Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 9

9/11: A Special White House Slide Show
Byline: Mark Hosenball Why did some administration officials--including Vice President Dick Cheney--still lend credit to disputed reports of an April 2001 Prague meeting between 9/11 leader Muhammad Atta and an Iraqi spy even after the 9/11 Commission...
A Harvest of Treachery; Afghanistan's Drug Trade Is Threatening the Stability of a Nation America Went to War to Stabilize. What Can Be Done?
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai In the privacy of his sparsely furnished house in Kabul, a veteran Afghan Interior Ministry official says the situation may already be hopeless. Although he has no authorization to speak with the press, and...
A Terrible Connection
Byline: Dirk Johnson In a jealous rage, Marlon Brando Gill, 23, demanded to see his ex-girlfriend's cell phone. When she resisted, he went berserk. In a car in a Missouri parking lot, police say, Gill used his hands to force open the mouth of Melinda...
Candidates: Crisscrossing Paths
Byline: Jonathan Darman With no government salary or special stationery, former vice presidential candidates have only each other. As co-chairs of a Council on Foreign Relations task force on Russia, Jack Kemp, the Republican vice presidential candidate...
Doctors in the Cross Hairs; Iraq's Physicians Are Increasingly Targeted by Violence
Byline: Scott Johnson Abu Mohammed can't go near a hospital now. The Iraqi bone specialist, 37, has lived in fear since August, when his younger brother, also a doctor, was shot dead one night while walking home from his clinic in Baghdad. Abu Mohammed...
Finances: The Magic Number
Byline: Daniel McGinn In his younger years, Lee Eisenberg didn't think much about the size of his portfolio. As an editor at Esquire, he was busy coining terms like "power lunch" and pioneering rotisserie baseball. But when he hit his 50s, he began...
For Ryan out Loud; an Evolved Adams Wraps Up His Three-Album Series
Byline: Jac Chebatoris I hope you're hungry," singer-songwriter Ryan Adams calls out, by way of a welcome to his West Village apartment in New York City. A rose-covered teapot and cups soon appear, followed by steaming mugs of warm chicken-noodle...
Full Speed Ahead; after 9/11, Bush and Cheney Pressed for More Power-And Got It. Now, Predictably, the Questions Begin. Behind the NSA Spying Furor
Byline: Evan Thomas and Daniel Klaidman (With Mark Hosenball, Michael Isikoff and Richard Wolffe in Washington, D.C.) The talk at the White House in the days and weeks after 9/11 was all about suitcase nukes and germ warfare and surprise decapitation...
Happy Anniversary to the Dow's High
Byline: Allan Sloan There's nothing like a looming anniversary to make you contemplate some of life's bigger questions. And we're closing in on a big date for us stock-market types: six years since the record high of the Dow Jones industrial average....
It's the New Walking; Scooters Evolve from Medical Need to Lifestyle Choice
Byline: Jennifer Ordonez Retiree Robert Knievel, better known as '70s motorcycle daredevil Evel Knievel, got an odd request a few years ago from an overweight neighbor. "He was outside and said, 'Hey, Evel, I'm getting some exercise. You should...
Judi Dench
Byline: Nicki Gostin The divine Dame Judi turns in another Oscar-buzzing performance in "Mrs. Henderson Presents." She spoke with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. You play a widow and you lost your husband recently. Could you relate? Well, in that...
King's Final Years; as the Shadows Fell, King Looked North. It Was the Beginning of the End
Byline: Jonathan Alter Forty years ago this winter, I was an 8-year-old boy growing up on the North Side of Chicago. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had moved into a slum in the impoverished West Side neighborhood of North Lawndale to dramatize...
Music: The Rise of the 'Yupster'
Byline: Andrew Romano Music fans, rejoice: "list season"--that wintry instant when our nation's critics whittle a year of records into tidy top 10s--has come again. According to the album-review aggregators at Metacritic.com, Bob Dylan scored highest...
'My Boy' Had Become A Threat to Our Safety; Jack Was Smart, Obedient-And Growing More Aggressive. If Only We Hadn't Ignored the Signs
Byline: Jonathan Cooperman Sometimes there are no words--just a look. Upon my command, my Doberman, Jack, sat obediently in the vet's examining room. Four years old and in his prime, with 115 pounds of strapping muscle, he was at once impressive...
One Very Wild Pitch; Did Drugs Make a Star Hurler Rob a Jewelry Shop?
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores By Christmas day, Jeff Reardon was a physical and emotional wreck. The former star relief pitcher was struggling through a second holiday season without his son Shane, who died of a drug overdose in 2004 and would have...
Open to All: The Big Job
Byline: Anna Quindlen When the center for immigration Studies reported recently that 35 million American residents were foreign-born, the highest number in the nation's history, you could just imagine the reaction of the nativist types who wish...
Perspectives
"We have nothing to hide." Safwat Rashid, an Independent Electoral Commission of Iraq official, on Sunni Arabs' and secular groups' demanding a review of Iraq's elections "According to our judgment, Dr. Hwang's team doesn't have scientific data...
Right to the Top; Young, Creative Comics Are Using Digital Video and the Internet to Launch Careers-Sometimes Overnight
Byline: Brad Stone If you haven't yet seen the "Saturday Night Live" short "Lazy Sunday," you probably weren't checking your e-mail over the holidays. The two-and-a-half-minute video clip features "SNL" cast members Chris Parnell and Andy Samberg...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham The book Arthur Schlesinger Jr. was working on as Watergate began to unfold in 1972-73 was tentatively called "The Royal Presidency," but Schlesinger had a persistent feeling that the title was not quite right. Now 88, he recalls...
The 'Familymoon'; Now That Most Remarriages Involve Kids, Travel Companies and Experts Say It's Time to Face Facts. Bring Them along. You Can Have Wine and Roses Any Time
Byline: Susan H. Greenberg and Anna Kuchment (With Sana Butler) Cathy Wright's second honeymoon wasn't exactly the lush romantic getaway most newlyweds imagine. For one thing, she and her new husband, George, spent a night camped out in a cave....
The Wandering Soul; Anthony Hamilton's Rural Sound Confounded Music Execs. but a Rap Mogul Saw the Diamond in the Rough
Byline: Lorraine Ali It took the music industry 10 long years to figure out what to do with Anthony Hamilton. The soul singer didn't rap, he didn't croon slick R&B ballads and, worst of all, he dressed like a trucker circa 1974. After four failed...
Waiting for a Soft Landing
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson At the year-end, I usually scan a stack of economic reports to see what lies ahead. Well, folks, according to most forecasts we're headed for a swell year--though it will be boring. Typical is the forecast from the Organization...
We All Have a Lot to Learn
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Last week India was hit by a terror attack that unsettled the country. A gunman entered the main conference hall of the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, tossed four grenades into the audience and, when the explosives...
Winter's Tales; Who Needs 'American Idol'? This Year, Winter Is the New Fall, as the Networks Launch 10 New Shows in January. and We're Not Talking Cold Leftovers, Either
Byline: Marc Peyser Have you ever taken down the Christmas tree, cleaned up all the pine needles and wrapping paper and discovered, way back in the corner, an overlooked, unopened present? And it turns out to be a good one. This month is turning...