Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 22, November 26

A Catholic Dilemma: Can They Root for Rudy?
Byline: Lisa Miller And Jessica Ramirez; And Rudy Giuliani has a Catholic problem and it's not, strangely enough, that he was raised as a Roman Catholic, considered becoming a priest, then dumped his second of three wives on television and has been...
A Learning Disability
Byline: Dan Ephron; With Sarah Elkins In Washington Little is being done to give vets the educational opportunities their elders enjoyed. Charles Schelberg might never have gone to college were it not for a rush of government generosity more...
America the Unwelcoming
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The United States is the only major country in the world to which travel has declined amid a tourist boom. As an immigrant, I've always loved Thanksgiving for all the corniest reasons. It's a distinctly American holiday,...
Are the Kids Alright?
Byline: Sharon Begley New research questions whether early warning signs such as teen sex inevitably lead to problems. By the ripe old age of 8 weeks, your baby should smile (and not because of gas). By 5 months, she should hug and by 6 months,...
Baghdad Comes Alive
Byline: Rod Nordland; With Salih Mehdi And Hussam Ali In Baghdad For the first time in years, the Iraqi capital is showing signs of life. But the calm is all too fragile, and it's an opportunity the government cannot afford to miss. For someone...
Blessed Is the Full Plate
Byline: Anna Quindlen A terrible shortage of food for the poor grips the country. Where is the political will to do the right thing for the hungry? One of the most majestic dining rooms in New York City is in the Church of the Holy Apostles....
Bringing Good Design to the Ballot Box
Byline: Rolf Ebeling Our cultural marketplace is too crowded to get to everything, so tiny gems slip by unnoticed all the time. In this feature, our experts celebrate small things that they love -- and that deserve to be big. Graphics designers...
Brown Is the New Gold
Byline: Lorraine Ali He sings. He dances. He's in a new movie. Why an 18-year-old kid may be pop music's last great hope. Teens are hanging out the third-story windows of the Los Angeles Leadership Academy charter school waving frantically. If...
Can It Kindle the Imagination?
Byline: Steven Levy We read the fine print on Amazon's new gadget. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos says THAT the Kindle may be the most important thing he's ever done. But how well does it work? As the first journalist to get his hands on the device, I...
Condi's Southern Strategy
Byline: Michael Hirsh; With Kevin Peraino In Jerusalem The secretary of State draws on her personal history to push Israelis and Palestinians together. Condoleezza Rice knows something about the corrosive power of hopelessness. She saw a lot...
'Crunch' Time for the GOP
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson A slowing economy is already a burden that Republicans will carry into the election. A harsher credit 'crunch' could be fatal. Don't believe all the hype about the "credit crunch." Not yet, anyway. It's supposedly...
Dangerous Liaisons
Byline: Michael Isikoff, Mark Hosenball And Evan Thomas Nada Prouty worked for the FBI and CIA. Now there's worry she's not who they thought she was. She was just what the spooks were looking for. Nada Nadim Prouty was athletically fit and aggressive,...
Ending the Era of the Starchitect
Byline: Cathleen Mcguigan For the last decade, American museums have been on a building binge. The "Bilbao effect" -- the urgent desire to replicate the success of Frank Gehry's 1997 Guggenheim Museum in Spain -- sent museum bigwigs scurrying to...
Fine Dining in Sin City
Byline: Tara Weingarten In the first Michelin Guide covering Las Vegas restaurants, the only three-star establishment is Joel Robuchon's eponymous eatery at the MGM Grand, which reviewers called "perfection on a plate." It's currently one of 58...
Following His Green Dream
Byline: Tony Dokoupil And David A. Kaplan Al Gore just won a Nobel Prize for teaching the world to think green, but he's also showing he knows a thing or two about another kind of green: money. Since 2000, according to published reports, the former...
Holiday Gift Guide
Panicking about wedging another gift-giving season into your crammed schedule? Relax, we've got you covered with fun and funky presents for all your nearest and dearest. Happy Holidays. Silver Speedster: Tykes can go for the checkered flag with...
How to Beat Hillary (Next) November
Byline: Karl Rove; Rove, Former Senior Adviser And Deputy Chief Of Staff For President Bush, Is A Newsweek Contributor. Republicans who think she'll be easy to defeat are wrong. What they should do. I've seen up close the two Clintons America...
Interpol Raises the Stakes
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball; and With little fanfare, tension between Iran and the Bush administration escalated earlier this month when Interpol, the world police organization, voted to issue "red notices" for the arrest of three...
In Trouble for Show and Tell
Byline: Roya Wolverson For Demarcus Blackwell, having the "sex talk" with his 15-year-old son was "kind of embarrassing." But that was nothing compared with the idea of explaining sexual harassment to his preschooler. "He doesn't have the slightest...
I Was A Teenage Beauty Queen
Byline: Jennifer Trujillo; Trujillo Lives In Durango, Colo. My past used to be a source of shame. Out in the real world, I realized just how much it taught me. How much do you want for these?" The silver haired lady asked me. She held up two...
Make the Bush Record the Issue
Absent amnesia -- which only happens on soaps -- Democrats will be fine. Times are tough for the Republican Party and its candidates. Earlier this month, according to Gallup, more people strongly disapproved of George W. Bush than any previous president...
Maybe We Can Work It Out
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn; Reporter Associate: Temma EhrenfeldReporter Associate: If banks would modify the loan terms, the majority of at-risk borrowers could pay their mortgages and stay in their homes. Some 2.2 million homeowners face foreclosure,...
Nicole Kidman
Byline: Nicki Gostin Kidman, Yes. But Not a Kidder. Nicole Kidman plays a neurotic MOTHER in "Margot at the Wedding." She spoke to Nicki Gostin. You know this is a fun interview, not a meaning-of-life interview. I didn't. Good warning....
Perspectives
"The fact is, we can no longer sustain the military deployment in Iraq." House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, after the House approved a bill to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq by December 2008 "I had hoped that they had evolved beyond this." Columbia...
Princess Power
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh And Jennie Yabroff Your daughter has a royal crush. So do Barbie and Dora. If Disney has its way, women will become the next subjects kneeling before its $4 billion throne. What kind of woman would wear a buttercup yellow...
Rudy's Loyalty Problem
Byline: Jonathan Alter The posture of Rudy's inner circle (made up of the Yes-Rudys) is 'to hell with the critics! He's our guy!' DANIEL AGUILAR -- REUTERS-CORBIS NO RETREAT: Kerik (right) has Giuliani's support It was the mid-1990s, and...
The Blue-Chip Checkup
Byline: Mary Carmichael For a basic fee of $1,400, the Presidential Physical makes each patient feel like the leader of the free world. Daniel Khani was feeling healthy, but he did have a medical problem or, rather, a problem with medicine: he...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham The first book I can remember holding -- holding, not reading -- was a copy of "Treasure Island," which had been inscribed to me by an overly enthusiastic grandfather on the occasion of my turning a month old. I still have it,...
The Future of Reading
Byline: Steven Levy Amazon's Jeff Bezos already built a better bookstore. Now he believes he can improve upon one of humankind's most divine creations: the book itself. Technology," computer pioneer Alan Kay once said, "is anything that was invented...
The Roles They Are A-Changin'
Byline: David Gates In Todd Haynes's film, one Dylan's not enough. "I'm not there," Todd Haynes's oblique, fragmented fictional portrait of Bob Dylan, presents him as a handful of alter egos, none of whom is called Bob Dylan. They often speak...
The Wrath of John
Byline: Holly Bailey; With Eleanor Clift, Richard Wolffe And Arian Campo-Flores Trailing his rivals, Edwards has injected urgency into his bid. There are some things about John Edwards that haven't changed in the four years since he last ran...
To Shoot for the Stars
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Astronomer Heidi Hammel keeps her eyes on the skies, where the universe is always full of surprises. Astronomer Heidi B. Hammel, 47, studies outer planets (right now, she's focusing on Uranus). She's also helping to...
Trouble on the Takeoff
Byline: John Barry; John Barry Shortly after 9/11, the White House decided that the president needed a new helicopter. The current Marine One fleet was more than 30 years old and needed upgrades to its in-flight protection and communications gear....
You Can Go Home Again
Byline: Carol E. Lee And Evan Thomas Prosecutors said he helped with mob hits, then their case unraveled. Now this G-man's hitting the beach. For Roy Lindley Devecchio, life was back to normal. The silver-haired grandfather and his wife, Carolyn,...