Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 5

A Moment of Moral Clarity; after Unconscionable Foot-Dragging by the White House, We're Beginning to Get to the Bottom of the Most Searing Event of Our Time
Byline: Jonathan Alter On Sept. 14, 2001, I was in the press pool at ground zero and stood five feet from President Bush, who had mounted a crushed fire truck, slung his arm around an exquisitely wizened firefighter and told the world through a...
A New Face in Space; an Inventor Plans to Be the Next Civilian to Blast Off
Byline: Brad Stone Employees are whispering at the Princeton, N.J. -based Sensors Unlimited. CEO Gregory Olsen, typically a self-professed "nose to the grindstone" workaholic, has been disappearing for weeks at a time and, when he does come in,...
Another Damsel, Deep in Distress
Byline: David Ansen At the lurid heart of all of Lars von Trier's recent melodramas is a woman bravely suffering the slings and arrows of the cruelest fortune that fate (a.k.a. von Trier) can dish out. His chosen victim this time is Nicole Kidman,...
A Woman Can Learn Anything a Man Can; I Worried That My Gender Was Holding Me Back, until I Realized the Boys Were Studying Just as Hard
Byline: Carolyn Turk, Turk lives in Silver Spring, Md. When I was a kid, everything in my bedroom was pink. I have two sisters and we had a complete miniature kitchen, a herd of My Little Ponies and several Barbie and Ken dolls. We didn't have any...
Black like Whom? Justin Loses Cred
Byline: Allison Samuels Has Justin Timberlake's all-access pass to the black entertainment universe been revoked? Few white artists have enjoyed as much support among African- Americans as Timberlake, thanks to a debut solo CD jammed with classic...
Bonds of Steel; Keeping Faith: The Families of 9/11 Victims Are a Mighty Force. Ask the White House, the Commission-Or Anyone Else in Their Way
Byline: Pat Wingert, With Tamara Lipper, Holly Bailey, Martha Brant, Karen Breslau and Rebecca Sinderbrand For two long days last week, Lorie Van Auken sat in a stiff, armless chair in the 9/11 commission hearing room, right behind the witness table,...
Breaking the Brokers; as Housing Prices Keep Heading through the Roof, More Sellers Are Balking at Paying Full Commissions. Some Agents Are Even Joining in This Homegrown Rebellion
Byline: Daniel McGinn When Larry and Jean Weed of Sparks, Nev., decided to sell their home, they invited some real-estate agents by for a visit. Most offered to sell the house the old-fashioned way, by listing it in the local brokers' database and...
Cartoons: Having a 'Bad Time'
Byline: Bret Begun If you think cartoons are funny, pick up Bruce Eric Kaplan's new collection, out this week. The New Yorker regular (and TV writer) got literary with NEWSWEEK's Bret Begun: You called this collection "This Is a Bad Time." Why?...
Chalabi: A Questionable Use of U.S. Funding
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Hirsh Ahmad Chalabi has never paid much attention to rules. As an international financier, he was convicted in absentia in 1992 of embezzling millions from his own bank in Jordan. In the mid-'90s, the CIA tried...
China, Trade and Progress; Working Conditions in China Today Don't Look Too Different from Those in the United States a Century Ago, When We Were First Industrializing
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The test of a first-class mind is the ability to hold two opposing views... at the same time and still retain the ability to function," F. Scott Fitzgerald once said. So it is with China and trade. On the one hand, expanded...
Doughnuts in the Dark; New Treatments Offer Hope for Night Eating Disorders
Byline: Anne Underwood Shelly's Snack Shop was the name that Brian Egemo of Badger, Iowa, applied to his wife's side of the bed. In 1994 Shelly, who had been a sleepwalker as a child, began sleepwalking again. But this time, her nightly rambles...
Father of a Revolution; Here's the Man Who Invented Modern Industrial Design
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan You may find it hard to believe that all the stuff in "Shock of the Old," the current show at the Cooper-Hewitt museum in New York, was designed in one era, let alone by one man. From richly patterned wallpaper (that looks...
Generation Born Free; 'Granny Must Groove,' Rap the Youth in South Africa. but Do They Know How She Fought for Their Freedom?
Byline: Tom Masland The African National Congress bused teenagers to downtown Johannesburg by the hundreds last week for a Human Rights Day holiday festival. For old activists, the venue conjured up the sting of tear gas: Newtown, with its Market...
Guns over Gaza; Israel's Assassination of the Hamas Spiritual Leader Was Not Just Another Eye for an Eye. It Was Part of a Broader Strategy
Byline: Joshua Hammer, With Dan Ephron in Gaza When Israel killed Hamas spiritual leader Sheik Ahmed Yassin with a missile last week, the assassination appeared to be just another tit-for-tat strike in a game of escalating violence. Tens of thousands...
Health: Helping Depressed Kids
Byline: Mary Carmichael It was a news story certain to stoke public fears. Last week the FDA announced that antidepressants, the very drugs that were supposed to lift patients out of emotional danger, might cause some of them to worsen and even...
Meet the Punisher; Lars Von Trier Devastates Audiences-And Actresses
Byline: Dana Thomas Lars von Trier stretches out on the Louis XIV sofa in his hotel room in Trollhattan, Sweden, where he's just started his next film, "Manderlay," and puts his hands behind his head. "So, you are the shrink?" he says to the reporter....
Newsmakers
Byline: Devin Gordon Q&A: ELISHA CUTHBERT On TV's "24," she plays the perpetually imperiled Kim Bauer. On April 9, she stars in the teen comedy "The Girl Next Door" as a sweetheart with a not-so-sweet secret. Elisha Cuthbert spilled the beans...
Oscar Junior; an Awards Show You Don't Sleep through? Nickelodeon's Given New Meaning to the Words 'Hollywood Slime.'
Byline: Marc Peyser Cameron Diaz is a much better burper than she lets on. She'll tell you how she has to really work at it, to practice her timing. "I'm not one of those natural burpers who can just swallow air and bring it back up. Mine has to...
Party of One; Joining Forces: The Stars Were Aligned, and the Clarke Buzz Was Loud. but the Dems Are Still Struggling to Dent Bush's Wartime Appeal
Byline: Howard Fineman, With Richard Wolffe, Tamara Lipper and Holly Bailey in Washington Weeks before Richard Clarke's assault, the anti-Bush universe was alive with anticipatory chatter. "Clarke's book is going to be devastating," a member of...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Associated Press, USA Today, The Washington Post, London Telegraph, USA Today, Associated Press, Philadelphia Inquirer, New York Daily News, E! Online, UPI "I changed my mind. I didn't want to die anymore."...
Retailing: Trading Spaces, and Jabs; Home Depot and Lowe's Duke It out over Fixer-Uppers
Byline: Peg Tyre Laurie Gearhart of Marietta, Ga., is the kind of customer who gives Home Depot CEO Bob Nardelli nightmares. When Gearhart needs parts for her sink, she shops at Home Depot. But for paint, garden supplies and hardware, she heads...
Show Us Your Soul; on Her New CD, Janet Hides in Plain Sight
Byline: Lorraine Ali On the kickoff track of the new "Damita Jo," Janet Jackson's eighth album, she whispers, "We're vulnerable"--and who would know better what it's like to stand exposed? Her Super Bowl debacle/accident/publicity stunt aside, she's...
Spies: Too Little Sharing; One Big Flaw Revealed by 9/11 Was the Lack of Cooperation among American Spy Agencies. It's Still a Sore Point
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Mark Hosenball, With John Barry How prepared is America for the next 9/11? The Bush administration's response to the U.S. intelligence and law-enforcement agencies' failure to communicate is the Terrorist Threat Integration...
Terrorists Don't Need States; the Danger Is Less That a State Will Sponsor a Terror Group and More That a Terror Group Will Sponsor a State-As Happened in Afghanistan
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Stepping away from the partisan screaming going on these days, the 9/11 commission hearings and--far more revealing--the panel's staff reports paint a fascinating picture of...
The Books: The Kiss-and-Tell Club; Sometimes They Avenge. Sometimes They Expose. Sometimes, They Even Sell. the Political Memoir, through the Ages
Byline: Michael Beschloss, Presidential historian Beschloss's latest book is "The Conquerors: Roosevelt, Truman and the Destruction of Hitler's Germany." In 1939 Raymond Moley, a onetime member of Franklin Roosevelt's "brain trust," published a...
The Diva Grapevine; with Style and Charm, 10 Savvy Friends from Boston Are Changing the World of Women and Wine, One Glass at Time
Byline: Mark Starr The dishes are sublime, from the salmon and caramelized onion dip that whets appetites to the classic caramel flan that caps the meal. So, too, is the dish, a veritable tour of sex and their city, from the surprise Vegas elopement...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker It was one of the most haunting moments of Richard Clarke's riveting testimony before the 9/11 commission. Trying to cut through all the "what ifs," former Democratic congressman Tim Roemer asked the ex-terrorism czar whether...
The Elephant in the Room; If the President, and the Presidential Candidate, Understand How the Attacks Changed Us, They Will Change the Spirit of Their Campaigns
Byline: Anna Quindlen Sometimes the big jets fly so low over the Hudson that you'd swear if you squinted hard you could see the profiles of the passengers sitting in the window seats. I'm not the only one who follows their path across the sky, who...
The Insider; the Town Crier: He Came, He Bore Witness and He Sent Washington into a Frenzy. How Richard Clarke Fueled a Firestorm over Who's to Blame for 9/11, Why Two Presidents Missed the Warning Signs-And What We Can Learn to Keep It from Happening Again
Byline: Evan Thomas, Michael Isikoff and Tamara Lipper, With John Barry, Daniel Klaidman, Pat Wingert and Mark Hosenball in Washington What does Richard Clarke have against Condoleezza Rice? In his book, "Against All Enemies," Clarke, the former...