Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 5

A New Spice in the Gumbo; Will Latino Day Laborers Locating in New Orleans Change Its Complexion?
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores (With T. Trent Gegax) Only one day after Hurricane Katrina tore through the Gulf Coast, Tranquilino Jimenez already had a job offer. An undocumented immigrant from Mexico, he set off from his home in Mobile, Ala., to join...
Bob Ney: Will Ethics Scandals Hurt GOP Bids in 2006?
***** CORRECTION: In "Will Ethics Scandals Hurt GOP Bids in 2006?" (Periscope, Dec. 5), we reported that Republican activist Grover Norquist had suggested that if Rep. Bob Ney faced a serious legal problem, he "should step aside for the good of...
Boeing's New Tailwind; the Jetmaker Is Cruising Again after Many Losses to Airbus
Byline: Andrew Romano On Dec. 7, 2003, Boeing executives arrived in Dubai for the city's biennial air show--and they were hoping for some good news. After all, the company's profits and stock price were slumping, and with 13 years since the last...
College Papers Grow Up; They Have the Ads, the Readers-And Budgets to Match
Byline: Nick Summers David Burrick edits a daily newspaper in Philadelphia. When big news breaks he deploys a staff of 200 reporters and photographers, flying them across the country if necessary, keeping an eye toward his $1 million budget. And...
Death in the Bush; Zimbabwe's Animals Are Dying, Which Means Its People Are Suffering, Too
Byline: Joshua Hammer The stench of decay rises from the bush just outside of Main Camp, the dilapidated, near-deserted head-quarters at Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park. Only a few months ago, the acacia groves, savanna grass and mopane scrub ran...
Eggs, Lies, Stem Cells; A Leading Scientist Quits, but Remains a Hero to Many
Byline: Mary Carmichael (With B. J. Lee in Seoul and Ben Whitford in New York) Hwang Woo-Suk may be a scientist, but in South Korea, he's virtually a rock-and-roll star. The first researcher to extract stem cells from a cloned human embryo, Hwang...
Even China Can't Hide a Toxic River
Byline: Sarah Schafer and Jonathan Ansfield Long before the disaster hit, Hu Fengbin was ready to sue. The Beijing lawyer had often suspected that a petrochemical plant, located upriver from his childhood home in Harbin, was one of the country's...
Exit Interview: A Showman's Parting Shot; Dieter Zetsche Quickly Mastered Motown When He Took over Chrysler in 2000. Now He Wants out of the Big Three
Byline: Keith Naughton When Dieter Zetsche arrived at Chrysler five years ago, Detroit viewed him with deep suspicion. With Chrysler sinking fast after its messy merger with Daimler-Benz, the mustached former Mercedes exec was cast as a storm trooper...
Fighting Anorexia: No One to Blame; the Age of Their Youngest Patients Has Slipped to 9 Years Old, and Doctors Have Begun to Research the Roots of This Disease. Anorexia Is Probably Hard-Wired, the New Thinking Goes, and the Best Treatment Is a Family Affair
Byline: Peg Tyre (With Karen Springen, Ellise Pierce, Joan Raymond and Dirk Johnson) Emily Krudys can pinpoint the moment her life fell apart. It was a fall afternoon in the Virginia suburbs, and she was watching her daughter Katherine perform in...
For Gamers, X Marks the Spot
Byline: Steven Levy I had barely reclaimed my breath from an exhilarating Thanksgiving Day 100mph-plus race through the streets of lower New York City when the notice came. "Westerby" wanted to chat--and race me head-to-head. I hadn't even realized...
Free Speech under Siege; in California, 'Progressive' Thinking Has Progressed to the Idea That Because Money in Politics Is Bad, Political Competition Is, Too
Byline: George F. Will Attacks on freedom of political speech are becoming more brazen. Because the attackers aim to enlarge government's control of the political campaigns that decide who controls government, the attacks advance liberalism's program...
Grads: Helping Get That First Job
Byline: Daniel McGinn As marketing executives, D. A. Hayden and Michael Wilder routinely interviewed new college graduates--and they often came away appalled. "I wanted to tell them, 'If you'd only done this [differently], I would have invited you...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin Q&A: BARBRA STREISAND Her old TV shows are now available in a five-DVD box, "Barbra Streisand: The Television Specials." She--and her publicist--spoke with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Can you hear me? I hear you very...
Panic Is Not the Solution; Many Democrats Are Understandably Enraged over Iraq. but in Responding in Equally Partisan Fashion, They Could Well Precipitate a Tragedy
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) The rising clamor in Washington to get out of Iraq may be right or may be wrong, but one thing is certain: its timing has little to do with events in that country. Iraq today...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: New York Times (2), Chicago Tribune, Reuters, Los Angeles Times, Albuquerque Journal, AP, New York Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution "From day one I've been saying, 'Indict my client'." Donna Newman, a lawyer for...
Rebel with A Cause; Sharon Was in Command of Likud. So Why Did He Bolt to Form a New Party?
Byline: Dan Ephron Ariel Sharon tends to make his big political decisions alone. It's a vestige from his days as a willful Army general, when he led troops from hill to hill and occasionally defied his superiors by charging enemy ground. When Sharon...
Technology: Time to Get Plugged In
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Hard-core gamers lined up around the block last week for the new $400 Xbox. But the toy industry is targeting the rest of us--children, tweens and adults--through a more primitive technology: plug and play. These games come...
The Blue-Collar CEO; Tom LaSorda Is the First Child of Labor Leaders to Run a Car Company. He'll Need More Than His Street Cred with Unions, Though, to Keep Chrysler Firing on All Cylinders
Byline: Keith Naughton For a carmaker, choreographing an elaborate new model show for its dealers can be as routine as an oil change. But at a rehearsal last month for a Chrysler extravaganza inside an enormous Las Vegas arena, the carmaker's past...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker At the Alexian Brothers Behavioral Health Hospital, one recovering anorexic told Karen Springen how she had restricted her daily diet to a couple of sticks of sugarless gum. "It brought back memories," Karen said. Although...
The New Way out; U.S. Leaders Finally Have a Coherent Approach-But Patience Is Wearing Thin
Byline: Michael Hirsh, Scott Johnson and Kevin Peraino (With John Barry in Washington) Only a few months ago, the road from Baghdad International Airport to the Green Zone was a symbol of American futility in Iraq. When talking heads in Washington...
The Vet Strategy; the Public Is Unhappy. the GOP Is on the Run. the Dems Have a Secret Weapon: Iraq War Vets, Deployed on a New Field of Battle
***** CORRECTION: In the 'The Vet Strategy,' Patrick Murphy was referred to as a lieutenant commander with the 82nd Airborne. In fact, he was a captain with the 82nd Airborne. Newsweek regrets the error. ***** Byline: Richard Wolffe and Jonathan...
To the Top of Half Dome and beyond; Tired of Sparring with My Teenager, I Decided to Show Him There's Something Bigger Than All of Us
Byline: Wendy Watson (Watson lives in Davis, Calif.) My son is 15 now. I'm a slipknot from 57; his father, Mort, still older. The past year was difficult for all of us. While Eric's demands for independence were over the top, his sense of responsibility...
'We Want to Make Our Babies Better'; A Father Describes His Daughter's Journey from Sickness to Health-And How His Family Had to Change
Byline: James S. Berrien (Berrien, president and publisher of Forbes Magazine Group, is now on the board of the National Eating Disorders Association.) Thirteen fathers stood in a circle holding hands. Each one of us had a different story about...