Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 08, February 23

'All I Wanted Was to Talk to My Family, and Get Some Dry Socks'
Byline: Capt. Chesley B. Sullenberger III; Sullenberger and his crew saved all 155 lives aboard US Airways Flight 1549. One month ago, I landed Flight 1549 safely in the Hudson River. In some ways, that was the easy part. The night of the accident,...
A Matter of Honor
Byline: John Barry; With Evan Thomas and Pat Wingert I witnessed the ceremony at Dover. I'm not sure it needs flashbulbs. I saw the coffins arrive by accident. I was at Dover Air Force Base a couple of years ago pursuing another story on my Pentagon...
A Torture Report Could Spell Big Trouble for Bush Lawyers
Byline: Michael Isikoff An internal Justice Department report on the conduct of senior lawyers who approved waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics is causing anxiety among former Bush administration officials. H. Marshall Jarrett, chief...
Bootleggers' Delights
Byline: George F. Will Banning Sunday liquor sales pleases Baptists--and also pleases bootleggers by increasing demand for their services. In the name of "stimulus," Washington is radically broadening its supervision of the economy, so it is...
Captain Repo
Byline: Eve Conant When boat owners fall behind on loan payments, 'recovery agents' can snatch the floating collateral. It's the perfect hour for a leisurely cruise: late afternoon on a sunny Friday at a ritzy yacht club in Sarasota, Fla. But...
Fear Comes to the Russian Heartland
Byline: Owen Matthews and Anna Nemtsova It may be too late for Putin to avoid trouble in hundreds of rust-belt 'monotowns.' Traces of the boom years linger in Magnitogorsk, a steel town of nearly 500,000 straddling the Ural River, about 900 miles...
He's out for the Count
Byline: Mark Hosenball During his public explanation of why he withdrew from consideration to be President Obama's commerce secretary, Republican Sen. Judd Gregg mentioned a dispute over control of the Census Bureau, which is gearing up for its...
He's the Angel of Harlem
Geoffrey Canada leads a nonprofit that helps thousands of poor city kids. The secret: conquering one block at a time. The New York Times has called it one of the most ambitious social experiments of our time. The Harlem Children's Zone grew out...
Israel's Biggest Danger
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Today they're 20 percent of the country's population. Demographers predict they'll be 25 percent by 2025. Even before a new coalition could emerge, Israel's latest election was historic. It marked the collapse of Labor,...
It's a Small World after All
Byline: Michael Hirsh Secretary of State was the consolation prize, but Hillary Clinton was still delighted to get it. Her problem now is that the Obama administration is populated with big players--and some big egos--who are stealing away her turf...
Lessons in Survival
The science that explains why elite military forces bounce back faster than the rest of us. In a laboratory, it's extremely difficult to study why some people are better at bouncing back than others because it's so hard to simulate the real stresses...
No One Wants to Hug a Banker
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Nick Summers in New York and Daniel Stone in Washington Arrogance is also a factor: people who have done very well in finance tend to think they're really good at everything they do. The most riveting drama in Washington...
Oscar on Line One
It looked like Harvey Weinstein had been 'aufed,' as they say on 'Project Runway.' Then came 'The Reader.' Harvey Weinstein loves a good story, especially when it stars Harvey Weinstein. This one begins 12 years ago, when the then-head of Miramax...
Our Model Marriage
Byline: Andrew Romano The Obamas have the kind of relationship millennials aspire to. Kanye West is a tough act to follow--unless you are a middle-aged couple slow dancing to tuba music. It's unlikely that anyone watching last month's Youth Inaugural...
Partisanship Is Good
Basic disputes between the two parties are not only inevitable--they're essential to a healthy society. Like most presidents, Barack Obama came to The White House hoping his unique gifts might overcome party divisions in Washington. And as with...
Perspectives
"America doesn't trust you anymore. I get a lot of money to put in banks. I don't have one single penny in any of your banks. Not one." Massachusetts Rep. Michael Capuano, chewing out eight Wall Street CEOs during their testimony on Capitol Hill...
Phoenix? More like A Cuckoo
If you thought Joaquin Phoenix's interview on David Letterman was weird, you should've seen his interview with us. Actually, you might one day. Joaquin had his entire morning of press for "Two Lovers"--supposedly his last movie--taped for a documentary...
Poof Goes the Purple Dream
Byline: Jonathan Alter The American primary system allows a handful of activist voters to determine who runs the country. Say sayonara to "kumbaya." Bipartisanship is all but dead in Washington. President Obama cut a deal to win passage of his...
Portrait of a Shadow
Byline: Scott Johnson He helped create and equip the Iraqi insurgency. U.S. forces tried for years to kill or capture him. Now he has a different mission: to destroy Al Qaeda in Iraq. The American operatives were openly skeptical when the sheik...
Promises, Promises
Byline: Joseph Epstein; Epstein is the author, most recently, of "Fred Astaire" (Yale University Press). Soaring expectations collide with harsh political realities. How Barack Obama looks from Chicagoland. On Tuesday, this past Nov. 4, I voted...
Teens, Nude Photos and the Law
Ask yourself: should the police be involved when tipsy teen girls e-mail their boyfriends naughty Valentine's Day pictures? Say you're a middle-school principal who confiscated a cell phone from a 14-year-old boy, only to discover it contains a...
The Boom from the Bottom
Byline: Jason Overdorf Isolated from world trends, India's aspiring middle will help it grow through the credit storm. Though it may not look it on the ground at times, India is one of the few bright spots in a global economy with decidedly dim...
The Curse of Cursive
Byline: Jessica Bennett Penmanship, like hieroglyphics and the IBM Selectric, has lost its purpose. Let's erase it for good. In all my years of school, there was only one time I cried in class. It was the first week of first grade--Mrs. Scougie's...
The Decline of the Petro-Czar
Byline: Rana Foroohar; With Owen Matthews in Moscow, Babak Pirouz in Tehran and Michael Miller in New York Plunging oil prices have created an unexpected diplomatic bright spot in the global recession by weakening unfriendly regimes. What a difference...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham He was home, in a way, and among friends. Last Thursday evening, standing before the 102nd Abraham Lincoln Association banquet in Springfield, Ill., President Obama recalled Lincoln's words on leaving the state capital for Washington:...
The Myths of the Recession
Byline: Barrett Sheridan; With Stefan Theil in BerlinWith in Berlin Remember "decoupling"? It was the notion that emerging economies had detached themselves from the developed world, and that Asian consumers could make up for falling demand in the...
The Secrets in Lincoln's DNA
Byline: Claudia Kalb Experts say it might be possible to extract bits of Lincoln's DNA, assemble a gene and then make a diagnosis. Come along with me, past all the bicentennial hoopla, to a quiet place north of the White House. Here, at the National...
The Usual Suspect
The link between stress and disease has been oversold. The truth about its effect on health. Walter Bradford Cannon did not strike people as someone interested in black magic. A world-famous physiologist, Cannon often wore three-piece suits in his...
We've Still Got Room to Spend
Byline: Zachary Karabell Those stories about a consumer debt crisis are overblown. It's become a mantra: American consumers have been living beyond their means, borrowing promiscuously, and now the bill is coming due. Having nearly drowned in...
What about My Stress?
A Harvard psychiatrist answers your questions about stress. Edmonton, Ky.: Do we build up resistance to stress? My job is stressful, but as the years go by I seem to handle stress better. I have had seven bypasses and have a pacemaker. Dr. Michael...
Where Every Vote Counts by Adam B. Kushner
Not for the first time, Israeli voters gave a firm mandate to -- none of their candidates. In the coming weeks, centrist Tzipi Livni and hawk Bibi Netanyahu will try to assemble a majority coalition and become prime minister. No matter who does it,...
Who Says Stress Is Bad for You?
Byline: Mary Carmichael It can be, but it can be good for you, too--a fact scientists tend to ignore and regular folks don't appreciate. If you aren't already paralyzed with stress from reading the financial news, here's a sure way to achieve...
Why Pundits Get Things Wrong
Byline: Sharon Begley The best predictor was fame: the more feted by the media, the worse a pundit's accuracy. Pointing out how often pundits' predictions are not only wrong but egregiously wrong--a 36,000 Dow! euphoric Iraqis welcoming American...