Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 11

Beautiful Loser: In 'American Splendor,' Paul Giamatti Finally Gets His Star Moment Playing an Ordinary Guy
Byline: Devin Gordon Life is sweet when you're "that guy in that movie." The money is good. The hours are nothing. And you get all the best lines in the script. You can do an interview in dumpy jeans and an old T shirt because, really, who cares?...
Beware the Puppet Masters: All Those Groups and Leaders Who Lived through Saddam Hussein's Reign Cannot Be Pleased to See the Exiles Being Foisted atop the Country
Byline: Fareed Zakaria "For an Iraqi family, no other choice," read the Washington Post's front-page headline last Friday. The story is of an Iraqi father whose village forced him to kill his son. The son had allegedly helped the American Army....
Exclusive: Behind Al Qaeda's New Hijacking Strategy
Byline: Mark Hosenball One unpublicized reason the Bush administration issued last week's warning about new Qaeda hijacking threats is that U.S. intelligence acquired evidence from terrorist hideouts showing how Osama bin Laden's operatives would...
Hiking: Just Lighten Up
Byline: Paul Tolme You call this "roughing it"? Today's hiking and camping gear is much lighter and more luxurious than ever. With tents that have built-in air mattresses and backpacks that blast your favorite MP3s--no wonder a record number of...
Men at Overwork: The Good News Is We're More Productive. the Bad News? They Don't Need as Many of Us
Byline: Brad Stone IBM's year-old, $2.5 billion computer-chip plant in East Fishkill, N.Y., is a manufacturing marvel. Three hundred robotic tools, six miles of networking cable and more computing power than NASA uses to launch the space shuttle...
Oiling the Relationship: The Bottom Line: The Bushies and Saudis Need Each Other
Byline: Christopher Dickey "Hogwash!" Prince Saud al-Faisal erupted. Saudi Arabia's U.S.-educated foreign minister was flying home from a tough trip to Washington. He had endured congressional accusations of direct links between Saudi intelligence...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Newsday, New York Post, The Hill, BBC, New York Post (2), New York Times, CNN, Reuters, New York Post, Associated Press (2), Chicago Sun-Times "I believe a marriage is between a man and a woman." President...
Queen for a Day: Bravo's 'Queer Eye for the Straight Guy' Has Exploded. It's a Makeover Takeover
Byline: Devin Gordon and B. J. Sigesmund Last Tuesday's episode of "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy" made this gay-straight alliance cry --twice. The first time came minutes into Jersey City urban cowboy John B.'s makeover (mission: help him propose...
Saved by the Kindness of a Virtual Stranger: My Wife Needed a Kidney, but We Didn't Know How to Ask Friends for Help. Turns out We Didn't Have To
Byline: Mark S. Zelermyer I grew up thinking that if miracles existed at all, they were larger than life, spectacular acts that suspended the laws of nature (think Cecil B. DeMille's "The Ten Commandments"). Even as an adult, whenever I read about...
School Days with a Qaeda Suspect: Long Ago, NEWSWEEK Correspondent Richard Wolffe Went to School with Moazzam Begg. Now He's Gone Back to Find out Where Begg Went Bad
Byline: Richard Wolffe He stood out from the rest of our class for being so small and frail. Sure, he could run like the wind, which kept him out of trouble. And he won friends with his bright, wide smile. Yet he was also awkward, easily teased...
Secondhand Prose: Used Books Are a Bleak Bookselling Scene's Bright Spot
Byline: Malcolm Jones Some people check stock quotations to see how their investments are doing. I look at used-book prices online. I've never been a collector, but over the years a few novels that I've hung on to simply because I liked them have,...
Shredding the Envelope: 'American Splendor' Is the Anti Summer Movie: A Bent Biopic That Trashes Every Hollywood Convention-And Then Some
Byline: David Ansen Arriving not a moment too soon, "American Splendor" is a glorious rebuke to all this summer's recycled, effects-ridden, laboriously "fun" Hollywood disappointments piled along the wayside like so many crashed cars. An unclassifiable...
Springing Eternal: He Was a Joker, a Patriot, a Master Entertainer, an Icon. Remembering Bob Hope, 1903-2003
Byline: NEWSWEEK's Jack Kroll wrote this tribute to Bob Hope before his own death in 2000. Bob Hope probably rattled off a gag for every minute in the 20th century. Speed was his comic essence--he was once clocked at seven jokes a minute--as if...
Technology: Dial with Caution
Byline: Meredith Sadin Capturing that special moment on film isn't easy. And if that image is a celebrity sweating on the treadmill next to you at the gym, it's just gotten a lot harder. Gyms are banning increasingly popular camera phones for fear...
Terror, Iraq and 'Full Security': Fresh from Meeting President Bush at the White House, Ariel Sharon Talks about Settlements, Weapons of Mass Destruction and What It Will Take to Make Peace
Byline: Lally Weymouth Israel's prime minister Ariel Sharon came to Washington last week for his eighth White House visit with President Bush. Bush is anxious to promote the so-called Roadmap to peace in the Middle East, which so far has produced...
The Doctor in His Life: For a Possible Future First Lady, Dr. Judith Steinberg Has a Novel Approach to Politics. She Simply Won't Be Bothered
Byline: Eleanor Clift The first surprise about Dr. Judith Steinberg is how she answers the phone: Judy Dean, she says brightly. Judy Dean? Is this the candidate's wife who has staked out an independent life, declining the traditional role of appendage...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker If anyone knows democrats, it's Jonathan Alter. As a kid growing up in Chicago, he studied the Daley machine, and his mother was the first woman elected to county office in Cook County. He was an usher at the 1976 Democratic...
The Fashion Policeman
Byline: Marc Peyser Carson Kressley is fabulous. No, really, it's part of his job description. As one of the five gay men on Bravo's "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy," Kressley cruises the airwaves making over hetero fashion victims in his own image....
The Left's Mr. Right? IN YOUR FACE: His Willingness to Go after Bush on Iraq Thrilled Long-Suffering Liberals. and His Unexpected Success at Fund-Raising Gave Him Crucial Momentum. but Is Howard Dean the Democrats' Path Back to Power-Or a Recipe for Another 49-State Defeat?
Byline: Jonathan Alter Consider two voters motivated to contribute to Howard Dean's presidential campaign: one is a supporter; the other is a... "supporter." Kevin O'Connor, a 53-year-old investment banker, went to Denver's first gathering of Dean...
The Myth of 'Big Media': The Explosion of Choices Means Almost Everyone Is Likely to Be Offended by Something. A Lot of This Hostility Has Focused on the FCC Ownership Rules
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Our public debates often fly off into the wild blue yonder of fantasy. So it's been with the Federal Communications Commission's new media-ownership rules. We're told that, unless the FCC's decision is reversed, it will...
The Secret Law of Refinancing: Step Right Up for a Tour of Refi World, a Puzzling Place Where Something as Basic as the Law of Supply and Demand Doesn't Apply
Byline: Allan Sloan Isn't refinancing your mortgage fun? No wonder it became one of America's favorite indoor activities. When rates were falling, which they did for years, people kept calling their mortgage brokers to get a lower rate. The combination...
'They'll Say Anything': Dean Whacks the Bush White House, Scolds His Democratic Opponents and Talks Bluntly about Deficits, Taxes and Gays
He may be the left's hero, but Howard Dean doesn't fit neatly into the political pegboard. He spoke out--on the Democrats' weaknesses, the thorny issue of gay marriage and his own now legendary temperament--in conversations with NEWSWEEK last week....
Transition: Sam Phillips
Byline: David Gates Sam Phillips must have known 50 years ago that every paper in the world would run his obituary, and that every headline would say WHO DISCOVERED ELVIS. He was intensely proud of that, but (as he always told people, in his nonstop...