Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 30

Al Qaeda's New Life: Bin Laden Loyalists Are Still Hiding and on the Run. but They're Also EVER MORE ACTIVE on the Web
Byline: Mark Hosenball The latest internet entertainment for aspiring Islamic holy warriors is a video montage that opens with a picture of Osama bin Laden set against a background of rugged mountains. Bin Laden is aiming an assault rifle across...
Anarchy on MTV? Tough Gals, Rejoice. Scrappy Skater Avril Lavigne Leads the Anti-Britney Revolution
Byline: Lorraine Ali Avril Lavigne is a good 15 minutes late, which is very unlike her, says her manager. Finally, thundering footsteps, hysterical screams and uncontrollable giggles echo in the corridor, the door of her hotel room swings open and...
A Strong Kick for American Soccer: Only 13, FREDDY ADU Could Become America's First Breakthrough Star
Byline: Mark Starr There was something of a legend growing around the boy--across the United States, it seemed anyone interested in youth soccer had heard of a preteen phenom named Freddy Adu. Even before the 12-year-old led his Maryland team to...
Begone, Buzz! Be Still, Soul. All the Miseries of Scrooge's Life in 'A Christmas Carol' Lead Up to This Great Misery: He Sees Himself Dying Alone and Unmourned
Byline: Anna Quindlen The streets of Manhattan are an anthill of frantic life. On Madison Avenue the shoppers push by one another, a clutch of bags with luxury logos fanning in their hands. The tourists peering down into the rink at Rockefeller...
Blood and Betrayal: JALAL TALABANI and MASSOUD BARZANI Lead the Kurds of Iraq-And They Have Agendas of Their Own
Byline: Christopher Dickey I trust America," a legendary Kurdish leader in Iraq declared some 30 years ago. "America is too great a power to betray a small people like the Kurds." He must have known better. The United States has been breaking promises...
Brainy, Blond and Ready to Rumble: JENNIFER GRANHOLM, Michigan's Shrewd New Governor, May Be the Democrats' Secret Weapon
Byline: Eleanor Clift One of the few bright spots for Democrats in the past year was the election of Jennifer Granholm as governor of Michigan. Her no-nonsense oratory, centrist politics and movie-star good looks have Democrats looking to her as...
Bulking Up for Baghdad: Soldier to the Core, TOMMY FRANKS Shuns Pomp-And Rallies His Troops
Byline: Evan Thomas About halfway through operation Internal Look--the military's just-completed practice run for a real war in Iraq--Gen. Tommy Franks, the overall combatant commander, held a banquet for his senior officers. Some 50 flag-rank officers,...
Bush's Man-And His Own
Byline: Howard Fineman As I followed Karl Rove's assistant up the narrow staircase to the second floor of the West Wing, I was reminded how different the place is from what you see on TV. People don't rush around; there are no spacious corridors,...
Dreamscapes: After the First Schemes for the WTC Site Tanked, There Is a Bold New Set of ALTERNATIVES FOR GROUND ZERO
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan The weather outside was icy, but inside, 250 journalists were gathered under an incongruous umbrella of palm trees in the atrium of a Manhattan office complex to see the latest schemes for rebuilding the World Trade Center...
Fighting Poverty, Fighting AIDS: JEFFREY SACHS, an Economist, Links Global Wealth to Global Health
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Jeffrey Sachs is an economist, not an evangelist. But give the man 10 minutes behind a microphone, and a scholarly symposium starts to feel like a revival meeting. "Ladies and gentlemen," he tells a hushed hall after describing...
Final Bows: Mobsters and Movie Stars, Singers and Sluggers, Judges, Jokers and More. A Look at Their Lives and Their Legacies. in Memoriam, 2002
QUEEN MOTHER, 101 Born to an aristocratic family during the last days of Victoria's reign, Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon married King George V's shy son Bertie. When his older brother, Edward VIII, abdicated in 1936 to marry Wallis Simpson, Bertie (now...
Kicking Hyundai into High Gear: Finbarr O'Neill Has Transformed the Korean Carmaker into a Player
Byline: Keith Naughton Back in 1998, the wheels were coming off at Hyundai. Leno and Letterman regularly made the shoddy Korean car a punch line--to jokes about Yugo. The home office in Seoul couldn't even recruit a seasoned American to jump-start...
Periscope: Special A-World-Still-on-Edge Edition
Shocker: The Yankees didn't even make it into the 2002 World Series. And Hollywood actually turned out several movies of interest to someone over the age of 13. In a year that will probably be remembered as a prelude to the Iraq War, the country settled...
Perspectives
TERROR "States like these, and their terrorist allies, constitute an Axis of Evil, arming to threaten the peace of the world." President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union address, on Iraq, Iran and North Korea "After all, this is...
Power in the Pews: VOICE OF THE FAITHFUL, Lay Catholics Speaking Out
Byline: Julie Scelfo Mary Ann Keyes is a retired preschool teacher and grandmother of four. Steve Krueger is a financial consultant. Maura O'Brien is a lawyer. But when the priest abuse scandal broke in January, they joined fellow Roman Catholics...
Race to the Exit: Politics 2002 Ends with Two Retreats-Lott's and Gore's. AS BUSH TURNS TO WAR, Democrats Must Score Points without Going Too Far
Byline: Evan Thomas and Eleanor Clift The White House strategy, stealthy and swift, went off without a hitch. On Friday morning, Dec. 20, President Bush was in the White House situation room for a briefing on Iraq when policy adviser Josh Bolten...
Reformer in the Ranks: DEBORAH LYNCH Pushes for Change in Chicago's Schools
Byline: Karen Springen Deborah Lynch is a study in paradox. The 50-year-old president of the Chicago Teachers Union is a union activist who pushes school reform, a Ph.D. who must help kids barely able to read and a tough negotiator known for her...
Synergy: Attacking on All Fronts: Team 'Matrix' Is Launching Not Only Two Sequels, but a Multimedia Offensive with Videogames and Anime
Byline: N'GAI Croal Everyone who has worked with the Wachowskis is convinced that the brothers are two of the most extravagantly talented people they've ever met. What they're less sure of, however, is when, or if, the Wachowskis actually sleep....
The Biggest Hole in the Net: ONE DAY SOON, America May Be Rocked by a Suicide Bomber. We Have No System to Deal with That Eventuality. Why the Debate over a National ID Card Is Long Overdue
Byline: Steven Brill Buried on page 177 of the new law establishing the Department of Homeland Security is a one-sentence provision that has so far escaped public notice: "Nothing in this act shall be construed to authorize the development of a...
The Big Story Everyone Missed: People Who Were Whipped into a Frenzy about the 'Chinese Peril' Must Wonder What Happened. but Washington's Shift in Attitude Is a Return to Sanity
Byline: Fareed Zakaria This year has been the first year of the post-9-11 world. So as 2002 winds up, it's a good time to look back and ask, "Who are the winners and losers of the new international order?" The losers are obvious--Saddam Hussein,...
The Boom in My Own Backyard
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Sometimes the best stories are just up the block--literally. A little over a year ago, I began noticing that homes in my neighborhood were selling at what seemed like astounding prices, 25 percent or more beyond what...
The CEO Party Is Over: THEY HAD A GREAT RIDE, but after a Year of Scandals, They'll Have to Work Harder for a Smaller Pay Package
Byline: Keith Naughton It's official. After all the perp walks, Martha's mess, Jack's divorce and implosions of companies like Enron and WorldCom, CEOs now rank below funeral directors and lawyers in a new Gallup poll. Worse still, they're even...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker A year ago we introduced a new year-end feature called "Who's Next." While others looked back at the events of the past, we peered ahead at the people who would be making news in 2002. So how did we do with our selections?...
The Future? It's All Sewn Up. Fashion Marches on. Meet HOT YOUNG DESIGNERS with Cachet-If Not Cash
Byline: Susannah Meadows For all its supposed sophistication, the fashion industry is a lot like a beauty pageant. Girls twinkle across stages in evening gowns and swimwear. Judges lick their chops. When it's over, most of the designers have to...
The Man Who Will Run China: Mystery Man HU JINTAO Is Taking Power. Don't Underestimate Him
Byline: Melinda Liu Hu Jintao has a trait that's rarer than his photographic memory: the more power he has, the more enigmatic he becomes. Even longtime colleagues in the Politburo are stumped by the flawlessly smooth exterior of China's new party...
The Matrix Makers: One Year, Two Sequels-And a Revolution in Moviemaking. an Exclusive Look Behind the Scenes of 2003's Hottest Flicks
Byline: Devin Gordon The Warner Brothers studio lot in Burbank, Calif., is frenetic on most days, but on a Thursday in early November it was really humming. The company's box-office Bigfoot for 2002, "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets," was...
The Sniper Hits Home
Byline: Pat Wingert In early October, two snipers went on a killing spree in suburban Montgomery County, Md., leaving four dead within hours. The gas station where they killed one victim was only a mile from the school that my youngest children...
Training to Cover a War
Byline: Adam Piore I'm sprinting across a field, the helicopter rotors so deafening that I can't tell where the machine-gun fire is coming from. "Get down! Spread out!" shouts the sergeant. I trip over one of my squadmates and fall on top of him....
Waiting for a Date with the Supremes: ALBERTO GONZALES, Bush's Friend and Counsel, May Be Next on the Court
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Tamara Lipper Chances are, you wouldn't recognize Alberto Gonzales if he passed you on the street. George W. Bush's White House counsel is not a fixture on the Sunday-morning news shows. But if his face is unfamiliar,...