Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 14, October 1

Al Qaeda's Feuds and Fears
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau Lonely, marginalized and suddenly suspicious that he was losing his grip over the organization he helped create, Osama bin Laden finally decided that enough was enough. At least that's the explanation sources...
A Nuclear 'Litmus Test'
Byline: Christopher Dickey IAEA chief Mohamed ElBaradei says Iran is not a 'clear and present danger.' But his patience is limited. As rumors of war gather around Iran, the United Nations' International Atomic Energy Agency and its director general,...
A Photographic Vision
Byline: Jeff Housenbold; Housenbold Is The Ceo Of Shutterfly. Shutterfly was a survivor of the dotcom crash. Now it's a leader in online photographic services and a trusted brand. The CEO explains how he did it. Facing adversity at a young age...
A Plushy Plague?
Byline: Anna Kuchment This company's stuffed toys: Ebola, mad cow, flu and the Black Death Drew Oliver hit upon his big idea after reading a memoir by scientist Richard Feynman. In "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" the author describes his...
A Reward for Good Behavior
Byline: Emily Flynn Vencat A billionaire wants to give $5 million to African leaders who rule responsibly. Mo Ibrahim's ideas have been labeled wacky before. A decade ago, when even American consumers were just getting used to cell phones, he...
A Vegas Crew, but It Ain't Ocean's 11
Byline: Andrew Murr and Suzanne Smalley No one focuses on his good qualities, but say this much for O. J. Simpson: the disgraced football star still knows how to pull a team together. In Las Vegas for a pal's wedding -- he was going to be the best...
A Year of Selling Books
Byline: Jennie Yabroff A rash of memoirs by people spending 12 months following rules shows self-deprivation is strangely hip. There are lots of rules in the Bible. A. J. Jacobs decided to abide by them all. He followed the Ten Commandments....
Beliefwatch: Profane
Byline: Lisa Miller Some stories are best told straight. On Sept. 8, Kathy Griffin, a bawdy, foulmouthed comedian, accepted an Emmy Award for her reality show, "My Life on the D-List," and in her acceptance speech she explained that while other...
Blackwater Down
Byline: Larry Kaplow And Michael Hirsh; With Kevin Peraino In Baghdad A noonday shoot-out in Baghdad prompts angry calls for Western security contractors to be reined in. Hassan Jabir Al-Mayahi was in a hurry. The Iraqi lawyer had a date at appeals...
Bonds Ball: Bang Zoom to the Moon?
Byline: Mark Starr After buying Barry Bonds's record-setting 756th home-run ball for $752,467, hip-hop fashion mogul Marc Ecko wants you to decide its fate. On vote756.com, he offers three choices: send it to the Hall of Fame, brand it with an asterisk...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Linda Stern Maybe it's time your kids started pulling their weight. With tough new kiddie tax rules, it doesn't pay to feed their savings accounts: the interest they earn is taxed at your rate until they're 18, and next year that goes up...
Caribbean Hold 'Em
Byline: Emily Flynn Vencat Antigua vs. the U.S. in an online gaming dispute Antigua is better known for beaches than trade disputes. But next month this tiny Caribbean resort could begin using a World Trade Organization ruling to compel the United...
Cool, Clear Water
Byline: Christian Caryl; With Sudip Mazumdar In Rajasthan The forgotten virtues of Chinese foot pumps, buried aqueducts and other ancient water-supply technologies The people of Qara had written off their town's buried assets. More than 1,500...
Freegan Ride
Byline: Raina Kelley Are freegans oddballs or sages? NEWSWEEK's Raina Kelley spent a month living as one to find out. Before June of this year, I thought only the sad and desperate ate garbage. Then I discovered the freegans. For those new to...
Friendly Skies
Byline: Daniel McGinn You think your little corporate jet's impressive? Step aboard a private Boeing 767 or new Airbus 380 designed just for you. Fly right! For business travelers, the last few months have been the summer from hell -- a time...
Give One, Get One
Byline: Steven Levy The $100 (well, $200) laptop is ready to change the world, if people will buy it for the kids who need it. Walter Bender, the software chief of One Laptop Per Child -- the much-ballyhooed, as-yet unproven project to deliver...
In 'Dark Energy,' Cosmic Humility
Byline: Sharon Begley To the ancients, exploding stars were bad news. To astronomer Adam Riess, poring over data from a telescope in Chile, it looked like supernovas were still cursed. He and his colleagues were measuring the brightness and distance...
It's Not 'Star Wars'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Robert Hefner says natural gas offers a bridge to a squeaky-clean 'hydrogen economy.' Before Robert A. Hefner III came along, many people assumed natural gas was limited in its quantity and uses. But since its founding...
Killing the Consumer
Byline: Anna Quindlen Since lung cancer has outstripped breast cancer as a killer of women, younger smokers have to be constantly created to fill the death gap. In a world of uncertainty, there's always one group you can count on: the tobacco...
Let's Make an Oil Deal
Byline: Richard Wolffe And Gretel C. Kovach; With Larry Kaplow A Bush family friend may be undermining Iraqi peace. Ray Hunt isn't your typical Texas tycoon. Unlike other billionaire oilmen who hype their legends in the press, Hunt tries hard...
Me and Igi and the Fickle Finger of Fame
Byline: Chanan Tigay; TIGAY lives in San Francisco. As a struggling actor, I never got my big break. But one small role showed me the life of a true artist. THE AD IN BACK STAGE SOUGHT A young "Woody Allen type" to star in an independent film....
Mothers to Blame
Byline: Jennie Yabroff; With Kendall Hill In Australia Hysteria around moms suspected of murder can warp judgment and logic. Kate McCann rarely cries in public, even when talking about her missing daughter, Madeleine. McCann has been described...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: AFP, AP, Reuters, CNN, MSNBC, AP, New York Times, Politico, Boston Globe, AP "Evidently some innocent lives were lost." George W. Bush, on a violent clash involving private security contractor Blackwater USA that killed...
Pledging Even More Allegiance
Byline: Tony Dokoupil For the first time in two decades, the U.S. citizenship test has been revamped -- and the new version, which will be unveiled this week for use starting Oct. 1, 2008, will mark a profound shift in what it takes to become an...
Quick Read
Byline: John David Sparks Doing What Matters: How to Get Results That Make a Difference -- The Revolutionary Old-School Approach by James M. Kilts, John F. Manfredi and Robert L. Lorber Jim Kilts may not be a celebrity CEO, but he's something...
Riding in the Slipstream
Byline: Daniel Gross The Japanese are way ahead in manufacturing hybrid cars. The good news: American entrepreneurs are cashing in on side products like souped-up batteries. When it comes to hybrids, the heavyweight tussle between American and...
Saving the World Is
Byline: Bill Gates The evidence is in: we can stop diseases like malaria and TB from killing millions of people each year. Last year my wife, Melinda, and I visited an AIDS clinic in Durban, South Africa. We met women who had walked miles from...
Shanghai Softens Up
Byline: Duncan Hewitt And Melinda Liu A tough town undergoes a crash course in compassion. Shanghai is different from most Chinese cities. Even before the birth of the People's Republic in 1949, the Shanghainese were more Western, more worldly...
Speech Impediment
Byline: Lorraine Ali Lost in the recent firestorm over the nation's first bilingual Arab-English public school -- the Khalil Gibran International Academy in Brooklyn, N.Y., which opponents have argued will become a breeding ground for militant Islam...
The Bernanke Era Has Begun
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Last week the Fed shifted its emphasis from fighting inflation to preventing panic. Was that the right call? Certainly it was the popular call. It's Ben Bernanke's moment of truth. The Federal Reserve -- the economy's...
The Compromise of A Conservative
Byline: Jonathan Darman If all hope is lost, Gingrich could, at the very least, articulate the GOP party platform. It's hard to take Newt Gingrich seriously when he says he might run for president. In the nearly nine years since he resigned as...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham It did not take long. Only 4 months old, Jennifer Mansua has already been infected by the malaria parasite. Her mother, Cecilia Nakabu, brought her child to the Kintampo Health Research Centre in central Ghana, where Shaul Schwarz...
The Miracle Workers
Byline: Eve Conant For 25 years, evangelicals have voted Republican. But the Democrats are courting, and their efforts may have a prayer. Richard Land had never met one-on-one with a chairman of the Democratic National Committee. The Tennessee...
The Noble Scavenger on the Living-Room Couch
Byline: Jerry Adler; FROM FREEGAN.INFO There have been romantic rebels against civilization almost since it began. But civilization has a way of winning out. They claim to model themselves after the very earliest human cultures, bands of nomadic...
The Quiet Giant
Byline: Steven Levy Adobe's CEO on his brand, piracy and Microsoft When you think of software-application giants, you think Microsoft. For Web giants, it's Google or Amazon. But aside from so-called creative professionals, not many folks think...
The Search for Solutions
Byline: Mary Carmichael; With Scott Johnson In Kintampo, William Underhill In London And Sarah Kliff A doctor, a banker, an engineer and a scientist are working separately -- and together -- to bring lifesaving vaccines to children around the world....
The Whispers of War
A Secret Raid, Nuclear Ambitions and the Next Crisis Sam Gardiner plays war for a living. A former Air Force colonel who helped write contingency plans for the U.S. military, Gardiner has spent the 20 years since his retirement staging war-simulation...
This Is Your Brain on Sports
Byline: Mark Starr Coming out of the sunshine into the murky indoor light, Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger can't quite believe his eyes. "Cool. Crazy cool," he says, as he surveys a vast playground: a mini football field, basketball...
Torrents of Arabia
Byline: David Ansen 'The Kingdom' is full of action -- and full of itself. The prologue to "The Kingdom" bombards us with pro-vocative facts about Saudi Arabia, its vast oil resources, terrorism and the close links between the Saudi royal family...
Up and Coming: Casey Affleck
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh By Ramin Setoodeh It's been a while since anyone cared about an Affleck movie. But that'll change now that Casey, Ben's kid brother, is starring in two big films: "The Assassination of Jesse James" and "Gone Baby Gone"...
Who Should Pay for Health Benefits?
Byline: Keith Naughton; With Hilary Shenfeld Unions start shouldering the burden of medical costs. When Don Jones went to work on the tire line at Goodyear in 1970, he says the company promised him free health-care coverage for life. Those generous...