Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 09, August 30

A 'Fat Cat' Strikes Back
Byline: Jonathan Alter President Obama and the business community have been at odds for months. But in July the chairman and cofounder of the Blackstone Group, one of the world's largest private-equity firms, amped up the rhetoric. Stephen Schwarzman--the...
Be More like Ike
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Republicans should heed Robert Gates. Robert Gates's latest efforts at reforming the Pentagon are modest. He is not trying to cut the actual defense budget; he merely wants to increase efficiency while reducing bureaucracy,...
Borderline Dumb
Byline: Howard Fineman The GOP's shortsighted immigration play. If we had any sense, the fall elections would be about just one thing: the economy. But we do not have any sense. We are facing what Wall Street would call the "triple witching hour."...
Does Anything Happen in August?
Byline: Number 17, NYC and Raina Kelley Thank God for JetBlue's Steven Slater for injecting a little joy in an otherwise sleepy month. But it's a complete fallacy that nothing ever happens in August. Just because half of America and most of Europe...
Don't Wait for a Thank You, Mr. President
Byline: Jon Meacham Feeling underappreciated is among the most common of human emotions. From time to time we all indulge in at least a bit of self-pity. The sense that the world does not understand our greatness or our gifts can manifest itself...
Emmy Roundtable: Party of Six
Byline: Joshua Alston and Marc Peyser When Bryan Cranston, 54, was accepting the first of two Emmys he's won for Breaking Bad, the crowning achievement of a storied career, Chris Colfer (Glee) was an 18-year-old unknown. Yet here they are, laughing...
Fight Fire with Funny
Byline: Jarret Brachman Every night I sit on my couch and search the Web for new Qaeda videos. My work--first as director of research at West Point's Combating Terrorism Center and now as a private scholar and security consultant--has long required...
From the Ashes
Byline: James Manyika, Susan Lund, and Byron Auguste The most dynamic economies rely on creative destruction to grow. As the world continues to recover from the Great Recession, governments and businesses are focused on how to spur economic growth....
Go to the Head of the Class
Byline: Katie Baker Running a country can be a thankless job, but these 10 leaders have managed to win serious respect. The Leader Other Leaders Love: Manmohan Singh The prime minister, a sophisticated former economist, played the key role...
How to Close the Achievement Gap
Byline: Mona Mourshed and Fenton Whelan The world's best schools offer important lessons about what works. All over the world, your chances of success in school and life depend more on your family circumstances than on any other factor. By age...
It's Just What the Doctor Ordered
Byline: T. R. Reid Japan shows how it's done: keep quality up, costs down, and M.D.s on board. To gauge a health-care system's success, it's standard to consider three points: quality, coverage, and cost. On all three measures, Japan stands at...
Lost in Electronica
Byline: George F. Will The costs of 'the chaos of constant connection.' Can trout be bored? Can dolphins or apes? Are they neurologically complex enough to experience boredom? What might boredom mean to such creatures? Humanity can boast that...
Mad Women, Not Mad Men
Byline: Julia Baird On TV, the seeds of a revolution. In October 1959, the golden-haired poet Sylvia Plath dreamed that Marilyn Monroe appeared to her, like a "fairy godmother," and gave her a manicure, hairdressing advice, and an invitation...
Overall Ranking
People practically anywhere in the world will find something to love--and something to hate--about NEWSWEEK's first-ever list of the world's Best Countries. In any case, we hope it will be at least a starting point to examine a number of important...
Pulling Hands out of the Till
Byline: Stefan Theil The best countries keep public and private sector graft in check. For every success in fighting corruption, there's a fresh backslide. Although the U.S. and Europe have made spectacular gains in cracking down on corporate...
The Best Countries in the World
Byline: Rana Foroohar Forget the world cup, the Olympics, even the miss universe pageant. These are the globe's true national champions. Warren Buffett likes to say that anything good that's ever happened to him can be traced back to the fact...
The Problem with Presidents
Byline: Kishore Mahbubani We need global, not just national, leaders. Mao Zedong was right. we should always focus on the primary, not secondary, contradictions. And right now, our primary global contradiction is painfully obvious: the biggest...
The Professional Class Flees Russia
Byline: Owen Matthews A new generation of exiles is fleeing Russia, and they're well-heeled and educated. Businesspeople, lawyers, accountants, and bankers say they're leaving the country after being robbed and threatened with false arrest by crooked...
The Real Tragedy of Gitmo
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Why Khadr shouldn't be tried there. When Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. announced last fall that he planned to try Khalid Sheikh Mohammed in a civilian court in New York, he was met with a firestorm of criticism. Despite...
The World's Real Winners
Byline: Karen Fragala Smith Statistics can measure only so much. To enjoy life's more particular pleasures, move to one of these lucky nations. Best Place to Fly a Kite India Flying a kite from the roof is part of everyday life in India....
Vs
Byline: R. M. Schneiderman Which national models fare better? United States vs. France France and the United States have long held different ideas of how to balance economic growth with security. And as the crisis unfolded on Wall Street,...
We're Mad as Hell
Byline: Daniel Gross And we're not going to take this! On Aug. 9, Jetblue flight attendant Steven Slater gave new meaning to the term "exit interview." Angered at the boorish behavior of a passenger, he picked up the intercom, loudly submitted...
We're No. 11!
Byline: Michael Hirsh America may be declining, but don't despair. Like the summer heat, fear of America's impending decline is weighing on Washington these days. Has the United States lost its oomph as a superpower? Even President Obama isn't...
With Best Countries like These-
Byline: Andrei Codrescu Why cold, dark, small, and depressive nations top the rankings. I used to eat at a Scandinavian cafeteria in San Francisco that called itself a "smorgasbord" and advertised its reindeer meatballs over pasta as superior...
Your Pass to Good Government
Byline: Mac Margolis Skip the lines, forget about bribes. E-gov gives anyone with a web connection direct access to public services. Had Franz Kafka been born in 21st-century Tallinn, Estonia, instead of 19th-century Prague, some of the gems...