Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 159, No. 04, January 23

Before Karen Met Rick
Byline: Nancy Hass The GOP contender's hard-core pro-life wife once dated an abortion provider. Nancy Hass on their time together. Karen Santorum, the ultra-pro-life wife and mother of seven home-schooled children, has been the perfect complement...
Big, Bigger, Biggest
Byline: Nick Summers The once-scrappy network has swelled to massive size. But as the highest-priced network on cable TV, is the sports behemoth too big for its own good? By Nick Summers "Steeeeeeeeeeeeeeeve!" It's Dec. 19, 90 minutes before...
Can't Someone Tell Geert Wilders to Stop His Anti-Muslim Diatribes before Somebody Gets Hurt?
Byline: Christopher Dickey A couple of years ago, a billboard appeared outside Columbia, S.C., looming above Interstate 26. Beady eyes stared out from a black balaclava emblazoned with an inscription from the Quran--clearly the eyes were meant to...
Colin Myler Editor in Chief, New York Daily News
Byline: Lloyd Grove A top Murdoch star dumps on Rupe's son, then defects to a rival. Fleet Street on the Hudson. The media mob's eyebrows were collectively elevated on Jan. 4, when Daily News owner Mortimer B. Zuckerman named Englishman Colin...
Crash-Testing the Plug-In
Byline: Joanne Lipman Ford CEO Alan Mulally on the pitfalls of his company's newest car. For more than three years, President Obama has been singing the praises of electric cars. He's repeatedly called for 1 million plug-in and hybrid vehicles...
Google Gets Grumpy
Byline: Dan Lyons Tech giants square off against Congress. What would the world be like without the Web? We almost had an answer, if only for a day. To protest Congress's consideration of the onerous Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)--which would...
My Favorite Mistake: Barbara Corcoran
Real-estate mogul Barbara Corcoran on ticking off the 'nun from hell.' The best mistake I ever made was believing that I was stupid. It was a childhood thing, but it played out big-time as an adult. It scorned me the rest of my life--in a good way....
No Downers in 'Downton'
Byline: Simon Schama Why have Americans fallen for a show that serves up snobbery by the bucketful? There are many things wrong with the Republic in 2012, but when historians come to write its chronicle they will notice that the country was gripped...
President Obama Braces for the GOP
Byline: Tina Brown As the republican candidates reach their O.K. Corral, the president prepares for the next gunfight. Barack Obama must be relieved to see the Republican posse that was galloping after him suddenly turn on itself in ways that...
Rich America, Poor America
Byline: Niall Ferguson GOP candidates denounce talk of inequality as 'class warfare.' But a conservative historian believes the economic divide is real-and offers a solution. There are "two nations; between whom there is no intercourse and no...
Science: The Age of Immorality
Byline: Casey Schwartz When it comes to deciding what's right or wrong, we're far more emotional than rational. The lurid headlines of the past year--cheating politicos, lying coaches--are enough to make you think morality is a thing of the past....
See Spots Sell
Byline: Blake Gopnik Has Damien Hirst made the largest painting in the world? Let the debate begin. Some paintings are small enough that you can take in their subject and tiniest details at once. Bigger ones make you do a little dance, stepping...
She'll Rough You Up
Byline: Marlow Stern Move over, Angelina. Gina Carano is the latest female warrior to grace the big screen. Ewan McGregor is shaking in his boots. "You shouldn't think of her as being a woman--that would be a mistake," he warns in Steven Soderbergh's...
The Butchers of Nigeria
Byline: Wole Soyinka How a corrupt nation bred Boko Haram, the Islamic sect terrorizing the country's Christians. Over the past year, Nigeria's homegrown terror group Boko Haram has escalated its deadly attacks against Christian and government...
The Long Game
Byline: Andrew Sullivan The right calls him a socialist, the left says he sucks up to Wall Street, and independents think he's a wimp. Andrew Sullivan on how the president may just end up outsmarting them all. You hear it everywhere. Democrats...
The Minigarch Next Door
Byline: Rebecca Dana A 22-year-old just bought Manhattan's priciest pad. Meet the Russians taking America by storm. Say what you will about Ekaterina Rybolovleva, if you can say anything at all. At least the woman knows how to make an entrance....
The Perils of Plastic Man
Byline: Paul Begala Mitt Romney lunges rightward. Is he moving in the wrong direction? Unlike some of my right-wing friends, I actually believe in evolution. The shorthand for Darwin's Law is not "Only the Strong Survive," as a moronic coach...
The Secret of South Carolina
Byline: David Frum South Carolina should be the perfect Tea Party state: Southern, conservative, lots of evangelicals, lots of retirees. Yet historically, this state has served as the GOP establishment's "firewall." True to form, when it votes...
The World on a Page
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Gay spies, bankers' wives, banned underwear ... and an independent Scotland. Political put-down of the week: "Viktator," chanted by crowds in Budapest protesting the increasingly obnoxious government of Prime Minister...
When All Is Taken Away
Byline: Michael Daly Two tragedies, one message of love, and 'acts of pure kindness.' What does it take to survive the brutal death of one's children? How can a parent endure? After a funeral unlike any witnessed at the century-old St. Thomas...
Writer's Block in Cairo
Byline: Mike Giglio Can the Arab Spring's Revolutionary Fervor translate into great art? The cosmetics shop, situated inside a mall on the outskirts of Cairo, is called Kamanana. The word is plastered above the doorway on a garish yellow sign....