Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 159, No. 14, April 2

A Brand Called Damien Hirst
Byline: Blake Gopnik Behind an elegant door on a posh street in London, Damien Hirst, one of the world's greatest artists, sits surrounded by treasures: an Andy Warhol "Electric Chair" is propped on a shelf; a major Francis Bacon hangs over the...
A Tale of Two Romneys
Byline: David Frum If Austin Powers were unfrozen in 2012 from his 1960s cryogenic freeze, there's one political headline that would make him feel immediately at home: "Romney Struggles With Republican Party Conservatives." In 1966, George Romney...
China's Great Leap Backward
Byline: Niall Ferguson "To understand China you have to think in generations," my Chinese friend explained. "And the key is that after 2012 the Cultural Revolution generation will be in charge." While antiwar protesters clashed with the National...
Christopher Buckley on One Too Many
Byline: Christopher Buckley In one of the many scenes in "Mad Men" having to do with drinking, Roger Sterling, played to perfection by John Slattery, goes mano a mano with Don Draper over oysters and Martinis. Roger instructs the waiter, "And don't...
Click This Ad Already!
Byline: Nick Summers To be honest, it's not an ad that puts you in the mood for a burrito. The spot for Chipotle Mexican Grill starts bleak and gets bleaker: the story of a farmer who becomes Big Agriculture, maltreating his pigs and polluting...
Don't Bank on It
Byline: Rob Cox In a sententious harrumph, a midlevel Goldman Sachs banker stormed out of Wall Street's leading investment bank last week by publishing a critique in The New York Times of his now former employer. Greg Smith accused Goldman chief...
Flower Power
Byline: Michael Daly On an August day in 1964, a freckle-faced 2-year-old toddled into a flower patch in upper Manhattan wearing a top with buttons in the shape of teddy bears. What she had no way of knowing was that she was about to be the star...
'Mad Men' and Working Women
Byline: Eleanor Clift t's a rainy morning in Los Angeles, and Elisabeth Moss, who plays Peggy in the television series Mad Men, is standing outside the stage door smoking. On the set the actors are restricted to herbal cigarettes, which is why she...
Meet the New Don Drapers
A hidden book, a talking stain--how 10 creative geniuses make the digital age work for them. David Droga, Droga5 Droga (pictured at left) has won more Cannes Lions awards than anyone else in advertising. The Australian's work shows an uncanny...
More Attack Ads, Please
Byline: Paul Begala In the basement of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington there is a framed picture of Harry Truman. Behind that picture there is one loose brick. Push the brick and a secret panel opens to a staircase....
My Kool Acid Test
Byline: Marc Lewis For most of my late teens and 20s, I tried to rewire my brain by ingesting every drug I could lay my hands on. Which probably helps explain why I became a neuroscientist, studying the brain changes brought about by drugs and addiction....
My Lai Revisited
Byline: Stephen L. Carter On March 16, 1968, two platoons of American soldiers arrived at the hamlet of My Lai, in the district known as Son My in what was then South Vietnam. The men were from Charlie Company of the First Battalion, 20th Infantry...
Newsmakers
Voice From the Grave: Whitney Houston couldn't save herself, but she sure saved Oprah. The mogul's interview with Houston's grieving family helped resuscitate OWN, Winfrey's flagging cable network. Oprah was at her talk-show best, whipping the affair...
Ob-la-Di, Ob-la-Da, Bras Go On
Byline: Robin Givhan From the moment Mad Men debuted, the fashion industry was smitten with the tightly coiled restraint inherent in early-'60s attire--a time when young women mimicked the starched orderliness of their mothers. It was an era poised...
Read All about It
Byline: Malcolm Jones and LUcas Wittmann How does the New York Times bestseller list of March 1966 match up with today's? NONFICTION 1. 1966: In Cold Blood. By Truman Capote. 2012: American Sniper. By Chris Kyle with Scott McEwan....
The Cardinal Sees Red
Byline: Peter J. Boyer Just inside the heavy front door of the 19th-century neo-Gothic mansion at 452 Madison Avenue, the official residence of Timothy M. Dolan, archbishop of New York, rests a telling clue about the resident's personality. Perched...
The Closeted Columnist
Byline: John Lithgow "Now, wait a second, Mr. President!" The words pop like firecrackers in the middle of the recorded conversation. This was Joseph Alsop talking on the phone to Lyndon Johnson on Nov. 25, 1963, days after JFK's assassination had...
The Periscope
Byline: Tina Brown American Pipeline Northern Exposure It is a truth universally acknowledged that Canada is a placid place--acknowledged, that is, by all but Dick Cheney. Fearing a rowdy reception by local demonstrators, the former vice president...
The Voice of God on Tv
Byline: Douglas Brinkley If you turned the TV dial to CBS in 1965, this is what you'd likely see: Walter Cronkite. From the cramped CBS newsroom in New York, the pipe-puffing Cronkite liked feeling in control of the news organization, typing...
Tina Brown on This Special Issue
Byline: Tina Brown Welcome to Newsweek's time machine. To celebrate the start of a fifth season of the TV show "Mad Men," set in a Madison Avenue ad agency in the 1960s, we've retrofitted this issue to the restrained design style of those times....
Top of the Week
The Endless Primary This week, the likely GOP winner will be--nobody! On March 20 Republicans vote in Illinois, where polls have given Mitt Romney a comfy lead. On March 24 it's Louisiana; Rick Santorum just won two primaries in the South. Newt...
'We Lost the Cabin'
Byline: Clive Irving At 10:56 p.m. on April 1 last year, Southwest Airlines Flight 812, en route from Phoenix to Sacramento with 118 passengers aboard, was completing its climb to its cruise altitude of 36,000 feet. An air-traffic controller at...