Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 01, January 5

2008: Rod, Eliot, Yuck
Byline: George F. Will During the presidential contest between an African-American from Chicago and a plumber from Toledo, eros reared its beguiling head. Never a stickler for rhetorical ruffles and flourishes, the president simply said: "This...
As Bad as It Gets, until It Gets Worse
Byline: Rod Nordland When you hear the brutal details about Zimbabwe, it's hard to imagine how it can get any worse without the government collapsing, or Robert Mugabe resigning. The hyperinflation, the millions going hungry, the canceled anti-AIDS...
Ben Bernanke, Jean-Claude Trichet and Masaaki Shirakawa
Three gray eminences may decide the fate of the global economy next year. By Robert J. Samuelson They're technocrats, schooled in subjects that bore most people. They are appointed--not elected--to top government jobs, and what they do is not...
Cast out of Washington, Republicans Rethink
Byline: Andrew Romano For most Republicans, losing 21 seats in the House, seven seats in the Senate and the leadership of the free world isn't cause for celebration. But most Republicans aren't governors. When the GOP state executives met in Miami...
David Axelrod and Valerie Jarrett
The most loyal Friends of Barack will carry new weight in the White House. Harry Truman quipped that true friendship in Washington comes in canine form. But for President-elect Obama, a couple of trusted friends have something almost as precious...
E. A. Adeboye
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Rod Nordland in London, Anne Underwood in New York and Abbas Poptani in London A Pentecostal preacher from Nigeria has made big plans to save your soul. You may never have heard of E. A. Adeboye, but the pastor of The...
For Dr. Doom, a Crash Worthy of His Warnings
Byline: Daniel McGinn With the economy in a tailspin and the layoff tally climbing, this is a tough time to be a second-year M.B.A. student who's about to hit the job market. It may be especially tough for the students who gathered in a second-floor...
From Bored to Bedazzled, in Eight Races
Byline: Mark Starr My favorite venue at the Summer Olympics in Beijing was the Water Cube, especially at night, when its lights bathed the pathways in soft but colorful purple hues. But stuck inside for nine days, with hundreds of reporters crammed...
Gen. David Petraeus
America's most able general is forging a new approach to the Muslim world. With no small amount of hyperbole, Gen. David Petraeus was sworn in as the new head of Central Command on a bright October morning in Tampa. "He is the pre-eminent soldier,...
Hillary Clinton and Bill Clinton
Byline: Jonathan Alter The most powerful couple in politics may find the times suited to their skills. They're baaaack!!! Just when you thought the Clintons had gone the way of the Macarena and John Wayne Bobbitt--consigned to the dustbin of...
Hu Jintao
The man behind the wheel of the world's most supercharged economy. He may be the kind of guy you wouldn't ordinarily think twice about--cautious, colorless and corporate. In the past he has often lost the spotlight to other world leaders with bigger...
If I Had Subpoena Power: Five Questions for Obama
Byline: Michael Isikoff Invoking his wartime commander-in-chief authority, NEWSWEEK Editor Jon Meacham has granted yours truly, a lowly investigative correspondent, sweeping subpoena power to demand that President-elect Barack Obama and his transition...
Jeff Bezos
CEO, Amazon.com You know him as the man who allows you to buy almost anything and everything online (order now for free shipping!). What you might not know is that he is poised to become a major cultural arbiter, especially in the book world. The...
Jim Rogers
Byline: Sharon Begley The CEO of Duke Energy could make dreams of renewable power a reality. Duke Energy Corp. is not the world's greenest utility, and CEO Jim Rogers is no green saint. The company was sued by Environmental Defense, the research...
John Lasseter
Byline: Jennie Yabroff ***** Correction: In the Dec. 29/Jan. 5 profile of John Lasseter ("The Global Elite"), we stated incorrectly that "Wall-E" and "Bolt" were produced by Pixar studios. In fact, "Wall-E" was produced by Pixar and "Bolt" by...
Katsuaki Watanabe
With rivals struggling, Toyota's chief is set to dominate the auto industry. Katsuaki Watanabe is not looking for a bailout from anybody. Sure, the straight-talking president of Toyota is weathering the same storm buffeting all the world's automakers....
Not-So-Ordinary People
During a historic election, their stories captivated us for a moment--then they vanished. We revisit them to bring you the next chapter. Samuel Wurzelbacher Starting point: After grilling Barack Obama about his tax plan during an Ohio rally,...
Player or Pretender?
In an age of instant Internet celebrity, viral marketing and reality TV, it's harder and harder to distinguish between actual influence and good PR. Skip the press releases--here's the definitive call. From politicians to pirates, who's all hype and...
Rahm Emanuel
Byline: Howard Fineman Obama means to control Washington. His chief of staff will be at the wheel. When it comes to Rahm Emanuel, there is more than one fish story. All of Washington knows the tale of the dead fish: how he delivered one, Corleone...
Remember Them Well
They were golden boys and 'Golden Girls.' Stars and star athletes. Gurus and grumps and geniuses. In 2008, we said goodbye to them all, with regrets. Bernie Mac, 50 How do you pay tribute to a man who once said that after he died, he didn't want...
Saving the World, One Molecule at a Time
Byline: Jeneen Interlandi Ever since Alexander Fleming noticed a clump of blue-green mold destroying a neighboring culture of bacteria in a nearly discarded petri dish, scientists have searched the most unlikely of places for cures to human disease....
Steve Jobs
Byline: Daniel Lyons The ailing creator of the iPod and iPhone is next to irreplaceable. For two years I wrote a satirical blog under the persona of Apple founder and CEO Steve Jobs, and one of the recurring themes was that Jobs is not actually...
The American Dream-Only This Time in Reverse
Byline: Daniel McGinn When you walk through a FOR SALE house with a real-estate agent, you expect to hear gushing about the "solid bones" or the "great potential." But as I toured listings this year while covering the deepening housing crisis, I...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: JON MEACHAM PRESIDENTIAL-CAMPAIGN YEARS can be tough for the word "elite." Deploying the tactics of a half-century-old culture war, Republicans tend to try to paint the Democrats (and much of the mainstream press) as somehow out of touch...
The Global Elite
Politicians, soldiers, titans, priests--these are the 50 most powerful people in the world. Barack Obama The new U.S. president will be judged by whether he can save capitalism. By Fareed Zakaria The great sociologist Max Weber described...
The History of Power
Byline: Jon Meacham The study of power is not only diverting (which Homer and Shakespeare knew), but illuminating. A biography of an ancient human impulse. Barack Obama has a good Al Gore story. Sometime after the 2000 election, Obama called...
Timothy Geithner
Byline: Daniel Gross Obama's Treasury secretary will help define the new global financial system. Confidential sources have passed on to me a January to-do list apparently penned by Timothy Geithner, the New York Fed chief tapped to serve as...
Vladimir Putin
With political opposition crushed and the media throttled, he's still in charge. Vladimir Putin officially stepped down from the job last May, but he remains firmly in power. He can and probably will run for president again in 2012. If he chooses...