Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 159, No. 11, March 12

150 Fearless Women
They've started revolutions, opened schools, and fostered a brave new generation. From Detroit to Kabul, these women are making their voices heard. IN MEMORIAM Marie Colvin, 1956-2012 Marie Colvin of the London Sunday Times was legendary among...
A Long Way to Go, Baby
Byline: Leslie Bennetts The stubborn gender gap When a congressional committee hearing presented an all-male panel of witnesses to discuss female contraception last month, Rep. Carolyn Maloney made news by demanding, "Where are the women?" ...
Asma Al-Assad
Byline: Christopher Dickey Glamorous, charming, and smart, she was a darling of the Western press--until her dictator husband crossed the line. By Christopher Dickey Before her husband answered Syria's peaceful revolution with ruthless slaughter,...
Dershowitz Convicts Dsk
Byline: John Solomon The maid was discredited. The former IMF chief got off. But was he guilty?ww The theater-style, fluorescent-lit classroom at Harvard University's law school was virtually silent on a crisp fall afternoon. And why not? It's...
He's Back!
Byline: Rebecca Dana You may not like it, but Maria Shriver is giving Ahhnold a second chance. Don't do it, Maria! That is what anyone with a sense of a woman's dignity was thinking last week when reports emerged that Maria Shriver was considering...
How I Escaped
Byline: Sabatina James When I refused an arranged marriage, I sparked a violent war with my mother--and a threat on my life. When I was 18, my parents threatened to kill me. And they meant it. If they had their way, I would probably be dead today....
How Obama Could Lose
Byline: Paul Begala Yes, things are looking up for the Democrats. But foreign policy could upend everything this fall. If there was one iron law I learned in my years working in the White House it is this: stuff happens. (Of course, we had a...
Let's Talk about Sex
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz That's the only way to get U.S. HIV rates down. This week the world's experts on HIV/AIDS will gather in Seattle for their annual meeting and to gloat, a little, over their remarkable accomplishments. Globally, the rate...
My Favorite Mistake: Aretha Franklin
Aretha Franklin on the hat that created a worldwide sensation. Three years ago I looked everywhere for a hat to wear to President Obama's inauguration. I was so excited to sing, because it was such an important moment for our country. It had to...
Photo Shop
Byline: Dan Lyons Will Pinterest be Silicon Valley's next big hit? One reason people like social media so much better than TV is that with the tube you just sit there on your couch, but with social media you can be part of the show. Sites like...
Sarah's Revenge
Byline: David Frum She rose fast, flamed out--then got mad. David Frum on HBO's 'Game Change'--and how Sarah Palin stirred a revolt against Obama's America. Few things seemed quite so dead in 2008 as the campaign book. The genre--invented by...
Symbols and Strength: Women in the World
Byline: Tina Brown When Hillary Clinton travels around the world as secretary of state, she is a global celebrity of the first rank. But that's not how she felt when she went to Burma for the first time in 2011 to meet with the heroic Aung San Suu...
The Lady's Destiny
Byline: Rebecca Frayn Aung San Suu Kyi gave up her husband, her children, and 22 years of her life to fight for democracy in Burma. With elections just weeks away, filmmaker Rebecca Frayn reports on this woman's long story of sacrifice as it reaches...
The Power of Evita
Byline: Lizzie Crocker Patriot and feminist, beloved and despised. Elena Roger takes on the polarizing First Lady of Argentina in a new Broadway revival. It always sounded like a Hollywood movie: a working-class woman dreams of stardom, falls...
The War on Texas Women
Byline: Michelle Goldberg Reproductive rights are under attack. On the front lines of the latest battleground--and how Planned Parenthood is fighting back. When the electronics company that 50-year-old Tena Price operated with her husband lost...
The World on A Page
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan A horse-riding prime minister, squabbling Aussies--and 'bailout' Sudoku. WOMEN IN THE WORLD (BANK) Has Christine Lagarde's elevation to head of the International Monetary Fund spurred a copycat response at the Other...
What Are They Hiding?
Byline: Allison Samuels This trio is keeping politicians' secrets--and breaking ground at the same time. Female writers and producers are no longer a rarity in television--think Chelsea Handler, Whitney Cummings, and The Good Wife co-creator...
Where Women Are on Top
Byline: Jesse Ellison How stuffy old NPR became a hotbed for female journalists. You're familiar with the stereotype: humor-less, ever so slightly imperious, Birkenstock-wearing brown-rice enthusiasts. These are the women of NPR, forever etched...