Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 25, June 21

And the Hits Keep Coming
Is there a 12-step group for people hooked on addiction literature? There should be, given the million little drug stories out there. The latest is about a literary agent turned crack fiend, but is his tale that different from--well, the rest? Match...
Blowback
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Evan Thomas The Obama administration faces a dilemma: how to battle Muslim extremists without creating more here at home. The car bomb was a dud. But if Faisal Shahzad had taken just a few more hours of lessons in the...
Classified-Info Crackdown
Byline: Michael Isikoff The Obama administration is quietly ratcheting up its campaign against national-security leaks with a series of moves that are surprising intelligence-community veterans. One recent example: a memo, signed by National Intelligence...
Death Becomes Them
Byline: Raina Kelley I swear, if anyone ever releases a photo of me taken after I'm dead, he should be prepared for a lifetime of paranormal activity--the Poltergeist kind. That said, I must admit I've looked at pictures of dead people myself. (Skip...
Don't Just 'Do Something'
Byline: Sharon Begley We must put science first in the gulf. Scientists are such spoilsports, always insisting on gathering data on the likely effects of a strategy before implementing it. Politicians are more inclined to just go for it, especially...
Faith in Facebook
Byline: Emily Gould I should have known that the blog, an anonymous diary of my personal life, was a bad idea. As a reporter for the gossip site Gawker, I spent my days deconstructing similar attempts at concealment. But I lulled myself into a false...
How Much Does a Gallon of Gas Cost?
Byline: Ezra Klein A whole lot more than you think. It seems like an easy question. You might ask if I mean premium or regular, and where in the country I'm buying. Beyond that, though, the price is displayed in giant numbers on most thoroughfares....
'I Don't'
Byline: Jessica Bennett and Jesse Ellison The case against marriage. Every year around this time, the envelopes begin to arrive. Embossed curlicues on thick-stock, cream-colored paper ask for "the pleasure of our company" at "the union of," "the...
Japan's Not-So-Prime Minister
Byline: Takashi Yokota and Yoshihiro Nagaoka What does Naoto Kan really believe? For better or worse, Japan's new prime minister has a reputation as a flip-flopper. Like the way he used to denounce the opposition Liberal Democratic Party for being...
Lightyears Ahead of Its Time
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh if you expect to have trouble letting go of your son when he heads off to college, perhaps there's solace in this: imagine how crummy his toys must feel. That's the premise behind Toy Story 3. Now that Andy is all grown up,...
Phone Fight!
Byline: Daniel Lyons It's Apple vs. Google in the battle over the future of computing. When Steve Jobs took the stage for his keynote address at Apple's annual developers conference last week, he had plenty to say about the new iPhonea4, calling...
Presidential Pony Show
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Obama needs to lead, not emote. I agree with virtually everyone out there who's complaining on camera and in print that our response to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has been just terrible. Except that by "our" I...
Primary Examples for Our Daughters
Byline: Jon Meacham As the father of two formidable daughters (one is 5, the other 2, but they already seem formidable to me), I loved the splendid evening female candidates had last Tuesday in primaries from South Carolina to Arkansas to California....
Reasoning Arizona
Byline: Karl Rove Why is Obama hyperventilating? President Obama is using the new Arizona immigration law to advance a central White House preoccupation: his reelection. At a town-hall meeting in Iowa last April, the president warned Hispanic-Americans...
Saint Sarah
Byline: Lisa Miller To white evangelical women, Sarah Palin is a modern-day prophet, preaching God, flag, and family--while remaking the religious right in her own image. Another memoirist might prefer to keep such matters private, but Sarah...
Starchitecture: A Modest Proposal
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan The trophy building is so over. Welcome to the era of design on a diet. In The Bilbao Effect, a minor satire that played off-Broadway in New York this spring, a world-famous architect named Erhardt Shlaminger is caught...
The Politics of Parsimony
Byline: Daniel Gross How politicians worldwide are buying votes by cutting spending. If British voters thought they had replaced the dour visage of Labour Prime Minister Gordon Brown with an optimistic one in fresh-faced Tory David Cameron, they...
The Reluctant Recovery
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson How gloom is hobbling the economy. It's psychology, stupid. Not since World War II has an economic recovery been so hobbled by poor confidence. Every recession leaves a legacy of anxiety and uncertainty. But the present...
The Richer Sex
Byline: Rana Foroohar Companies had better cater to women. Anyone who's seen the new Sex and the City movie (not something I necessarily encourage) may have noticed a subtle shift in the girls' accessories. No, not the evolution from Manolos...
Understanding Charter Schools
Byline: Evan Thomas and Pat Wingert Innovative charter schools outperform bureaucratic public schools every time--right? WRONG. Some 15 of NEWSWEEK's top 100 public high schools are charter schools. Since charter schools amount to only about...