Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 28

Alito: New (Old) Attack Plan
Byline: Martha Brant The ammunition that the left had been looking for against Judge Samuel Alito came from an unexpected source last week: the conservative newspaper The Washington Times. The paper cited a 1985 job application in which Alito proclaimed...
And No Sticky Mess; Taking Kids' Birthday Parties out of the House
Byline: Ben Whitford Behind the faded storefront of the Closter, N.J., branch of Sandy Deck's Parties, Jack Naidrich turned 4 years old in style. Under the watchful eye of professional party hostess Eugenne Buenconsejo, Jack and a dozen friends...
Awards: And the Nom Goes To
Byline: Sean Smith If you want to win an Oscar for best actor this year, you're too late. Only five men get nominated, and four of those slots may already be taken. With 10 weeks to go until the nominations are announced, the fight for that fifth...
Bush at the Tipping Point; A Hawkish Democrat Calls for an Iraq Withdrawal, Setting off a Bitter Fight in Washington over How, and When, the Troops Should Come Home
Byline: Howard Fineman (With Richard Wolffe, Holly Bailey and John Barry) As friends describe it, Rep. Jack Murtha of Pennsylvania had been searching his soul for months, seeking guidance on what to do in Congress about Iraq. "I think he was going...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Many homeowners, who make (or expect) big profits when they sell, are just now catching on to the rules for reporting taxable gains. Some are amazed to learn that their gains come tax-free. Others find themselves taxed...
Child Prodigy
What's this year's toy story? They've already got a chest full of Elmos and Doras, ponies and Pac-Man. Why not try one of these more innovative playthings? It'll at least earn you points for creativity, which--in the world of child's play--ranks right...
Evolution of a Scientist; He Had Planned to Enter the Ministry, but His Discoveries on a Fateful Voyage 170 Years Ago Shook His Faith and Changed Our Conception of the Origins of Life
Byline: Jerry Adler (With Anne Underwood and William Lee Adams Graphic by Josh Ulick) On a December night in 1831, HMS Beagle, on a mission to chart the coast of South America, sailed from Plymouth, England, straight into the 21st century. Onboard...
First Ladies, in the Truest Sense; the Record for Female Representation Is Held by Rwanda, with Women Making Up 49 Percent of Its Lower House. the United States Ranks 67th
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) Sometimes the most important stories in the world don't get much attention because they're powerful but slow trends that can't be easily covered. They provide no single great...
Five Star Songwriters on Lennon
Byline: All the singers in this series spoke to Jac Chebatoris Dave Matthews On...'Imagine' Very often, songs of protest or songs that have some sort of social message are just dated and unlistenable. They're earnest--and they're bulls--t. But...
Hate on Campus; the University of Virginia Rallies against Racism
Byline: Daren Briscoe and Evan Thomas It is the most beautiful and most sacred part of "the Grounds," as the University of Virginia calls its campus. In a white-columned gallery along the "Lawn" are arrayed 104 rooms reserved for the best and brightest...
Holiday Countdown
Byline: Raina Kelley The reason we loved holidays is kids isn't just because we got all those presents. It's because we didn't have to do anything! Children don't have to stay up writing cards while baking 12 dozen cookies for 13 different social...
Intel: Iran Won't Need an Exit Strategy; Top Iraqi Officials Hammer out a Memorandum of Understanding in Tehran-And Take America's Ambassador in Baghdad by Surprise
Byline: Scott Johnson and Michael Hirsh (With Owen Matthews in Maysan) Confrontations don't seem to bother Mowaffaq al-Rubaie. After Saddam Hussein was found hiding in a rathole in late 2003, Rubaie was the only senior Iraqi official to call the...
It Was a Dark and Stormy Night
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan There's plenty of fog and gloom and ominous music in "The Woman in White," based on the classic Victorian thriller, but the fear factor, I'm afraid, is zilch. The first full-blown Andrew Lloyd Webber musical to open on...
Jazz: Pictures That Swing
Byline: Malcolm Jones In 1960 William Claxton took the road trip of his dreams. A West Coast photographer already well known for his photos of jazz musicians, Claxton was asked by German writer Joachim Berendt to document a cross-country search...
Leak Investigation: For Libby and Rove, Legal Woes-And Bills
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Holly Bailey As special counsel Patrick Fitzgerald continues his probe into the CIA leak affair, the probe is taking an escalating financial toll. I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby, the indicted former vice presidential chief...
Lennon Lives; 25 YEARS Ago, His Tragic Death Launched an Endless Season of Mourning, along with Decades' Worth of Turmoil and Infighting among His Survivors. the Story of One Beatle's Afterlife
Byline: Jeff Giles (With Jac Chebatoris, George Lyle and Stephen Saito) Even 25 years later, the details of his death come rushing back, like a flock of dark birds. It is early December in Manhattan. Shortly before 11 p.m. He's just turned 40, and...
Lists: Tweaking Baseball's Top 100
Byline: Mark Starr When Sporting News issued "Baseball's 100 Greatest Players" in 1998, the book was a home run with fans who love the debate as much as the game. Its editors insist that the decision to update the list only seven years later was...
Living on the Edge; Photographer Jan Grarup Chronicles Resilience and Doom in the Quake Zone
Byline: Photographs by Jan Grarup for NEWSWEEK On Oct. 8, an earthquake of 7.6 magnitude shook one of the more remote regions of the world. Tens of thousands of people were immediately crushed to death by falling debris. Thousands more died later...
Looking for A Way out; Instead of Cut-and-Run versus More-of-the-Same We Need a Few Imaginative "Third Way" Alternatives
Byline: Jonathan Alter President Kennedy once sent a pair of underlings to Vietnam and asked them to report back. Their descriptions of the progress of the war were so at odds that Kennedy asked, "Did you two gentlemen visit the same country?" That's...
Mario Batali Inc
Byline: Ben Whitford And Nicki Gostin (With Tara Weingarten in Los Angeles) Los Angeles is a city awash in buzz. but even the glitterati need to eat. And among the foodies, for whom where you get the next meal had better be as exciting as the next...
Newsmakers
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh, Jac Chebatoris Rosario Dawson Rosario Dawson plays Mimi in the film version of "Rent." She spoke to NEWSWEEK's Ramin Setoodeh. I've had the song "Light My Candle" stuck in my head all week. Yeah, it's a good boy-meets-girl...
No, It's Not the New Napster; BitTorrent's Creator Says He's Building a Business, Not a Pirate Network
Byline: Steven Levy Bram Cohen estimates that a third of all Internet bandwidth these days is tied up in his file-distribution program called BitTorrent. If that's right, the program that the 30-year-old New York native (now living in the Bay Area)...
Personal History: The 11 Moments That Made the Man; Chance and Adversity Forged Lennon's Voice and Vision
Byline: Andrew Romano 1. Spring 1956: John, 15, catches a radio broadcast of Elvis Presley's "Heartbreak Hotel." "When I heard it," he says later, "it was the end for me." 2. July 6, 1957: At a local church party, John leads his first band, the...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, AP, USA Today, New York Times, AP, New York Times, The Washington Post, AP "It's time to bring them home." Pennsylvania Rep. John Murtha, a...
Professor in Your Pocket; Now Course Casting Lets College Students Skip Classes and Download Lectures onto Their iPods. Biology Rocks! but Some Parents Just Don't Understand
Byline: Peg Tyre When Duke University junior Eddy Leal took a research trip to Puerto Rico recently and missed his macroeconomics lecture, he didn't sweat it. The lecture is usually attended by about 75 students, so his professor was unlikely to...
Sex, Drugs and Hope; SSRIs Are a Potent Weapon against Depression, but Sexual Side Effects Scare off Patients. Now There's Help
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Pat Wingert Doctors write millions of prescriptions annually for the class of medications called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). These drugs--Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Lexapro, Zoloft and Luvox--are among...
Sheik, Rattle and Roll; George Clooney Gets Heavy in Stephen Gaghan's Wild Oil-Industry Thriller 'Syriana.'
Byline: David Ansen There were more than a few moments in the complex, fascinating "Syriana"--writer-director Stephen Gaghan's globe-hopping sociopolitical thriller about the oil industry--when I was confused, not quite sure who was plotting to...
Sony Gets Caught with Slipped Discs
Byline: Steven Levy Benjamin Franklin once remarked that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. In that case, someone should immediately dispatch a cadre of psychiatrists to the headquarters...
Sources of Confusion; the Plame Drama Thickens, as Washington Once Again Tries to Guess Who Bob Woodward's Been Talking To
Byline: Evan Thomas and Michael Isikoff Who was Bob Novak's source? It's a parlor game any Washington insider or media junkie can play--and most do. Novak, a conservative columnist sometimes called "the Prince of Darkness," was the journalist who...
Tales from Travelers; Switch Laptops by Accident at Check-In? Trade Jobs with Your Colleague on Purpose? Yes, It Happens
We asked readers to tell us about some of their most unusual business trips, as well as to offer advice: SCOTT A. FRANCIS Latham, N.Y. I took a new employee on his first business trip: Albany, N.Y., to Cleveland. He hadn't traveled by air...
The Bonds That Bind Us; the 30-Year Treasury Bond Is Back on the Market after a Four-Year Hiatus. It's a Big Deal for Investors, and a Sign of the Government's Rapidly Shifting Fortunes
Byline: Allan Sloan (Sloan is NEWSWEEK's Wall Street editor. His e-mail is sloan@panix.com.) Bonds can be fun. And educational, too. No, I haven't lost my mind or joined a bond-trading desk. Rather, I'm looking at Uncle Sam's ever-changing relationship...
The Classroom: Other Schools of Thought; the Teaching of Evolution Continues to Polarize Communities
Byline: William Lee Adams Since the publication of "Origin" in 1859, Darwin's theory of evolution has brought trouble to American classrooms. In 1925, 15 states considered legislation to forbid public schools to teach the theory. In Tennessee that...
The Coming Drug Bust? the Newest Medicare Benefit Is Confusing and Costly. It May Not Be Much of a Political Boon to the People Who Created and Promoted It
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Good policy can make for good politics, and bad policy can make for bad politics. Republicans may be about to discover this truism with their Medicare drug benefit, passed by Congress in 2003 and scheduled to take effect...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Writing about evolution for this magazine didn't used to be a dangerous assignment. When Jerry Adler authored a 1982 cover story on the late paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould and his theory of "punctuated equilibrium," no one...
The Seats of Power; Goldman Sachs Rules the Street with Smarts and Tough Tactics. but Has It Gone Too Far with the Big Board Deal?
Byline: Charles Gasparino For investment bankers, this would be a dream scenario: to serve as an adviser on a major deal and own a piece of both companies that are merging. That way, the deal can pay off in fees and a jump in the value of either...
The Wages of Teaching; No School Administrator Should Ever Receive a Percentage Raise Greater Than the Raise Teachers Get. Neither Should State Legislators
Byline: Anna Quindlen A couple of years ago I spent the day at an elementary school in New Jersey. It was a nice average school, a square and solid building with that patented classroom aroma of disinfectant and chalk, chock-full of reasonably well-behaved...
We Don't Have AIDS, but We Suffer, Too; Often It's the Children of the Dying Who Must Care for Them and Keep It Hidden from the Rest of the World
Byline: Kerrel McKay (MCKAY, an HIV/AIDS outreach officer for the Jamaican Ministry of Health, lives in Jamaica.) I was 9 years old when I found out my father was ill. It was 1994, but I can remember my mother's words as if it were yesterday: "Kerrel,...
Who Gets the Organs? Experts Say Transplant Medicine Has a Race Problem
Byline: Ben Whitford During the three and a half years she waited for a kidney transplant, retired paralegal Mia Ray left her home in Orange, N.J., every other day and drove to a dialysis center in nearby Livingston. Sitting in a cubicle for hours...
Who'll Blink over GM? Our Wall Street Editor Explains the Turmoil in Its Stock
Byline: Allan Sloan Talk about whiplash. Last Wednesday, General Motors stock touched lows not seen since the 1980s, and chief executive Rick Wagoner felt compelled to issue a statement to employees that the company has "absolutely no plan, strategy...