Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 24, December 15

A Bit Long in the Tooth
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Hollywood found new blood with 'Twilight,' but the vampire metaphor is positively deathless. Midway through the HBO series "True Blood," a man returns home after being sexually humiliated by his vampire-preferring girlfriend....
A New Grip on Life
Byline: Jesse Ellison For soldiers who have lost limbs in Iraq, a prosthetic arm inspired by 'Star Wars' and other bionic ideas. Dean Kamen, inventor of the Segway, is accustomed to being presented with problems people think he should solve....
A Renaissance Man among Gossip Girls
TELEVISION Chances are you know who Wallace Shawn is. The question is how. He's an acclaimed playwright, beloved character actor ("Manhattan," "The Princess Bride"), art-house icon ("My Dinner With Andre") and literary scion, the son of an iconic...
A Sequel to 'The Departed'
Byline: Suzanne Smalley and Evan Thomas Did a rogue FBI agent instigate a mob hit? A judge will soon decide. For many years, John Connolly was the FBI's most effective Mafia investigator in Boston. He has a master's degree in public administration...
A Young Mayor Pushes Reform
Focusing on creativity and design, Seoul's leader is trying to bring more order to a chaotic economy. With a population of more than 10 million, Seoul is the creative, often chaotic heart of the dynamic South Korean economy. To bring order to the...
Bill Gates Goes to School
Byline: Jonathan Alter We know by now what works for at-risk kids. The challenge is trying to replicate it. Buckle up! Bill Gates, wearing an expensive necktie and looking uncharacteristically formal, is now bringing the same high-speed, high-beam...
Brother, Can You Spare Me?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Washington is atwitter about Barack Obama, but there is still one group of people hoping George W. Bush will be their savior: convicts seeking a presidential pardon or commutation. With six weeks to go, the requests keep...
Can a Massage Cause a Stroke?
A Harvard doc answers questions about cardiovascular health. Portland, Ore.: X-rays show that I have calcium in my aorta. My doctor said a lot of people my age (79) have it, and that it is nothing to worry about. Can you tell me more about this...
Desperate Housewares
Byline: Daniel Gross Saks is taking a cue from automakers and offering zero percent financing. Even Tony Bergdorf Goodman is cold-calling shoppers. Early signs indicate this is shaping up to be a dismal Christmas. The International Council of...
Encourage the Rebels
Byline: Vinod Khosla; Khosla is the founder of Khosla Ventures, a venture-capital firm investing in clean technology. Economic growth will depend on innovative entrepreneurs, not incumbent corporations. The world is in the midst of an economic,...
End of the Line for Islamabad
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Unless Pakistan changes how it conceives of its interests and strategy, it will remain an unstable and distrusted place. If the Mumbai attacks were India's 9/11, then it has responded quite differently than the United States...
Financial Paradise Becomes a Mirage
Byline: Christopher Dickey; With Vivian Salama in Dubai and Nick Summers in New York The world's economic woes finally have reached the nation-state of Dubai, and fortunes are crumbling. In her classic account of World War I, Barbara Tuchman...
Gadget of the Stars
Byline: N'Gai Croal The Flip line of pocket-size camcorders has become the latest must-have device. Rivals are taking aim. If the measure of a gadget's success is its ability to win over the rich and famous, Pure Digital's Flip line of pocket-size...
Grover, Calvin and Us
Byline: George F. Will As usual, people are saying we must end 'politics as usual.' And as usual, few wonder why such politics are usual. Emma Goldman (1869-1940), an American radical, said that if elections changed anything, they would be illegal....
Inside the Shopping Brain
Byline: Sharon Begley The difference between the door-buster price and the current one activates 'what if' neurons. If the holiday shopping season turns out to be as grim as many forecasters are warning, among the reasons will be a little brain...
Massage, Please!
Byline: Daniel McGinn And Terry Greene Sterling High-end spas are feeling stressed-out about the economy. In tough economic times, Americans need to relax--and for one route to nirvana, may we suggest the Hamman ritual followed by a Joyambrosia...
Mrs. Kramer vs. Mrs. Kramer
Byline: Lorraine Ali It's an old story--parents split and fight for custody. But when both are women, and one says she is no longer gay, it gets complicated. Isabella prefers to skip rather than walk down the long halls of the Thomas Road Baptist...
Murdoch's Last Laugh
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Just a year after buying The Wall Street Journal, the press rapscallion has revitalized the fusty paper. Andrew Leckey, an inveterate reader of newspapers, recently grabbed a copy of The New York Times as he dashed...
Never Say Die
Byline: Anne Underwood; With Karen Springen Step aside, quacks. The search for longer life is a real science now. By the time it reaches the age of 18 days, the average roundworm is old, flabby, sluggish and wrinkled. By 20 days, the creature...
New Era, New Worry
Byline: Mary Carmichael New tests for Down syndrome could lead to more abortions and less support for families. Beth Allard was recovering from labor, waiting for a hospital photographer to capture her newborn son's first day in the world, when...
No Place at the Table
Byline: Michael Hirsh No one was more prescient about the causes of the global financial crisis than Joseph Stiglitz. The Nobel Prize-winning Columbia economist also came out in support of Barack Obama long before Lawrence Summers, the president-elect's...
Our Mutual Joy
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Sarah Ball and Anne Underwood Opponents of gay marriage often cite Scripture. But what the Bible teaches about love argues for the other side. Let's try for a minute to take the religious conservatives at their word...
Perspectives
"At a time of great crisis with mortgage foreclosures and autos, he says we only have one president at a time. I'm afraid that overstates the number of presidents we have." House Financial Services Chairman Barney Frank, urging President-elect Barack...
Remembering the Perfect Boy
How could I tell Aaron, my new boyfriend, about my old one, my first love, the boy I will never see again? Everything happens faster in college--semesters, making friends, falling in love. There's the option of hooking up every night, or there's...
The Abortion Wars Get Technical
Women have few rights at all when doctors can legally misinform them or deny service entirely. What does it tell us about the state of the abortion wars, that battles once waged over the dignity and autonomy of pregnant women have morphed into disputes...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham On the campus of Wheaton College in Illinois last Wednesday, in another of the seemingly endless announcements of splintering and schism in the Episcopal Church, the Rt. Rev. Robert Duncan and other leaders of the conservative...
The Most Dangerous Man in Publishing
Byline: Louisa Thomas Barney Rosset, the man who brought Beckett's 'Waiting for Godot' and Miller's 'Tropic of Cancer' to America, loves great literature. More than that, he loves a good fight. On a nondescript block south of New York's Union...
The New Sat Score Policy: Tiny Loophole, Big Shock?
Byline: David A. Kaplan; With Samantha Henig and Matthew Philips No. 2 pencils ready? Today's question: will the College Board's new Score Choice policy for the SAT, which lets students hide bad scores in their College Board records from universities,...
'They'll Open Up for This'
Byline: Rick Perlstein; Perlstein is the author of "Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America." Beyond the juicy tape excerpts, there are riches in the 90,000 newly released pages of Nixon papers. It is Dec. 28, 1972, and...
Time for Last Song of Hope
Odetta, 77, Folk Singer ON the same day, on the same steps where Martin Luther King Jr. would deliver his "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963, Odetta--only 33 but already a folk-music force--sang "I'm on My Way." And she was. The singer and civil-rights...
Tracking a New Generation
Byline: Claudia Kalb Recruiting starts next month for the largest long-term study of children's health ever conducted in the U.S. American kids are about to get some much-needed attention. Next month, after 10 years of strategizing, researchers...
Where Survival Is Job One
Byline: Keith Naughton General Motors and Chrysler say they'll be broke by New Year's if taxpayers balk at a $34 billion bailout for the U.S. auto industry. But what about Ford? It's actually benefiting from the stink of bankruptcy hovering over...
Will Stem Cells Finally Deliver?
Major breakthroughs are propelling the field. Science becomes medicine. Many diseases involve the death of cells that the body cannot naturally replace. Sometimes cell death comes suddenly, as in a heart attack. Other times it is slow and inexorable,...
World, Don't You Worry
Barack Obama lives by brands, from his white sox cap to his Harvard Law connections to his campaign's rising-road logo. In 2008 he became a global brand--a "tangible, visual articulation of a 'thought style'," as marketing guru Jonah Disend puts it....
You'll Have A Gay Old Time
Rufus Wainwright is back at Carnegie Hall, only not with Judy Garland this time. His Christmas show includes his mother, his aunt and his sister. He spoke with Nicki Gostin: Whose idea is the show? Definitely my mom's idea, 100 percent. In fact,...