Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 16

A Boardroom Shuffle That Made Big News; the Wall Street Journal Settles the Succession Question
Byline: Jonathan Darman Peter Kann was a hands-on CEO of Dow Jones, except when it came to choosing his own successor. Just about a year ago, Dow Jones's board informed him of its intention to find a replacement in time for his mandatory retirement...
A Dark Place; A West Virginia Mining Community Searches for Answers after an Underground Explosion Claimed 12 of Its Sons
Byline: Pat Wingert and Arian Campo-Flores (With Steve Tuttle and Daren Briscoe in Washington) Marshall Winans had always yearned to follow in his father's footsteps and work in the coal mines. When his mother, Helen, warned him of the dangers,...
A Map for the Medicare Maze; for Part D, the Biggest Problem Lies Ahead: Persuading Seniors to Sign Up. of Those with the Choice, Only 1 Million Have Joined So Far
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Computer crashes, jammed phone lines, longtime prescriptions no longer covered--but also a lot of prescriptions smoothly and rapidly filled. That was the look of the new drug benefit...
A Washington Tidal Wave; Blackjack: Members of Congress Rushed to Give Back Money. DeLay Stepped Aside. Reformers Pledged to Fix the System. Can Anything Change the Capitol's Money-Hungry Ways? Behind the Abramoff Lobby Scandal
Byline: Michael Isikoff, Holly Bailey and Evan Thomas (With Mark Hosenball and Eleanor Clift) First came the dinner invitations, then the tickets. Staffers in the office of former House Majority leader Tom DeLay could dine--usually, free of charge--at...
Big Benefits from Small Changes; You Don't Have to Break a Sweat to Improve Your Health, You Just Need to Get Moving
Byline: Harvey B. Simon, M.D. (Simon is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. His new book, "The No Sweat Exercise Plan: Lose Weight, Get Healthy, and Live Longer" (<I>McGraw-Hill</I>), is being published this month....
Drive Time: Detroit Style; Hot Rods for 2006
The Detroit Auto Show is to cars what New York's Fashion Week is to couture--the premier preview of what styles are coming down the road. Dozens of automotive fashion statements will be unveiled this week in the Motor City. TIP SHEET, though, got a...
Drive Time: The Shape of Things to Come
Byline: Keith Naughton There's just 24 hours left to finish Ford Motor Co.'s most audacious Detroit Auto Show concept car and the designers are getting nervous. The vehicle--an opulent pickup truck--lies in hundreds of pieces on the dusty floor...
Ed Schools vs. Education; Prospective Teachers Are Expected to Have the Correct 'Disposition,' Proof of Which Is Espousing 'Progressive' Political Beliefs
Byline: George F. Will The surest, quickest way to add quality to primary and secondary education would be addition by subtraction: Close all the schools of education. Consider The Chronicle of Higher Education's recent report concerning the schools...
From New Kid on the Job to Tribal Elder; to Keep Up with the Twentysomethings around Me, I've Had to Learn to Talk Fast and Listen Faster
Byline: Bob Brody (Brody lives in Forest Hills, N.Y.) I still have no clue how i became just about the oldest person in our office. Somehow, I must have missed the memo that was supposed to give me the heads-up. Today got here faster than I ever...
Gut Flora? Great! Maintaining a Balance of Microorganisms Can Help Strengthen Your Overall Health
Byline: Mary Carmichael You may use antibacterial dish soap and wash your hands every time you sneeze, but Jeffrey Gordon wants you to know that you're crawling with germs. Gordon, the director of the Center for Genome Sciences at Washington University...
Hard to the Core; Increasing the Strength of the Torso Isn't a Fitness Fad, It's One Key to Healthier Aging-And Can Even Help Active Folks Stay Injury-Free
Byline: Peg Tyre and Jennifer Barrett David Burnes was on a walking tour of Madrid last fall when the low-grade discomfort he'd been feeling in his back for weeks morphed into molar-grinding pain. Burnes, 50, realized he needed serious medical attention...
Heart of a Nation; Sharon's Outsize Life-And the Future of the Land He Helped Build
Byline: Kevin Peraino, Dan Ephron and Jeffrey Bartholet (With Joanna Chen in Jerusalem, Nuha Musleh in the West Bank, Michael Hirsh and Richard Wolffe in Washington, Christopher Dickey in Paris and Alan Isenberg in New York Grahpic by Andrew Romano)...
I'm Not Afraid; He's Always Spoken His Mind, and Fought for His Beliefs. A Personal Portrait
Byline: Lally Weymouth He was finished. In the early 1980s, when I first met Ariel Sharon, he was a once great general who was widely blamed for Israel's failed war in Lebanon and for the slaughter of Palestinian refugees by Christian militias in...
Lining Up at the Starting Gate
Until last week, Israel's upcoming elections felt like little more than a formality. Now the contest is wide open. As quietly as possible, not wanting to seem disrespectful, the entrants are preparing for the run of their lives. The prize: Israel's...
Mail Call: Rising Stars of 2006
Bringing a Controversial Best Seller to the Screen Our year-end inside peek at "The Da Vinci Code" (Jan. 2), the anxiously awaited movie based on the best-selling book, drew a mixed response. One reader praised the article as "great" for having...
Movies: Can Apes Win Oscars?
Byline: Devin Gordon Technically speaking, yes, they can. With ballots for Academy Award nominations due on Jan. 21, all that voters have to do to honor Andy Serkis's momentous work as Kong in director Peter Jackson's "King Kong" is scribble in...
Newsmakers
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh, Devin Gordon RYAN SEACREST Ryan Seacrest is back hosting the fifth season of "American Idol," which premieres Jan. 17. He spoke to NEWSWEEK's Ramin Setoodeh. How many jobs do you have now? I have to count. I have...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: New York Times, The Washington Post (2), petetownshend.co.uk, Associated Press, New York Times, The Washington Post, Reuters, The Washington Post "Tell all--I see them on the other side." Martin Toler Jr., in a note...
Sense and Sensuality; Cooking and Eating Have Never Been So Fraught. We Find Sweet Satisfaction in Getting Up Close to Our Ingredients and Hands-On with Our Prep
Byline: Dorothy Kalins These days there is a man with a whip on my shoulder, punishing me before I even open my mouth. No sooner do I crack a restaurant menu than out he jumps, threatening me away from not just the obvious (cheeseburgers and tiramisu)...
Smoking: Great Grades for Maine
Byline: Jennifer Barrett For the past four years, the American Lung Association has published annual report cards for each state based on its tobacco-control and -prevention efforts. None ever got straight A's--until now. In the 2005 State of Tobacco...
Stem Cells: Sizing Up 'SCNT'
Byline: Claudia Kalb and B. J. Lee Get ready for "Hwang-gate" mania. This week investigators at Seoul National University plan to release the final report on their fallen hero, scientist Hwang Woo-suk. The university has already deemed Hwang's much-heralded...
Still Going Strong; Jack LaLanne Is a Living Testament to the Enduring Benefits of Diet and Exercise
Byline: Peg Tyre Decades before Jane Fonda felt the burn and Suzanne Somers thinned her thighs, Jack LaLanne was teaching Americans how to stay trim. At every stage of his 70-year career--first as a competitive body-builder and gym owner, later...
Super Nutrients; Are You Really Getting All the Vitamins, Minerals and Fatty Acids You Need?
Byline: Anne Underwood (Graphic by Josh Ulick) It sounds like a simple question of logic. If bones require calcium, then people who eat a lot of calcium-rich dairy products should have extra-strong bones, right? So why are hip fractures uncommon...
Supplements Aren't the Secret to Health; Our Harvard Expert Advises Going Easy on Soda and Sweet Rolls, and Getting out of the Car More Often
Byline: Dr. Meir Stampfer (Stampfer is chairman of the department of epidemiology and professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is also professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the author of more...
Supreme Court: Tune in; A TV Guide to the Alito Hearings
Byline: Stuart Taylor Jr. and Evan Thomas The senate confirmation hearings for a nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court are rarely a process of straightforward questions and answers. A potential Supreme Court justice cannot promise to vote a certain...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker In the year since he took over our Jerusalem bureau, Kevin Peraino has grown used to the hectic pace of Israeli life--an intensity that sometimes makes it feel as though there are 48 hours in a day. But as news spread that...
The Gurus' Guide to Daily Nutrition; Five Experts Talk about What They Take and Offer Tips for Getting the Vitamins and Nutrients You Need
Byline: Jennifer Barrett If you eat a well-balanced diet, do you need to take a multivitamin, too? What about supplements such as calcium and fish oils? Can too many vitamins be dangerous? Each week, it seems, there's a new study trumpeting the...
The Myth of the Mid Life Crisis; It's Time We Stopped Dismissing Middle Age as the Beginning of the End. Research Suggests That at 40, the Brain's Best Years Are Still Ahead
Byline: Gene Cohen, M.D., PH.D. (Cohen is founding director of the Center on Aging, Health & Humanities at George Washington University Medical Center. This article is adapted from "The Mature Mind: The Positive Power of the Aging Brain," published...
The New (Est) Rules of Television
Byline: Steven Levy Last week the Consumer Electronics Show filled up Las Vegas with more than 130,000 people and countless cell phones, camcorders, flash drives, car stereos, MP3 players and porn stars. In a state-of-the-industry speech, Gary Shapiro,...
The Things That Have Not Changed; the Great Obstacle to Progress Is No Longer Israeli Intentions but Rather Palestinian Capabilities
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) The graveyards are filled with indispensable men, Charles de Gaulle once remarked. Ariel Sharon would seem to be the exception, one who truly became irreplaceable in his final...
Wealth and Weight Loss; If You Want to Be Thin, It Might Help to Think like a CEO
Byline: Jennifer Barrett At her posh Park Avenue practice in New York, Dr. Jana Klauer helps CEOs, socialites and celebrities slim down. Now she's sharing her secrets with the rest of us. In "How the Rich Get Thin," published this month by St. Martin's...
'What's Kodak's Strategy?'
Byline: Brad Stone Take a snapshot today of the 113-year-old photo icon Eastman Kodak, and it will probably turn out dark. The decline of traditional cameras and film, and the explosive rise of digital photography, has sharply cut into sales and...
Whom Can You Believe? There Is Real Science Behind Nutritional Advice, but No Single Study Is Definitive
Byline: Meir J. Stampfer, M.D., PH.D., and Patrick J. Skerrett (Stampfer, who chairs the department of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, is the editor of "Vitamins and Minerals: What You Need to Know," published by Harvard Medical...