Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 20, May 17

53 Hours in the Life of a near Disaster
Byline: Evan Thomas and Mark Hosenball Frustrated sons of privilege, caught between East and West, sometimes make for dangerous militants. Mohamed Atta, the lead 9/11 hijacker, was the son of a Cairo lawyer and the grandson of a doctor. The so-called...
Buffett Gets Animated
Byline: Joshua Alston When capitalists of every stripe descended on Omaha for the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting, shareholders were treated to the premiere of Warren Buffett's long-gestating animated series for kids, Secret Millionaires Club....
Bust Up the Banks
Byline: Nouriel Roubini and Stephen Mihm The president's half-measures won't fix our failed financial system. Here's what will. In early January, Ben Bernanke defended the Fed's handling of the recent financial crisis. The lesson he drew was...
Can't Touch Him
Byline: Howard Fineman Obama's uncanny ability to shake off blame. Let's try a political thought experiment. Imagine that a few months after a new president takes office, his administration approves an offshore oil well a mile beneath the Gulf...
Containing Terror
Byline: Philip Mudd Like communism during the Cold War, terrorism is a social movement that must be held in check. The spike of alleged terrorist plots in this country over the past year seems confusing. Law-enforcement officers have nabbed independent...
Gimme Danger
Byline: Seth Colter Walls It's a fact as undeniable as it is oft-repeated: in the late '60s and early '70s, the Rolling Stones were incapable of doing wrong. Or, at the very least, the wrongs they were committing were exactly the sort that the public...
Goldman's Golden Ticket
Byline: Jonathan Alter How the firm can find its way out of Toyotaland. As you may have heard, NEWSWEEK is for sale, and we're looking for a few good billionaires (actually, one will do). For all the anti-Wall Street rhetoric, there are good...
Health Care Hell
Byline: Bart Stupak During the past few months, I often drew strength from a poem taped to my desk in Washington and framed on the wall of my home office in Menominee, Mich. "Bullfight critics ranked in rows," it begins, "Crowd the enormous plaza...
Hillbilly Haute Cuisine
Byline: Steve Tuttle For centuries, my Appalachian ancestors have gone to the woods to hunt for deer, pick wild asparagus and blackberries, and fish for trout in streams. But of all the hillbilly delicacies to be found gratis in the great Virginia...
How Quickly We Forget
Byline: Sharon Begley Our addiction to cheap energy has a way of clouding memories of even the most vivid disasters. In trying to predict the long-term effects of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, the obvious places to seek clues are other mammoth...
Lowering the Bar
Byline: Julia Baird When bad mothers give us hope. When reporters told Doris Lessing she had won a Nobel Prize in Literature as she was hauling groceries out of a cab in 2007, she said: "I've won all the prizes in Europe, every bloody one, so...
'Muhammad Only Leads to the Grave'
Byline: Jon Meacham and Lisa Miller Franklin Graham, infuriated by his disinvitation to the Pentagon's National Day of Prayer ceremony last week, argues that he is being discriminated against for his beliefs. The son of evangelist Billy Graham talked...
Newsweek at a Crossroads
Byline: Jon Meacham We have a mission to fulfill, no matter how difficult the week. Last Wednesday morning, in a meeting with the magazine's staff, our owner, Donald E. Graham, the chairman and CEO of The Washington Post Company, announced that...
Not Your Father's Taliban
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau How a radical new generation is defying the old guard and upending America's plans for a lasting peace. Abdul Malik describes the confrontation with unconcealed relish. The 25-year-old Taliban tells how Mullah...
'On Whitman': The Real American
Byline: Jeremy McCarter If I were to count up the things I love best about America, this tableau would be high on the list: Walt Whitman, on a street in Washington, exchanging a respectful bow with Abraham Lincoln as the president's carriage rolled...
Russia, Home of the Next Silicon Valley?
Byline: Owen Matthews For all its inefficiencies, the Soviet Union had something to teach modern Russia about economics. The communists lavishly supported science and technology, and as a result Russia put the first man in space in 1961. But since...
Slick Operator
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Michael Hirsh How British oil giant BP used all the political muscle money can buy to fend off regulators and influence investigations into corporate neglect. Tony Hayward, the CEO of BP, has a couple of major problems...
Terrorism's Supermarket
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Why Pakistan keeps exporting jihad. Faisal Shahzad, the would-be terrorist of Times Square, seems to have followed a familiar path. Like many earlier recruits to jihad, he was middle-class, educated, seemingly assimilated--and...
The Limits of Influence
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick No way to pick a justice. The hunt for Justice John Paul Stevens's replacement has become singularly focused on personality type. Instead of searching for the most brilliant jurist in the country, we have become obsessively...
The Weakest Link
Byline: Daniel Gross Why industries should band together. Remember that imported English television game show from a few years ago? The host would dismiss the unfortunate slob who failed to guess the answer to some obscure bit of trivia with...
Trickle-Down Misery in L.A
Byline: George F. Will Mayor Villaraigosa's nightmare numbers. Los Angeles--to get from downtown to the residence of the man who, in 2005, became the first Hispanic elected mayor since 1870, you drive through a sliver of Korea. With 125,000 people...