Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 24

Al Qaeda's Money Man: Investigators Hope the Arrest of a Key 'Paymaster' May Provide Clues to the Terrorist-Funding Trail
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff When Pakistani agents burst into a Rawalpindi apartment earlier this month and hauled away Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, they could hardly believe their good luck. Not only had they finally nabbed one of the...
A New Baby Debate: As Pro-Lifers Adopt Embryos, Critics Raise Questions
Byline: Suzanne Smalley After five years of fruitless fertility treatments, including three in vitro fertilization attempts, Cara and Gregg Vest wondered if they would ever have a baby. "I was very sad because I wanted to be a mom so desperately,...
At the Top of the Class: KIPP Programs Could Revolutionize Charter Schools in Poor Districts-If They Can Just Keep Their Grades Up
Byline: Pat Wingert and Barbara Kantrowitz Adalberto Garza's 13-year- old son, Adalberto Jr., was tagged a problem learner in his Houston elementary school. He's dyslexic and, because his first language is Spanish, English-speaking teachers often...
Babylonian Booty: Ancient Mesopotamia, Modern Iraq: Once Again, Bombing and Looting Threaten the Cradle of Civilization
Byline: Melinda Liu and Anne Underwood It had been conquered and re-conquered a dozen or more times, by (among others) the Akkadians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Macedonians, Parthians, Arabs, Ottomans and British, and in February 1991, yet...
Blair Sweats It Out: Bush May Have Angered Much of the World, and Even His Most Stalwart Ally Faces a Revolt within His Own Political Party
Byline: Stryker McGuire Tony Blair thought he was doing the world a favor. After the attacks of September 11, the British prime minister calculated that he could restrain President George W. Bush's instinctive unilateralism and turn him into "a...
Exclusive: No Sky over Turkey?
Byline: Owen Matthews, John Barry and Sami Kohen U.S. military planning has hit a giant roadblock. Turkish leaders, having failed to persuade their Parliament to OK the deployment of 62,000 U.S. ground troops for a northern front against Iraq, has...
Finding Elizabeth: She Was in Plain Sight. A Girl Missing for Nine Months Suddenly Shows Up, Alive. Elizabeth Smart's Journey to Hell and Back Again-And the Healing That Lies Ahead
Byline: Dirk Johnson and Elise Christenson The lost angel has come home. In a handsome house in the Utah foothills, Elizabeth Smart snuggled with her little brother on her lap. She watched her favorite movie, "The Trouble With Angels"--about rebellious...
Has Basketball Become Hockey on Hardwood? When Rough Play Is Considered Fair Play, Kids like Jim Get Hurt. at Least Football Players Wear Helmets
Byline: Robert E. O'Connor The score was 41-40, and there were 20 seconds left to play. Our team held both the lead and the basketball. All we had to do was run out the clock. The fans were in a frenzy. The other coach was screaming furiously...
Mail Call: Looking for Guidance in Turbulent Times
Demonstrating the power of religion as a subject, nearly 800 readers responded passionately to our March 10 cover package on Bush and God. Approximately three quarters of those, many of them self-proclaimed Christians, criticized President Bush for...
Media: Music to My Ears
If 50 cent is what's in your wallet, and not in your CD player, Alan Light's new music magazine may be worth a read. The former Spin editor and partners recently reached a publishing deal, and Light, 36, sang a duet about the September release with...
Newsmakers
Byline: Joan Raymond, Mark Starr Now for a Breath of Fresh Air For the first time in eight years, Christopher Reeve can literally wake up and smell the coffee. The 50-year-old self-proclaimed "lab rat" is only the third patient to receive a small...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Fox News, New York Times, Boston Globe, Associated Press, Toledo Blade, 20/20, The Hill, Associated Press (2), Reuters "I just held her, held her all the way home." Ed Smart, on being reunited with his...
Powell in the Bunker: The Diplomatic Fight Is Almost Finished. but the Blame Game Has Just Begun
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Tamara Lipper Beyond his ornate waiting rooms, and behind his vast outer office, there's a small, intimate study where Colin Powell retreats from the public posturing of international politics. It's rare for any foreign...
Productivity's False Facade
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson "Importantly, the favorable underlying trends in productivity have continued... [providing] support of household incomes." --Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, in congressional testimony, Feb. 11,...
Real World Robots: They're Finally among Us. They May Not Look like the Jetsons' Rosie, but They Are Actually Doing Real Jobs Alongside Humans-In Homes, Hospitals and on the Battlefield
Byline: Brad Stone Asimo, the Honda Motor Corp.'s cream-colored, humanoid robot, is a mechanical marvel. It has two legs, red lights for eyes, can climb stairs and wave. But as a true robot--a machine that thinks on its own--Asimo is a big, fat...
Rumble for the Robes: Miguel Estrada Is No Household Name. but Both Parties See His Bid for a Judgeship as an Issue in 2004
Byline: Debra Rosenberg When George W. Bush nominated him to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia in May 2001, Miguel Estrada seemed like a shoo-in. A 41-year-old Honduran immigrant with a solid resume, he'd clerked for Supreme...
Saving for College: Baby Wants Tuition Payments
Byline: Linda Stern Diapers, $11.39, check. Soccer shoes, $55, check. Four years in a private college circa 2021, $345,000. Gaak! No wonder panicking parents are flocking to 529 college savings plans. Money grows in them tax-free--if it's used for...
Shuttle Disaster: A New 'Leading Theory'
Byline: Mark Hosenball The Columbia shuttle investigation is now focusing on a problem that NASA officials say they have not previously encountered: possible serious in-flight damage to ultra-high-tech material used to protect the leading edges...
Some Strange Spring Break
Byline: Anna Quindlen Weirder than anything you've seen on "Cops," scarier than the Sci Fi Channel, more changes of plans than "Trading Spaces," more Francophobe comments than "National Lampoon's European Vacation": welcome to Spring Break '03!...
Special Finance Guide: Make Your Money Grow
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Ok, Gen-xers, forward march. You've done parties and credit cards, hookups and unemployment lines. Now it's time to get serious about your money. You won't have as much fun today as we all had years ago, when any dummy...
Spector's New Song: Pop Icon's Latest Claim Not a Hit with the Police
Byline: Seth Mnookin Last Monday was supposed to be a redemptive day for Phil Spector. The Righteous Brothers, one of the myriad bands Spector ushered to superstardom in the 1960s, were being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as was...
Start Saving Now: A Buck Here, A Buck There
Byline: Dori R. Perrucci You're young, and everything seems possible. Except saving money, of course. Take that entry-level salary, subtract rent, car payments, bar tabs, movie tickets and gym dues, and you're left with a worn-out credit card, not...
State-of-the-Art Stats: Forget about Batting Average-That's So over. Today's Big-Leaguers Are Measured by Fancier Formulas
Byline: Mark Starr Peering down from his office above the third-base stands at the Red Sox spring-training field in Ft. Myers, Fla., general manager Theo Epstein can be forgiven if even he can't tell the players without a scorecard. Since Epstein...
The Arrogant Empire: America's Unprecedented Power Scares the World, and the Bush Administration Has Only Made It Worse. How We Got Here-And What We Can Do about It Now
Byline: Fareed Zakaria with bureau reports The United States will soon be at war with Iraq. It would seem, on the face of it, a justifiable use of military force. Saddam Hussein runs one of the most tyrannical regimes in modern history. For more...
The Droids of Sport: Robotic Competitions Are Popping Up around the World. A New Book, 'Gearheads,' Examines Their Universe
Byline: Brad Stone In March of 2004, teams of roboticists, off-road enthusiasts and garage gearheads will set out in a giant caravan on the same potentially lucrative journey attempted by countless others over the years: the drive from L.A. to Las...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker A month after September 11, our columnist and NEWSWEEK international Editor Fareed Zakaria wrote a cover story called "Why They Hate Us" that became one of the most talked-about pieces the magazine has ever published. At a...
"There Is a Legend. and to Protest Is Daft.": At 70, Peter O'Toole Is about to Receive a Lifetime Achievement Oscar He Wasn't Sure He Wanted. an Exclusive Interview
Byline: Malcolm Jones Barbara Hershey, his co-star in "The Stunt Man," put it best. "When you meet Peter O'Toole," she once said, "he does not disappoint." But how can this be true? Here, after all, is the actor who first strode into the public...
The Unmighty Dollar: A Costly War Could Drive More Foreign Investors Away from the United States, Hurting Living Standards and Our Influence Abroad
Byline: Clyde V. Prestowitz Jr. Prestowitz is president of the Economic Strategy Institute and author of the forthcoming book "Rogue Nation." As America prepares for war, all eyes are fixed on the capabilities of its troops and high-tech weapons....
We're Glorified Schleppers: Behind Every Gorgeous Superstar Is Another Kind of Celebrity: The Stylist
Byline: Susannah Meadows In Hollywood a career can be made with a single dress. Three weeks before the Academy Awards, designers were frantically sewing one-of-a-kind gowns. Some actresses had stopped eating altogether. And on a Thursday in early...