Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 17

A Galloping Dark Horse: Nobody Thought Bill Simon Had a Prayer of Winning California's Statehouse. What's He Doing in a Dead Heat?
Byline: Karen Breslau In Orange County, once represented by Rep. "B-1 Bob" Dornan, it's impossible to say anything too harsh about a Democrat--especially if his name is Gov. Gray Davis and you are the Republican nominee gunning for his job. Speaking...
A Leap of Faith: FBI Field Agents Fear the Bureau's New Powers May Not Have Their Intended Punch
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Daniel Klaidman You'd think there'd be high-fives in FBI field offices across the country. When Attorney General John Ashcroft and FBI Director Robert Mueller granted broad new powers to federal agents pursuing terrorists,...
'A Man Took Elizabeth': In Salt Lake City, a Teenage Girl Is Snatched from Her Slumber
Byline: Andrew Murr and Kevin Peraino Three hundred eighth graders and their families gathered in the auditorium of a Salt Lake City middle school Friday for what should have been a joyous occasion: graduation day. But as the diplomas were doled...
Another Ford Behind the Wheel: Henry Ford's Great-Great-Granddaughter Says She Has Gasoline in Her Veins. Now She Has a Chance to Prove It
Byline: Keith Naughton The lights come up in a warm, windowless conference room, and Elena Ford is not happy. As brand manager for Ford Motor Co.'s struggling Mercury car line, she is trying to reverse a serious sales skid in its most profitable...
A Secret Army's Vow: In Clandestine Meetings with NEWSWEEK, Pakistani Extremists Say Attacks in Indian-Held Kashmir Will Continue
Byline: Zahid Hussain and Ron Moreau The Pakistani guerrilla commander is thin, soft-spoken and ever so polite. So when Pakistani military officers invited him to an emergency meeting two weeks ago, he showed up as requested, even though he suspected...
At Long Last, 'Martha's Day': Dorthy Moxley Spent 27 Years Seeking Justice for Her Slain Daughter. She Finally Got It
Byline: Suzanne Smalley and T. Trent Gegax The journey from tragedy to truth would stretch more than a quarter century. There had long been whispers in moneyed Greenwich, Conn., that a son of privilege, Michael Skakel, a nephew of Ethel Kennedy,...
Battle of the Faithful: Catholics Are Voicing Hurt and Anger over the Church's Sexual-Abuse Crisis. Is the Hierarchy Listening?
Byline: David France Marty St. George moved to the front of the brightly lit cafeteria of St. Joseph School in Wilmette, Ill., a suburb north of Chicago, past more than 80 other parishioners who had come to an unofficial forum to offer their ideas...
Better Late Than Never: Imagine If Franklin Roosevelt Had Heard It Was Going to Take Two or Three Years to Put American Troops in the Field against Hitler
Byline: Jonathan Alter Not long after September 11, city officials told New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani that a damaged building near Ground Zero could not be reoccupied for at least 10 days. "It took God seven days to create the earth, so we can do...
Bush's Homeland Shuffle: Facing Fire, the President Hatched a Secret Plan. the Roots of a Shake-Up-And Whether It'll Make Us Safer
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper George W. Bush loves to have a secret plan, and to be with people who don't know what's about to hit them. Which is why he was such a suspiciously happy host at the White House's annual picnic for members...
Day of the 'Vampire': As the Loya Jirga Convenes in Kabul, a Nightmare from Afghanistan's Past Has Returned to Menace Its Future
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh Andsami Yousafzai Years after driving him out of the country, the people of Kabul still know him as "the Vampire." Even by the hellish standards of other Afghan warlords, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar's brutality stands out. During...
Goldilocks Was Right: What Makes a Bed Just Right
Byline: Temma Ehrenfeld Sooner or later, we all have to buy a new mattress. The choices are confusing: pillow top or cushion firm, springs or foam? Being a discriminating shopper means climbing into the sack in the middle of a crowded store while...
Hiding (and Seeking) Messages on the Web: Al Qaeda Uses the Web as a Communications Network
Byline: Colin Soloway, Rod Nordland and Barbie Nadeau One day last October, an intelligence-community analyst noticed something strange about a radical Islamist Web site she had been monitoring for several months. A previously open, innocuous part...
How to Play the eBay Game: Snipers, Bargains, Rip-Offs and Other Tricks of the Trade
Byline: Steven Levy Two minutes 14 seconds left, and beads of perspiration are forming on my forehead. The trigger for my sweat glands is my precarious status as high bidder on a Hawaiian shirt that I have viewed only in a fuzzy digital photo. I...
Living in the Shadow of a Lost Father: In 1970 I Struggled with the Shame That Came with a Parent's Death. How Times Have Changed
Byline: Adriana Gardella You don't have a father, you don't have a father!" Andrew O'Toole (all names have been changed) chanted from his front yard. My friend Catherine and I squatted at the end of her driveway, poking twigs into a puddle of hot,...
Meg Gets on the Line: For the CEO, Satisfying eBay's Tough Customers Is a Full-Time Job
Byline: Brad Stone Last month thousands of subscribers to Microsoft's free Hotmail service found themselves suffering from a punishing form of deprivation: they couldn't receive e-mail from eBay. EBay CEO Meg Whitman happened to be touring her company's...
Newsmakers
Byline: Allison Samuels Sex on film has long been the source of anxiety for celebrities--Pamela Anderson Lee, Rob Lowe, Tonya Harding--not smart enough to destroy the evidence. But singer R. Kelly is facing much more than a few sleepless nights....
Now, That's a Bad Sunburn! Predicting the Sun's Flare-Ups
Byline: Fred Guterl Grade-school teachers like to say that all life on Earth depends on the sun's energy for warmth, photosynthesis and perfect beach days. It is a reassuring message. Could there be a more reliable benefactor? But as astronomers...
Once an Addict. Jim Cramer Planned to Downshift His Life. Yeah, Right
Byline: Daniel McGinn At the height of the bull market in the late 1990s, money manager James Cramer would awaken at 2:45 a.m. By 3:30 he'd be on his way to Wall Street and the beginning of a 17-hour day on the trading desk at his hedge fund. As...
On the Road, to Stay in the Air: US Airways CEO Tries to Keep the Airline off the Ground
Byline: -Kevin Peraino Forget James Brown. The hardest-working man in the roadshow business these days is David Siegel, the new CEO of troubled US Airways. Siegel just spent two weeks barnstorming the East, warning his pilots, machinists and flight...
Perspectives
"This is Martha's day." Dorthy Moxley, after a jury found Michael Skakel guilty of beating her daughter to death in 1975 "She was able to see God's hand in it." Doug Burnham, speaking on behalf of American missionary Gracia Burnham, after her husband,...
Reality Bites: Once She Seemed Headed for Superstardom, Now She's Headed for Trial. Winona Ryder's a Great Actress. but Is She Really a Shoplifter-Or Just a Lost Soul?
Byline: Devin Gordon Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice! In the 1988 movie that made Winona Ryder a star, the only way to banish the crass, scheming demon haunting her house was to call his name aloud three times. Of course, he didn't go down...
So Berry Good for You: Rediscovering the Health Benefits of Berries
Byline: Anne Underwood Once upon a time, black raspberries just had no profile. Sure, this utilitarian fruit made tasty jams, jellies and ice cream. But ask a consumer what the berry actually was--hint: it's not a blackberry, but a smaller purple...
The eBay Way of Life: For Sale: A Castle in Tucson, a Bridal Gown, Tickle Me Elmo and Anything Else You Could Name. NEWSWEEK Spent 24 Hours in the World's Biggest Online Marketplace, Hoping to Learn What Makes America Click
Byline: Jerry Adler Behold, I have a broken Panasonic DVD player, in the original factory box. Actually, I have no such thing, and if I did, it would be shoved away someplace where I wouldn't have to face the existential choice of fixing it or...
The Editor's Desk: Exploring the Irresistible Allure of Online Auctions on eBay
Byline: -Mark Whitaker The designer of this week's cover, Bruce Ramsay, is an eBay addict. He goes to the Web site to bid on everything from old plastic Christmas ornaments (don't ask) to memorabilia from the 1967 Expo World's Fair in Montreal....
The Erosion of Confidence: Risk and Uncertainty Looms Large in Today's Economy
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson A decade ago, the idea that Japan might default on its government debt was a crackpot notion. Since World War II, no major industrial country had repudiated any of its debt, and Japan--the world's second largest economy...
The Illuminator: A Chat with Jonathan Safran Foer
Reviews of "Everything Is Illuminated," by Jonathan Safran Foer, are unanimously breathless--almost every critic connects the title with the 25-year-old author's brilliance. Liev Schreiber has bought the best seller's film rights, and Ethan Hawke will...
The People's Course: This Week, the U.S. Open Will Be Held on Long Island's Public Bethpage Black. the Cops, Plumbers and Other Locals Who Know It Best Have Some Tips for Golf's Elite
Byline: David Noonan It's Sunday and the faithful have gathered, but this is definitely not church. The cigars are lit, the beer is flowing and some of the language is, shall we say, out of bounds. A dozen or so members of the Nassau Players Club...
The Skittish Are Coming: Cool, Loud, Jittery Garage Bands like the Hives, the Vines and the Strokes Are Getting Rock Back on a Roll
Byline: Lorraine Ali If you're a rock fan, you've likely been depressed for the last decade, give or take a few years. These days rock equals clumsy rap-metal by brooding bands like Limp Bizkit or schlocky ballads by fifth-wave Pearl Jam ripoffs...
Turn Swords into Ballots: Yasir Arafat's Palestinian Authority, with Its Many Competing Militias and Corrupt Bosses, Was Tested in Crisis-And Crashed
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Last week's gruesome terror attacks in Israel made painfully clear that Ariel Sharon's invasion of the West Bank failed in its principal mission--to produce greater security for Israel. The military strikes, confiscation of...
With a No. 2 Pencil, Delete: The Destruction of Literature in the Name of Children
Byline: Anna Quindlen You can imagine how honored I was to learn that my work was going to be mangled for the sake of standardized testing. I got the word just after a vigilant parent had discovered that statewide English tests in New York had included...