy Who doesn't love DVDs? They are cheap, ubiquitous and do their job well. One reason for their instant success is that--unlike the initial situation with videocassette tapes--you never have to worry about whether you're buying...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: The Washington Post, Associated Press, Editor & Publisher, New York Times, The Washington Post, ESPN, Associated Press, Newsday, ESPN "They brought this on themselves." Virginia Rep. Tom Davis, a Republican,...
Sweetness and Fight; Sugar and Its Substitutes Take on the Reigning Champ
Byline: Claudia Kalb and Anne Underwood (With Vanessa Juarez) One recent fall day, 11 celebrity chefs gathered at New York's French Culinary Institute to show off their latest concoctions. The delicacies ranged from stir-fried veggies and candied-ginger...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker To understand how Washington really works, you have be more than just a reporter. You have to be part historian, part political scientist and part amateur psychologist. Evan Thomas is all those things (as well as one of the...
The Press: A Mighty Shield; the Fitzgerald Probe Laid Bare the Reporter-Source Relationship. Why Smarter Protection Is Needed
Byline: Ellis Cose For all the fuss made by The New York Times, it's less than clear that a federal shield law would have kept reporter Judith Miller out of jail. Patrick Fitzgerald apparently doubts it would have. In his press conference Friday,...
The Price of Loyalty; the Consequences of a Bias for Loyalty over Debate Have Been Devastating. Issues Don't Get Aired; Downside Risks Remain Unassessed
Byline: Jonathan Alter The posthumous purple heart rested near the folded American flag on the modest dining-room table of his parents' home in Cleveland. Edward (Augie) Schroeder, a Boy Scout turned Marine, was killed along with 13 other soldiers...
Truth about Torture; A Courageous Soldier and a Determined Senator Demand Clear Standards
Byline: Michael Hirsh Army Capt. Ian Fishback is plainly a very brave man. Crazy brave, even. Not only has the 26-year-old West Pointer done a tour in Iraq and one in Afghanistan, he has had the guts to suggest publicly that his boss, Donald Rumsfeld,...
Why Rockstar Is the Leader of the Pack; the Videogame King Keeps the Hits Coming
Byline: N'Gai Croal Videogame creators firmly believe that their work will someday become the dominant form of entertainment in the 21st century. So why isn't their message as original as their medium? The vast majority of story-oriented games shamelessly...