Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 07, August 15

8 Ways to Fix Our Politics
Byline: Andrew Romano From California to Capitol Hill, America's political system is an unholy mess. Here's a pathway to less partisanship and more problem solving. THE PROBLEM Gerrymandering (the redrawing of congressional districts by the...
America's Workers Get Stiffed Again
Byline: Jennifer M. Granholm and Daniel G. Mulhern The small-government, tax-cut-only approach is helping our competitors win the global race for jobs. Jobs aren't scarce. and manufacturing jobs aren't disappearing. No, really: there are more...
Anthony Pellicano: The Hollywood Phone Hacker Breaks His Silence
Byline: Christine Pelisek Long before the Murdoch empire's illegal high jinks, he was the private eye that stars feared (and used) most. Now locked up in a federal prison, he comes clean on spying for Schwarzenegger, clearing Cruise's name--...
Escape from the Asylum
Byline: Jane Harman Watching the debt crisis, a former congresswoman yearns for a lost bipartisan era. Three months into my new job as president and CEO of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, I watch the dysfunction in Congress...
Global New Deal
Byline: Gordon Brown Gordon Brown's manifesto to save America--and the world economy. Weeks of rhetoric and political maneuvering over the debt ceiling may have been resolved, but the larger question remains unanswered: how will America revive...
Gloria Steinem Still Wants More
Byline: Nancy Hass She's spent decades on the front lines of the fight for women's rights. But America's leading feminist says this is no time to settle. Mention the name Gloria Steinem to many women under 30, and if there is a flash of recognition...
Hawa's Haven
Byline: Eliza Griswold On the battered veranda of Dr. Hawa Abdi's family farm outside Mogadishu, she and her nurses lined up what look like dusty bundles. They were, upon closer inspection, newborn babies failing to thrive. The veranda, roofless...
Interview : Alan Simpson Is 'Disgusted' with the Debt Deal
Byline: John Avlon The former senator blasts off about Washington's incompetence. What do you think about the debt-ceiling deal? It's a start, and that's all you can charitably say. It really doesn't get to the big numbers. It doesn't get to...
My Favorite Mistake
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Tim Gunn on sabotaging his last great chance at love. The only real relationship I've ever had ended badly after nine years. The hurt I felt after the divorce was the most painful experience I've ever had. My biggest mistake...
Not a Very Nice Man
Byline: Ivana Lowell Ivana Lowell, whose mother married freud, recalls his dark side. I asked my mother why she had never had any children with Lucian Freud. He had been her first husband, was intelligent, talented, and handsome--all qualities...
Painter in the Flesh
Byline: Simon Schama Eye of the hawk: Lucian Freud was a profoundly confrontational artist, assaulting his subjects in paint. When Lucian Freud, who died on July 20 at 88, was starting out as a painter in the late 1940s, he would bring sparrow...
Pellicano Target: 'I Was Scared Every Day'
Byline: Kate Aurthur Threatened and phone-tapped, journalist Anita Busch picks up the pieces. Anita Busch would like her life back. Nothing has been the same for her since June 20, 2002, when she found her car vandalized--someone had damaged...
Personal Finance : How to Protect Your Portfolio from Politics
Byline: Jean Chatzky Washington's shoddy compromise sent the stock market plunging last week. What's an investor to do? All the dithering about raising the debt ceiling sent the stock market tumbling last week, as investors faced down the prospect...
Revenge of the Nerds
Byline: Marlow Stern Jesse Eisenberg and Aziz Ansari are the new tough guys. Back in the 1980s, when cowboys didn't commingle with aliens and Superman was still a U.S. citizen, the buddy action-comedy was born. The decidedly American subgenre...
'Something about Her Tells Me to Follow Her'
Byline: Lois Romano Why Michele Bachmann is riding high going into Iowa. Barreling past Iowa's iconic cornfields aboard a blue campaign bus, Michele Bachmann tries to explain the uncanny political force that has catapulted her from a backbencher...
The Casual-Friday Campaign
Byline: Robin Givhan Why the 2012 presidential race is banishing suit-and-tie politics. In the pursuit of the presidency, as candidates make use of every form of communication--including style and its nuanced inflections--the earnest rolling...
The Untransformational President
Byline: Michael Tomasky Barack Obama hoped to elevate American politics. Instead, our politics may destroy his presidency. Why isn't Barack Obama tougher? During the week that he signed a debt deal in which the Republicans took him to the cleaners,...
Under Siege in Somalia
Byline: Dr. Hawa Abdi With Sarah J. Robbins A people plagued by catastrophic famine--and the tyranny of Islamist fanatics. Hawa Abdi is an obstetrician and gynecologist who in 1983 established a one-room clinic near Somalia's capital, Mogadishu....
Washington Proves the Communists Right
Byline: Niall Ferguson Whatever the rating agencies say, many in China believe the U.S. is no longer creditworthy. Xian, China--viewed from inside the Beltway, the passage of legislation to raise the federal debt ceiling was a triumph for democracy....
Why It's Smart to Be Bilingual
Byline: Casey Schwartz The brain's real super-food may be learning new languages. On a sweltering August morning, in a classroom overlooking New York's Hudson River, a group of 3-year-olds are rolling sticky rice balls in chocolate sprinkles,...