Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 27

2006: A Space Oddity; It Took Seven Years to Get the Interstellar Romance 'The Fountain' into Theaters. That Was the Easy Part
Byline: Devin Gordon Darren Aronofsky's "The Fountain" stars Hugh Jackman and Rachel Weisz in a time-tripping, psychedelic love story set in three different centuries. The story of how it got made is either (a) the story of a gifted director who...
95+ Gifts-Untangling the Holidays
***** CORRECTION: Correction: In the "splurges" section of Tip Sheet's "Holiday Gift Guide Special," the price for the vermeil double-tassel crystal necklace by Erickson Beamon is $755 (212-643-4810 for more info). The mini leather key chain in...
A Man of Ideas in the Arena; Milton Friedman, 1912-2006
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The ideas of economists and political philosophers ... are more powerful than is commonly understood ... Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influence, are usually the slaves...
An Unseasonably Warm Thanksgiving; It Was Peculiar to Celebrate in July, but We Got to Enjoy Mom's Last Holidays. for That, We're Thankful
Byline: Jayne Steiner-Kanak (Steiner-Kanak lives in Belleville, Ill.) In the summer of 2003, I took leave from my job to care for my mother, Ada, who was in hospice care, terminally ill with emphysema. Every day I tried to come up with something...
A Terrible Mystery; New Clues and New Questions in the Hunt for a Cause
Byline: Mary Carmichael Thomas Insel spent years training as a psychiatrist in the 1970s, and in all that time he saw not one child with autism. In 1985, curiosity sent him searching; it took several phone calls to find a single patient. His only...
Beliefwatch: Bottom Line
Byline: Lisa Miller The biggest surprise to come out of the U.S. Catholic Bishops' conference in Baltimore was not the bishops' statements on birth control (against it) or homosexuality (sympathetic, but against it). The biggest surprise last week...
Evolution: Who Gave Us Our Smarts? 'I Don't Buy the Stereotype That Neanderthals Were Dumb.'
Byline: Jerry Adler, Henry Harpending Neanderthals, the extinct cousins of Homo sapiens who once populated much of Europe and western Asia, were in the news again last week, as the audacious project to sequence DNA from a 38,000-year-old fossil...
Friedman Excerpts; Many of Friedman's Ideas Still Seem Topical. Excerpts from His 18 Years of NEWSWEEK Columns
Byline: Milton Friedman Minimum-Wage Rates September 26, 1966 Congress has just acted to increase unemployment. It did so by raising the legal minimum-wage rate from $1.25 to $1.60 an hour. The result will be and must be to add to the ranks...
Health Gurus: Questionable Claims
Byline: Pat Wingert Actress and author Suzanne Somers has promoted cures from controversial health gurus, but her latest book may be the most problematic yet. In "Ageless," Somers relies on "independent researcher" T. S. Wiley, who encourages menopausal...
How Low Can You Go? Pretty Low, as It Turns out. Inside O. J. Simpson's New 'Confessional.'
Byline: Mark Miller, Andrew Murr and Weston Kosova (With Susannah Meadows) To those who worried our violent, sex-obsessed, celebrity-crazed culture had at last reached the very farthest depths of depravity, O. J. Simpson and Judith Regan come bearing...
How to Count Eyeballs; the Race to Develop the 'Nielsen Ratings' of the Internet
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts For 55 years the couch potato has belonged to Nielsen Media Research, the company that meticulously catalogs TV viewing habits for the benefit of advertisers that want to sell suds to the spuds. But now couch potatoes...
NBC Universal: Naming the Heir Apparent
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Industry followers have long been watching GE's NBC Universal, speculating about when CEO Bob Wright would be out. Last week two veteran execs left NBC for CEO jobs at AOL and at the parent of Discovery Channel. The departures...
Newsmakers: Emmitt Smith, Tom Cruise
Byline: N'gai Croal, Ramin Setoodeh Emmitt Smith NFL legend emmitt smith is now a reality-show champ, too. He spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Emmitt Smith, you just won "Dancing With the Stars." What are you going to do next? I'm not going to Disneyland....
Overhearing the Agenda; Call It Realignment, or Moderation. Just Don't Call It Liberal or Conservative, Democratic or Republican. Those Labels Really Don't Apply
Byline: Anna Quindlen Eavesdropping is an underrated form of information gathering. Listening to the conversation going on in the next booth at the diner--for a writer, that's invaluable. It's also a powerful child-rearing tool. Since for some reason...
Perspectives
"We'll succeed unless we quit." President George W. Bush, when asked during his visit to Vietnam which lessons from the Vietnam War could be applied to the war in Iraq "I guess he's going to have a better seat than all the rest of us." Former Michigan...
Snap Judgment: Movies
Byline: David Ansen DejA Vu Directed by Tony Scott This flashy Jerry Bruckheimer thriller, which starts with the terrorist bombing of a New Orleans ferry, asks that perennial sci-fi question: if you go back in time, can you change the future?...
South Korea: Too Much Activism? the Country's Idealistic '386 Generation' Helped Usher in Democracy, but Has Bungled Its Political Opportunity
Byline: B. J. Lee Song Young Gil and Won Hee Ryong epitomize South Korea's 386 generation--the dynamic group of activists who took it upon themselves to transform the country. They gained political power in their 30s, helped to usher in democracy...
Talking with the Enemy; How Far Will Iran and America Bend in Order to Stop the Sectarian Butchery in Iraq? Behind the Scenes as We Take Our First Tentative Steps toward Tehran
Byline: Michael Hirsh and John Barry (With Mark Hosenball) Over a dinner of savory kebab, they talked of the trips they've taken, and their favorite places. James Baker, the longtime confidant of the Bush family, spoke nostalgically of his visits...
The Clinton Battle Plan; 'People Didn't Give Democrats a Mandate,' Bill Clinton Warns. 'They Gave Us a Chance.' A Chance to Do What?
Byline: Jonathan Alter (With Eleanor Clift) For right-wing conspiracy theorists, this is the belly of the beast--a dinner at the Four Seasons in New York for the 20th anniversary of Harvard's Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public...
The Democrats' New Fault Lines
Byline: Howard Fineman George Miller was reared in the liberal Democratic Party of Northern California--not the fancy Nob Hill kind, but the fiery kind bred in the docks, shipyards and canneries of the East Bay. His father was state party chairman...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham For a time, Susan and Jeff Hudkins thought they knew what they were up against. First in 1997 and again in 2000, their two little boys were diagnosed with very different forms of autism. The parents understood then that their...
The Forgotten Battleground; Markets Are Supposed to Be Smart. So What Are They Trying to Tell Us?
***** CORRECTION: CLARIFICATION: In "The Forgotten Battleground" (Nov. 27), we said that Britain lost the Boer War. In fact, it lost the first Boer War in 1881 but prevailed in 1902. ***** Byline: Fareed Zakaria President Bush flew halfway...
The Iraq Primary; It's Been Bush's Problem. but as the 2008 Presidential Election Looms, Contenders in Both Parties Are Sorting out Their Iraq Positions. What They'd Do, and Who They Listen To
Byline: Jonathan Darman (With Eleanor Clift, Susannah Meadows, Daren Briscoe and Lee Hudson Teslik) For a moment, at least, John McCain and Hillary Clinton shared a common cause. It was one week after the midterm elections. They were back in the...
The Military: A Renewed War over 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'
Byline: Debra Rosenberg With the democrats in control of Congress, some activists are hoping they'll add a controversial issue to their to-do list: revisiting the "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military. Gay servicemembers have sought...
There's No 'I' in Islam; Muslim Societies Have a Long and Rich History of Civil Organizations, from Learning Circles to Trade Guilds, Dating Back to the Early-20th Century
Byline: Azyumardi Azra (Azra is president of Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University in Jakarta and an Advisory Board member of the U.N. Democracy Fund.) A strong civic culture is crucial for a healthy democracy. It's been said that Muslim...
There's Something about Mary; A New Broadway Musical Shows the Dark Side of Our Favorite Nanny, and Sheds Light on Us
Byline: Cathleen Mcguigan Mary Poppins was always a cultural oddity. Created by P. L. Travers in a series of books begun during the Depression, she was enchanting to generations of children for her magic powers--she could fly and talk to animals--and...
To Capture A Movement; Civil Rights, Violence and the Power of the Press
Byline: David Gates If you watched the rebroad-cast of PBS's "Eyes on the Prize" last month, you might want a look behind the footage. In their new book, "The Race Beat," journalists Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff tell the story of the press (now...
What Happens When They Grow Up; Teenagers and Young Adults Are the Emerging Face of Autism as the Disorder Continues to Challenge Science and Unite Determined Families
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Julie Scelfo (With Karen Springen and Mary Carmichael Graphic by Jessica Ramirez and Marc Bain) Chicken and potatoes. Chicken and potatoes. Danny Boronat wants chicken and potatoes. He asks for it once, twice ... 10...
Zune Should Go beyond 'Squirting'; How Cool Would It Be to Take a Break at the Gym and Check out the Contents of Nearby Music Players?
Byline: Steven Levy Have you squirted a song yet? That's the question Microsoft hopes your friends will ask you as you ponder which digital music player to acquire. Although you are more likely to buy an iPod this season--something even Microsoft...