Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 07, February 18

Accounting 101: The Clintons
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff Hillary and Bill Clinton are not nearly as wealthy as, say, Mitt Romney, but her recent $5 million emergency loan to her own presidential campaign has made one thing clear: the Clintons are doing just fine,...
Back on the Tape Trail
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball Newly released documents suggest that the U.S. government videotaped more Qaeda suspects than it has publicly disclosed. Court filings unsealed last week show that federal prosecutors recently informed...
Beijing's Visa Crackdown
Byline: Mary Hennock and Melinda Liu Every Olympic host takes counterterror precautions before the Games. But Beijing's housecleaning also includes foreign activists seeking the Olympic spotlight, some of whom condemn what they call the "Genocide...
Chelsea Come Lately
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores; With Ramin Setoodeh, Martha Brant and Matthew Hansen The former--and possibly future--First Daughter is becoming a potent weapon for her mom on the trail. After a round of applause and a smattering of cheers at Creighton...
Does A Light Saber Chop Hay, Hayden?
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Hayden Christensen teleports around the world in the new sci-fi movie "Jumper." He spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Is it true that you own a farm? I bought it for my family. It's just north of Toronto, and I spend some time...
Google Yourself --and Enjoy It
Byline: Lorraine Ali; With Jessica Ramirez A host of new companies are offering to polish and shine reputations online. A Wall Street hopeful we'll call John didn't expect to see much when he Googled his name, but right there, at the top of the...
He's One of Us Now
Byline: Andrew Romano Obama embodies my generation's attitudes and aspirations, for better and for worse. Ah, the folly of youth. On Sept. 24, 2007, I pitched a story to my boss at NEWSWEEK about "Barack Obama and young voters--specifically,...
His Magical Mystery Tour
Byline: Sharon Begley Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 91, Hindu Teacher Born in central India, the one-time spiritual guru to the Beatles is credited with introducing the West to Transcendental Meditation. He died last Tuesday at his home in the Netherlands....
How to Train A Husband
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Want an obedient spouse? A new book says you should coach them like animals. Attention, frustrated wives: if you want your husband to start listening to you and stop leaving his socks on the floor, all you need is a little...
I'm Not Who You Think I Am
Byline: Carol Paik; Paik Lives In New York City. Being confused for every other Asian woman used to be maddening--until I fell into the same trap. Once I was mistaken for Vera Wang. I could have viewed this as a compliment, overlooking the fact...
'I'm Still in the Race'
Byline: Howard Fineman He's got a delegate deficiency. But don't start asking Mike Huckabee about the veep slot just yet. Running on little cash, Mike Huckabee manages to get much free publicity because of his preacher's gifts and garage-band...
'It Sits on Your Conscience'
Byline: Scott Johnson Haunted by Rwanda, Kofi Annan tries to halt Kenya's slow tragedy. More than a decade ago, when he was head of peacekeeping for the United Nations, Kofi Annan oversaw the blue helmets who failed to prevent the massacre in...
Kids: To TV or Not TV
Byline: Anna Kuchment And Christina Gillham Parents who feel guilty about letting their kids watch TV might breathe a sigh of relief after talking to Deborah Linebarger. Linebarger, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg...
More Than Just a Month
Byline: Raina Kelley February of every year is Black History Month, and it's easy to tell when it's here because we're inundated with images of Martin Luther King Jr. and other celebrated African-Americans. All of it can seem mostly pro forma political...
Move Back to College
Byline: Linda Stern Here's a bright spot in all the housing market gloom and doom: college communities. Town-and-gown spots like Austin, Texas; Charlottesville, Va., and Madison, Wis., have long been heralded as great places to live and retire because...
Out of the Wilderness
Byline: Jerry Adler A new study says we're not getting out into nature as much as we used to. Maybe that's a good thing. In wildness is the preservation of the World. So wrote Thoreau, back when there was plenty of wildness and little reason...
Perspectives
"I'd forestall the launch of a national campaign and, frankly, I'd be making it easier for Senator Clinton or Obama to win. Frankly, in this time of war, I simply cannot let my campaign be a part of aiding a surrender to terror." Republican presidential...
Rip This Book? Not Yet
Byline: Steven Levy The very existence of a book scanner for consumer use is one of those early warnings of turbulence to come. Could the publishing industry get Napsterized? That was my first thought when I saw the marketing materials for the...
Santa Monica Peers
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh The Oscars are grand, if a little stiff. But the stars' favorite show is the beer-and-beach Spirit Awards. Let's say you're an actor who's delivered an exceptional performance in an Oscar-bait movie. Normally, your winter...
So Much for A Warm Welcome
John McCain is the presumptive GOP nominee for president. In the face of serious opposition, his campaign is reaching out to movement leaders and trying to make nice. Ann Coulter has made controversy her currency, outrage her oeuvre. And a lot of...
Survived Cancer, Want Job
Byline: Mary Carmichael Some childhood cancer survivors try to hide their disabilities; others admit to having problems but don't explain why. Jolene Harvey has a small voice and, at 4 feet 8, a small body. Although she has a medical assistant's...
The $3 Trillion Cop-Out
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Most Americans don't seem bothered by more government spending and endless budget deficits. We're focused on our own entitlements. The $3.1 trillion budget submitted last week by President Bush with a projected $407...
The Biology of Love-Not
Byline: Sharon Begley A stripper who feels sexy gives a more tip-worthy lap dance than one who feels uncomfortable or bloated. All in all, it was probably a mistake to let scientists anywhere near the topics of love and lust. Just as analyzing...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham No one I know really likes being criticized. At our best we acknowledge the utility of differing views, but hearing about our shortcomings is still emotionally taxing. To be reviewed and second-guessed is part of life, and a...
The Expectation Gap
Obama and Clinton each claim they can bring about change. But candidates have been promising that forever, so why should voters buy in this time? A reality check. At the Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner in Des Moines last November, an annual ritual...
The General's New Mission
Byline: John Barry, Zahid Hussain and Ron Moreau; With Mark Hosenball In Washington Pakistan's latest Army chief holds the key to next week's vote, and to the future of his unstable nation. He stands at one end of the back row in his class photo,...
The King of Nascar
Byline: Daniel McGinn Rick Hendrick is the force behind racing's biggest stars. But can he handle Dale Earnhardt Jr.? It's lunchtime at Hendrick Motorsports in Concord, N.C., and 550 employees gather in a hangar-size meeting hall. The workers--who...
The Perils of Passion
Byline: Anna Quindlen When it finally comes down to a single nominee, the Democratic Party needs to be ready for a united front. The voters sure are. Once upon a time there was a primary election, and it was good. Excellent, even. Millions of...
The Smart Shepherd
Byline: Lisa Miller A New York pastor who says he thinks too much wants to bring his Christian message to the world. Place: New York City. Time: 9 o'clock on a Sunday morning. It's fair to say that many, if not most, of the inhabitants of Manhattan...
The Theater of Big Change
Byline: Jonathan Alter Maybe the most relevant question is, which candidate is best at the other person's strength? The word "change" is now so overused that it's in danger of sliding past platitude into meaninglessness. But it must be working,...
The War We Forgot
Byline: Tony Dokoupil World War I has no national monument. No iconic images. And only one soldier is still alive. Of the 2 million American soldiers sent to the trenches during World War I, only Frank Woodruff Buckles is still alive. The retired...
They Make Me Feel Super
Byline: Eleanor Clift and Sarah Elkins You've probably never heard of Debra Kozikowski, but Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama sure have. Since Super Tuesday, heavyweights from both campaigns have been wooing Kozikowski, a Massachusetts Democratic...
Time to Put the Candidates to the Test
Byline: Peg Tyre In this primary season, one major issue has been all but missing in action: education. Most experts agree that No Child Left Behind, President Bush's plan for closing the achievement gap between rich and poor kids, is a noble effort....
Your New Rebalancing Act
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn; With reporter associate Temma Ehrenfeld When all the world's markets drop together, commentators like to claim that diversification doesn't work. They're wrong. IT'S A CHALLENGING MARKET FOR INVESTORS ("CHALLENGING"...