Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 23

Addicted to Exercise
Byline: Sarina Rosenberg During her years at Smith College, Caitlin Scafati battled what's known as exercise bulimia--a type of eating disorder that drives patients to cut their weight by working out at least two hours a day. In addition to extreme...
A Death in the MTV Family; 'Run's House' Was a Comedy. Then Reality Hit Home
Byline: Allison Samuels Back when reality TV stormed the beaches of prime time, when we first saw people eating worms or marrying strangers or jumping out of helicopters, the conventional wisdom was that the insanity wouldn't stop until the ultimate...
A Horse of a Very Different Color
Byline: David Ansen If you were to watch Robinson Devor's "Zoo" with no sound, it might take you a long time to realize that the subject of this eerily beautiful movie is bestiality. Frame by frame, "Zoo" casts a dark, disturbingly lyrical spell,...
Ask the Pro; Barb Schwaro President and Founder, International Association of Home Staging Professionals
Byline: Linda Stern It's a buyer's market, and you want to sell. How can you make your home stand out? TIP SHEET's Linda Stern asked Schwarz. What do home stagers do? We prepare homes for sale. We detail the house like you detail a car. Staging...
A Team Stands Tall
Byline: Raina Kelley, Mark Starr and Eve Conant It was a team meeting unlike any other. Seated on straight-backed chairs and couches in a living room of the New Jersey governor's mansion just outside Princeton, 10 members of Rutgers University's...
A 'War' for Inclusion; Hispanics Seek a Role in the New Ken Burns Film
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores When Raquel Garza watched a short preview in November of the upcoming World War II documentary "The War," by acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns, she was impressed. "It was very cool, definitely very interesting," says Garza,...
Baby, You Can Drive in My Car-Via Web
Byline: Steven Levy Kate Sydney had never met me, but on the basis of sharing a mutual acquaintance, and knowing what I like for breakfast, she unhesitatingly opened the door of her 1998 Nissan so I could ride to Target with her. The trip--from...
Beating the Loan Sharks
Byline: Linda Stern Here's more bad news from the college-costs-a-fortune department: student loans have lost their bargain interest rates, and, according to a new investigation of lending practices in New York state, your school's financial-aid...
Beliefwatch: Mrs. Pastor
Byline: Matthew Philips In Selmer, Tenn. (population: 4,600), last week, the murder trial of Mary Winkler began with defense lawyers painting the soft-spoken pastor's wife as the victim of an abusive marriage who accidentally pulled the trigger...
Beware the Blinkers; Snap Judgments Are Cool, except When They're Wrong
Byline: Jerry Adler Angelos Delivorrias, director of the Benaki Museum in Athens, knew at a glance that the marble statue of a young man was a fake. True, before purchasing the piece, the Getty Museum in Los Angeles had hired legions of experts,...
Escaping from the O.C. Adam Brody Stars as a Boy/man Learning How to Love
Byline: David Ansen Jonathan Kasdan's "In the Land of Women" introduces us to its 26-year-old hero, Carter Webb (Adam Brody), as he is getting his heart broken by his glamorous French girlfriend, Sophia (Elena Anaya), who dumps him in an L.A. coffee...
How to Make A Buck Green
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) So where's the money in climate change? Investors sense a tumultuous market in the making, if they can only hit it right. "Sometimes I feel like a fly on the wall, watching a new era...
John McCain, Undeterred
Byline: George F. Will Admiration is not much practiced in today's dyspeptic politics. Surely, however, Americans of all persuasions should pause in their partisan furies and honor what John McCain did last week with his speech at the Virginia Military...
Know Thyself-Man, Rat or Bot
Byline: Sharon Begley Whether it is an eerily human bot in a virtual-reality game, an animal looking at you with soulful eyes or a patient in a vegetative state, the question nags and nags and won't go away: is there a thinking, self-aware, conscious...
Kurt Vonnegut, 1922-2007
Byline: David Gates It's hard to imagine why Kurt Vonnegut was called a "pessimist" or a "cynic." He lived through three quarters of the worst century ever, and saw enough of this one to get the picture. He didn't just read about the madness and...
Lives of Crime; Novelists John Banville and Donald Westlake Compare Notes on the Seedy Worlds That Inspire Their Fiction
Byline: Malcolm Jones Centuries from now, when archeologists sift the rubble to understand our culture, they will be fortunate indeed to uncover the works of Donald E. Westlake. His 45 witty crime novels are as reliable a guide to the foibles and...
Looking for Answers to My Nephew's Death; When a Loved One Takes His Own Life, We Have to Learn to Accept That We May Never Know Why
Byline: Paul C. Dalmas (Dalmas lives in Berkeley, Calif.) When the phone rang at 7 o'clock on a Sunday morning, I knew the call was too early to be anything but terrible news. "Adam is dead." My brother-in-law's voice was shaking. "He bought...
Newsmakers: Tori Spelling
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh, Nicki Gostin Q&A: Tori Spelling The "90210" star has a new reality show, "Tori & Dean: Inn Love," with her husband on the Oxygen network. She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Do the Tori groupies book rooms at the inn?...
Now, We're Talking to the Brotherhood
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball A brief encounter at a Cairo cocktail party could signal a shift in Bush administration policy toward the Muslim Brotherhood, a worldwide Islamic movement that the United States has shunned because of its...
PBS at a Crossroads; A Controversial Series on the Post-9/11 World Isn't Exactly Fair and Balanced-And That's Why It Works
Byline: Devin Gordon In "The Case for War," the third installment of PBS's sprawling, 11-part, $20 million documentary series "America at a Crossroads," former Bush administration adviser Richard Perle spends the better part of an hour explaining...
Perspectives
"Our forces are stretched." Defense Secretary Robert Gates, on the decision to extend the tour of duty from 12 to 15 months for troops currently in Iraq and Afghanistan "His understanding started very, very early in the administration that those...
Rethinking the Unthinkable; Saul Friedlander's Massive History of the Holocaust Is a Judicious, Authoritative and Restrained Study. but It's Also a Stark Reminder That Lunacy May Have Been as Much a Part of Nazism as Cruelty
Byline: David Gates The head takes the longest to burn; two little blue flames flicker from the eyeholes ... the entire process lasts twenty minutes--and a human being, a world, has been turned into ashes." A Polish Jew named Zalman Gradowski wrote...
Something in (and on) the Air
Byline: Howard Fineman There's another hot story in morning radio: African-American comedian Steve Harvey. In 17 months, his show has rocketed to prominence in top-50 markets. He's based on urban stations, but exhibits strong crossover appeal. He...
That Night at Duke; They Spent a Year Accused of Kidnapping, Assault and Rape. Now, Though, the Three Duke Lacrosse Players Were Told They Were 'Innocent.' the Inside Story of the Infamous Evening
Byline: Susannah Meadows and Evan Thomas (With Jonathan Bloom) The room went dead silent as the North Carolina attorney general, Roy Cooper, began to speak. The three Duke lacrosse players and their families were gathered in front of a TV at the...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham In the summer and autumn of 2004, I was part of a series of panel discussions on MSNBC, anchored by Chris Matthews, on the presidential campaign. One morning my colleague Jonathan Alter stopped in the doorway of my office to...
The Move from Hell; in the Past Four Years, the Pentagon Has Sent 9 Million Tons of Gear to Iraq. Getting It All Back Will Take Time
Byline: Dan Ephron Most everyone agrees that a precipitous American withdrawal from Iraq would be disastrous. Fewer people realize it may be impossible. In the past four years, the U.S. military has shipped to the region more than 9 million tons...
The Perils of Pulling out; Everyone Is Talking about Whether the United States Should Withdraw from Iraq. but Is Anyone Actually Planning for That Day?
Byline: Christopher Dickey and John Barry (With Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad, Kevin Peraino and Joanna Chen in Jerusalem, Lina Sinjab in Damascus, Owen Matthews in Istanbul and Alexandra Bunzl in Paris) The battle lines may be clearer in Washington...
The Power That Was
Byline: This story was written by Weston Kosova with reporting from Johnnie L. Roberts, Richard Wolffe, Sarah Childress, Raina Kelley, Daren Briscoe, Allison Samuels, Eve Conant, Mark Hosenball and Eleanor Clift. As he spoke, Don Imus had no inkling--none,...
Trouble in Toyland; Babies Need Time, Books and Love, Not Genius Gear
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz You see them everywhere: harried parents hauling their little ones off to classes in Mandarin, gymnastics or classical violin. At home, they're filling nurseries with "educational" rattles and mobiles. It's all for a worthy...
What Will We Learn?
Byline: Ellis Cose There is a predictable pattern to these things. Someone prominent--almost always a male--says something indisputably vile. And when his world explodes as a result, he belatedly begs forgiveness. Don Imus, of course, is the...