Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 2

A Species Yet Not Extinct; Some People Say More Troops-50,000 More-Should Be Sent to Iraq. Ike Skelton Says: 'Oh, We Have the Troops. but Are They Ready? No.'
Byline: George F. Will Republicans regret, or say they do, that there are no more "Truman Democrats" --Democrats as hardheaded about national security as was the president who formulated the cold-war policy of containment. That regret must amuse...
Battlefield Flashbacks; for Many Vietnam Veterans, the Iraq War Is a Trauma Trigger
Byline: Dan Ephron Scott Cameron and Dennis Kanke had a lot in common. Residents of Duluth, Minn., both fought in Vietnam and returned home with traumas that lingered for decades. Both clawed their way out of the pit with the help of therapy and...
BeliefWatch: God's Gift
Byline: Holly Lebowitz Rossi When sex is discussed in religious circles, the conversation is usually about morality: what you should and shouldn't do . But apparently for many Americans, sex is not just moral, physical or emotional--it's spiritual....
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) You may remember that employee stock options were supposed to make everybody rich. Well, they made some people rich who hit the market right and exercised their options in time. But...
Coming to America; the Brazilian-Made Obvio! Will Either Be the Little Green Car That Could or, as One Blogger Put It, Just 'Roadkill.'
Byline: Mac Margolis (With Karen Breslau) When automotive enthusiast Ricardo Machado made his play for the U.S. car market last year, no one paid him much mind. Machado, a lawyer and real-estate broker in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was by his own admission...
Dangerous Neighborhood; Hard Questions about Nukes, Civil War and Other Sore Topics for the Presidents of Two of the Hottest Spots in the Middle East
Byline: Lally Weymouth Iran and Iraq go side by side, not only on maps but among America's most urgent challenges. As the U.N. General Assembly convened last week in New York, the two presidents talked separately to NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth. While...
Exclusive: Harry Potter and the Wavering Costar
Byline: SEAN SMITH Harry Potter" might lose one of its stars. The fifth film in the series, "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," is currently filming at Leavesden Studios north of London. Negotiations to lock in Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter),...
Health: Getting Ready to Roll
Byline: Karen Springen From the day Avrick Altmann was born 15 months ago, his mom, Dr. Tanya Remer Altmann, has kept him moving. She gave him plenty of "tummy time" on the floor. She held up bright objects and rattles so he would lift his head....
Hewlett-Packard: One Chief Gone, Another Tries to Hang On
Byline: Brad Stone Hewlett-Packard CEO and newly named chairman Mark Hurd is hoping to keep his name off the growing list of corporate casualties in Silicon Valley's worsening spy scandal. At an unusual press conference last Friday in which the...
In Rove's Footsteps; They Learned from the Master, and Are Applying the Lessons in the Hottest Races Ahead. Meet the Architect's Proteges
Byline: Richard Wolffe In a darkened edit room in downtown Dallas, admaker Scott Howell is tinkering with his latest political firebomb. The ad starts with illegal immigrants running across the border. It then cuts to images of Osama bin Laden and...
Man of Leisure; Steve Case Made Exclusive Resorts No. 1 in the Destination-Club Industry-One $20 Million Property at a Time
Byline: Daniel McGinn If anyone needed a good vacation during the past few years, it was Steve Case. In early 2000, the celebrated founder of America Online engineered AOL's merger with Time Warner, which turned into the dot-com era's most disastrous...
Newsmakers
Byline: Marc Peyser, Devin Gordon Cameron Diaz Snaps Back The camera loves Cameron Diaz, but that doesn't mean that she cares much for cameramen. Last week Diaz filed a police report accusing a paparazzo of assault with a deadly weapon--the weapon...
One Hedge Fund's Wilting Fortunes
Byline: Allan Sloan We at NEWSWEEK don't print obituaries before our subject has been officially declared dead. But I'd like to make an exception for Amaranth, the hedge fund that became famous last week for losing $6 billion of its investors' money...
On the Lost Highway; Cormac McCarthy Sends a Father and Son on the Scariest Road Trip He Can Imagine. Seat Belts Fastened?
Byline: Malcolm Jones For a more than decent summary of the plot of Cormac McCarthy's latest novel, "The Road," consult the Library of Congress boilerplate that follows the book's title page: "1. Fathers and sons--Fiction. 2. Voyages and travels--United...
Passing the Pen Down to the Next Generation; I Wanted to Be Author of My Daughter's Destiny, but I Realized It's Time for Her to Write Her Own Endings
Byline: Lynne Smelser (Smelser lives in Brighton, Miss.) In this age of internet chat, videogames and reality television, there is no shortage of mindless diversions to keep a child occupied. And yet, despite the competition, my 8-year-old daughter...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: New York Times, Richmond Times-Dispatch, The Washington Post, Associated Press, New York Times (2), The Independent, Associated Press, Reuters, Associated Press "We haven't even begun rearming." Hizbullah leader Sheik...
Something Brewing; Green Mountain, a Specialty-Coffee Roaster, Is Betting a Whole Lotta Beans on a One-Cup-Machine Maker
Byline: Jennifer Barrett Robert Stiller has a knack for getting it right. In 1981, when he bought a specialty-coffee roaster in Vermont, instant coffee was more the norm and Starbucks hadn't spread beyond Seattle. But Stiller was convinced America's...
Tales from Travelers; Stranded in Kurdistan, Sick in Bratislava-But, Hey, Life's Good When You're Wearing a Snappy Tie
We asked readers to tell us about some of their most unusual business trips--and offer advice: Geoff Kronik Brookline, Mass. With my shoes off, laptop out and boarding pass held mug-shot style across my chest, I headed through the security check...
The Benefits of Busy; A New Study Finds That 'Overscheduling' Is a Myth
Byline: Daniel McGinn (With Karen Springen and Joan Raymond) For many families, figuring out how many after-school activities are too many is a struggle. For parents who fear they're "overscheduling" their children, a new study carries a soothing...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker I have always been a big fan of Annie Leibovitz--and so has almost every other magazine editor in the business. When the American Society of Magazine Editors last year asked its members to choose the best 40 covers of the past...
The Netflix Effect; Vacation Homes Are Hardly the Only Luxury Items That You Can Borrow. How about a Ferrari or a Gucci Handbag?
Byline: Jessica Ramirez When Nicole Cross opened the mail on a recent evening, she found a padded white envelope that gave her a reason to grin. She quickly tore it open to try on the contents: a pair of 14-karat-gold hoop earrings adorned with...
The Rise of Jihadistan; Five Years after the Afghan Invasion, the Taliban Are Fighting Back Hard, Carving out a Sanctuary Where They-And Al Qaeda's Leaders-Can Operate Freely
Byline: Ron Moreau, Sami Yousafzai and Michael Hirsh (With Zahid Hussain in Islamabad and John Barry in Washington) You don't have to drive very far from Kabul these days to find the Taliban. In Ghazni province's Andar district, just over a two-hour...
The Royal Treatment; in 'The Queen,' Helen Mirren Is Sublime as Princess Di's Distant Mother-in-Law
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz When Helen Mirren was growing up in postwar London, millions of Britons revered the royal family. Mirren's parents were not among them. "They didn't like the class system, and the royal family is the pinnacle of the class...
They Call Her 'Lucy's Daughter'; A 3 Million-Year-Old Ancestor Speaks to Us
Byline: Mary Carmichael It's been 3.2 million years since she died--and 32 since she was unearthed from the Ethiopian desert and christened after a Beatles song--but the prehuman fossil known as Lucy can still draw a crowd. Six hundred people showed...
They're Seeing Red over Greens
Byline: Matthew Philips Since 1990, Don Patterson has grown and sold nearly 50 million pounds of conventional fresh market spinach from his small farm in Cranbury, N.J. No one has ever reported getting sick from eating it, and he's never been cited...
This Week Online
Q&A: Barack Obama NEWSWEEK: As you've traveled around the country, many people seem to really respond to you. Why? Democratic Senator from Illinois: It's always hard to stand outside yourself and know what it is that people are reacting...
Through Her Lens; in Her New Book, Annie Leibovitz, Our Most Famous Photographer, Places Celebs Side by Side with Surprisingly Personal Images of Love and Loss. an Exclusive
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan (With Jac Chebatoris) Annie Leibovitz is tired and nursing a cold, and she' s just flown back to New York on the red-eye from Los Angeles, where she spent two days shooting Angelina Jolie for Vogue. Like so many of her...
Trickle-Up Economics? No One Should Be Happy with Today's Growing Inequality. It Threatens Our Social Compact, Which Relies on a Shared Sense of Well-Being
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson If you're in Asheville, N.C., stop by Biltmore, the vast estate that George Vanderbilt III--heir to a railroad fortune--constructed between 1889 and 1895. You can tour most of its 250 rooms, including 43 bathrooms and...
Wall Street Weaselwords; Pretexting, Backdating, Market Timing. So Many of the Phrases That Catch on in the Business World Obscure What's Really Happening. Can't We Use Just Plain English?
Byline: Allan Sloan There are times when having an English degree comes in handy for looking at the business world. This is one of those times, because the only way to grasp the essence of the Hewlett-Packard and "backdated" stock-options scandals...
What Iranians Least Expect; What If Bush Publicly Offered to Open an Embassy in Tehran?
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) If you think Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has said some crazy things, none comes close to this: "If the worst came to worst and half of mankind died, the other half would remain while...
What Little Town Blues? for 21st-Century Design, It's Smaller Cities That Rule
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan The fabled architectural sketch on a cocktail napkin has made a comeback. But in the case of the new Denver Art Museum, it was a boarding pass--Daniel Libeskind says he grabbed it as he flew over the city: "I copied the...
Who Is George Allen, Anyway? in a Campaign, Developments That Might Otherwise Be One-Day Stories End Up Crystallizing Deeper Doubts about a Candidate
Byline: Jonathan Alter In a subdued speech at the end of a rough week, Virginia Sen. George Allen didn't mention anything to the evangelical Family Research Council about his discovery of his Jewish heritage. He didn't reassure his audience that,...
Wisdom from the Big Digg; Kevin Rose's Web Site Lets the Masses Compose Their Own Front Page
Byline: STEVEN LEVY Some people say that the current Internet boom peaked when a national business magazine put a 29-year-old dude on the cover, declaring that the kid made $60 million in 18 months. Actually, Kevin Rose, founder of Digg.com, has...