Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 19, November 8

Addicted to a Run?
Byline: Steve Tuttle; With Ian Yarett in New York Dave Brewer likes to run. He ran yesterday. If he's alive and not in traction, he ran today. He ran every day last month, and every day last year, too, and on April 16, 2011, he will celebrate one...
Back to the 'Bagman'
Byline: Jonathan Alter With all the secret cash flowing into politics, we're returning to the days when powerful interests could buy influence without any way to trace it. Let's be honest: all the talk about money in politics is tiresome. DNC,...
Class Action
Byline: Sehba Ali The idea of extending the school day--and year--is gaining momentum. (Sorry, kids.) Twelve years ago, as a first-year language-arts teacher at a middle school in Houston, I had 50 minutes a day with each of my classes. That...
DSK vs. Sarko
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Tracy Mcnicoll Dominique Strauss-Kahn has been tasked with saving the global economy and been given billions to do so. But the IMF chief may be eyeing a new job. Dominique Strauss-Kahn is on top of the world right...
High-Speed Pork
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Why fast trains are a waste of money. Somehow, it has become fashionable to think that high-speed trains connecting major cities will help "save the planet." They won't. They're a perfect example of wasteful spending...
Holding Dollars Hostage
Byline: Daniel Gross Big companies stash cash abroad. I recently heard the CEO of a large, publicly held multinational company complain that high corporate taxes were a significant impediment to job creation. The U.S. imposes taxes of 35 percent...
India a Delicate Dance
Byline: John Barry The agenda for President Obama's trip to India this week will be far weightier than it might appear. Most of his three-day visit will be devoted to ceremonial tourism and talks to business groups. There will be an address to Parliament...
More Money, More Problems
Byline: Ezra Klein The soul-crushing life of a senator. The 2010 election cost more than $4 billion--a staggering sum. It's large enough that some of my colleagues, like Daniel Gross, have wondered if, in a weak economy, we shouldn't have elections...
Newsweek's Power 50
2 - Glenn Beck $33 million Host, 'The Glenn Beck Program' (syndicated radio) and 'Glenn Beck' (fox news) The early-morning regional radio host, who once struggled with alcohol and drug abuse, found his passions in politics and Mormonism. Left...
NEWSWEEK's Power 50
Byline: Matthew Miller and Andrew Romano In the hypercommodified media culture of 2010, the most influential political figures are the ones who make the most money. After leaving the White House, Gerald Ford never received $100,000 for a single...
Reagan or Gingrich?
Byline: Jacob Weisberg The coming GOP House leadership. In the likely event that Republicans capture control of one or both houses of Congress this week, the new leaders will face a strategic question. Should they pursue the agenda of the Tea...
Sacks of Cash
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau Tehran's influence buyers are on a shopping spree in Kabul. The New York Times only scratched the surface in last week's report that Iranian officials have delivered bags of cash worth millions of dollars to...
She Is Janet. Hear Her Roar
Byline: Allison Samuels Why do men always try to protect Michael's little sister? With a new movie, look, and perspective on life after a painful year, Miss Jackson is serving notice: she can handle her own bruise control. Maybe it's the big...
Sins of the Grandfathers
Byline: Sharon Begley What happens in Vegas could affect your offspring. How early-life experiences could cause permanent changes in sperm and eggs. Michael skinner has just uttered an astounding sentence, but by now he is so used to slaying...
The Little Word That Could
Byline: Jeremy McCarter Allan Metcalf's new book claims that the word "OK" is America's greatest invention. This offers a pair of provocations. How can "OK" be an invention? On a certain day, a certain guy just dreamed up the expression that has...
Wanted: BS Detectors
Byline: Sharon Begley What science ed should really teach. This column is about science education, but teachers and curriculum designers should turn the page now rather than risk apoplexy. Instead of making the usual boring plea for more resources...
What Rush Wants, Now and in 2012
Byline: Zev Chafets People sometimes ask Rush Limbaugh if he has plans to run for public office, and his answer is always the same--he can't afford the pay cut. This is a rare understatement by El Rushbo. His annual income is greater than the...